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May 01, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 H

C

and avoid the
17 Nickels Ar-

Get your typewriting and memeo- p g n o d i-
graphing done now and avoid the
rush. O. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels Ar- OFFERED W~rem e
cade.-Adv. ITWal S UGASESSIONSIAll four acts of "Th

e New Lady

SUNDAY DINNER

I

---

ers.-Adv.

Read the Daily for Campus News.

r.
.. c I c 5r'3Ci^v e' 1. 5v '-J .

V V V V V V y

In Memory of
BURRILL ANG:

t ten-thirty, to-morrow morning
will be unveiled, at the First Con
h, to mark the pew occupied fo
by the late President of the U
Burrill Angell.
he address by the minister, at thi
emoration, will review the notabb
-eat and good man whose influen
ply stamped upon the University
td her alumni.

FELL I
, a bronze
gregational
r so many
niversity,-
s tervice of
e career of .
ce has been
y of Michi-

p

Satisfies

the national

demand for a whole-
some, pure and appe-
tizing beverage-at the
soda fountain or with
your meals.
Bevo will more than
satisfy your thirst.
ANHEUSER- BUsCH
ST. LOUIS

DISCUSSION INCLUDES PROBLEMS
CONFRONTING WOMEN
STUDENTS,
Suggestions for lines of work for
Women's Self-Government associa-
tions of middle western universities
and colleges made up yesterday's pro-
gram of the W. S. G. A. conference.
Miss Cleo Murtland, associate pro-
fessor of industrial education, in her
address, "The Ethics of Choosing a
Vocation," said that although all
schools for preparation are now open
to women, they still face the problem
of gaining the right of choice and the
opportunity of pursuing their chosen
work.
"Vocational guidance is necessary,"
she said, "but first should come per-
sonal inquiry and investigation, and
after a choice is made leaders of the
'profession should give guidance"
Miss Mary Hedges, of Ohio State
university, read a paper on "Voca-
tional Guidance" and led an open disa-
cussion on the subject. Round table
discussions were then held on the fol-
lowing subjects: "Scholarship and
Campus Activities," "Point System,"
"Social Life" in its various phases,
including "The Town Girl," "Social
Life Among Men and Women," "Mix-
ers." 4
"Co-operation and Coordination of
Activities ' was the subject of the
paper read by Miss Marie Bodden, o'
the University of Wisconsin, at the
afternoon session. In this Miss Bd-
den outlined a plan whereby students
and faculty might work together in
the arrangement of campus activities.
Miss Elizabeth Forsell of the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, read d paper on
"W. S. G. A., a Democracy or an Auto-
cracy," in which she pointed out that
there was work for all in the college
self-government associations.
"Too often the burden of manag-
ing the association rests upon a few
girls. A truly democratic organiza-
tion will not be attained until every
girl has her own part to perform," she
stated.
A tea for the delegates at the home
of Deal Myra B. Jordan followed the
session.
SELEf -GOERNMENT
ENDORSED HY DEAN
Dean Luella J. Bead, '03, dean of
women at Grinnell college; Grinnell,
Iowa, is visiting the University dur-
ing the Women's Self Government as-
sociation convention. Dean Read is a
graduate of Michigan, having receiv-
ed both Bachelor of Arts and Doctor
of Philosophy degrees from the- Uni-
versity.
"I have been watching the self
government movement for several
years now," said Dean Read in an in-
terview, "and I am heartily in favor
of it, you may suppose. Will it
work? Yes, I believe it will. How-
ever, its application and organization
must vary in different-schools. The
ideal system is one of complete stu-
dent organization with faculty super-
vision. It seems to me that complete
student government has as many
faults as complete faculty govern-
ment. But I am sure that a combina-
tion of the two sources of authrity
is the ideal form of student govern-
ment.
"In the case of a large university,
self government in order to be suc-
cessful should be very carefully and
thoroughly organized. It is only when
organization is complete that a heter-
ogeneous student -body can be self
governed."

Dean Read also spoke of her in-
terest in Michigan. "Being a Michii-
gan alumna," she explained, "I am al-
ways interested in what Michigan is
doing. You will probably be interest-
ed in hearing that Grinnell college
papers quote the Michigan Daily more
than any other student paper.'
City And County
Paving of Detroit street is rapidly
nearing completion.
Young elm trees have been set out
by the city at Washington triangle and
at Cedar Bend drive.

Bantock" will rehearse this afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium. The actress
friends are due at 2:15, and the rest
of the cast will begin practice prompt-
ty at 1 o'clock.
Upperclass baseball practice hours
at Palmer field are as follows: Sen-
iors, 4 o'clock Tuesday and Thurs-
day; Juniors, 5 o'clock Tuesday and
Thursday.
The University Girls' Glee club
wil hold an important rehearsal at
1 o'clock this afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium.
Campus News
H. F. Parsons, '15, and George Sis-
ler, '15, are in Ann Arbor over the
week end.
Timothy Hulett, '19A, of Detroit, is
spending the week end in Ann Arbor.
Renaud Sherwood, '22, has returned
to Ann Arbor after having recovered
from a recent operation at his home
in Detroit.
Wyvern Tea Attended by 100 Women
About 100 junior girls attended the
tea given Friday at Helen Newberry
residence by Wyvern, honorary society
for junior women. Phil Diamond
furnished music for dancing and re-
freshments were served. Alice Beck-
ham, '21, president of Wyvern, said
that by giving this tea, Wyvern hoped
to promote a spirit of greater intim-
acy among the girls of the junior
class. It was the first meeting of the
kind held this year.
CAMPUS ELECTION NOTICE
Nominations from all organ-
izations and all classes must be
in by Monday, May 3, at the lat-
est. Nominations should be tak-
en to the Union desk, addressed
to the chairman of the All-cam-
us election committee of the
Suetcouncil.

MENU

Tea

Strawberry Sundae
Coffee

VARSITY

Milk

TOGGERY SHOP

12"TO 2:00 P. M. PRICE $1.00
Come Early
A La Carte Service-4-7 p. m:

WILLITS CAFE
315 5. State Street
Phone 173

1107 S. UNIVERSITY
AVE.

Soup
Ceram of Asapragus
Wafers

I

Just Received
a Shipment of
English lBlock
Spring Caps
-Look them over-

r I

ql/GE~L£C7RaC VACS
The saving in rug wear alone will pay for
the' TORRINGTON. It removes the
gritty, introdden dirt that cuts the fabric.
It brightens up the delicate colorings of
your expensive rugs and carpets and adds
years to their life. 'Free demonstration.

d
i.
yy ,,

Olives Pickles
Roast Sirloin Beef
Brown Gravy
Fricasseed Chicken with Biscuit
ut Wax Beens
Mashed Potatoes
DESSERT
Huckleberry Pie
Vanilla Ice Cream

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

THE SHOP OF QUALITY
- - 200 E. Washlogton St

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Phone 273

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FLOWERS FLOWERING PLANTS
Cousins & Hall
Members Florists Telegraph Delivery
Phone 115 .1002 S. Univ.
TICKETS ON SALE
at GRAHAM,S
CERCLE FRANCAIS PRESENTS
L'A MI FRITZ
THREE-ACT FRENCH COMEEY
Clever Dialogue
Humorous Plot
Easily Understood
Monday, May 3, 8 P. M.
Sarah Caswell Angell Hall
$1.00.75-.50 Rebate of 50c to Associate Members

I

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It must be
Ice Cold

0

4E

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L

ADVERTISING r

V

I

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N4

UNIVERSITY OF

MICHIGAN

I

C

LOST

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN HARRY B.,HUTCHINS, LL.D., President

u the vicinity of S. Univer-
d State, bar pin set with dia-
and sapphires. Reward $10.!
notify Alfred Huss. 702 S.1
sity. Phone 63.
silver-gray cat with a ring
cut out of tail. Reward.
1704-R.

WANTED
WANTED-Student help-one boy for
morning and one boy for afternoon.
Apply Arcade Cafeteria.
WANTED-One room for two ladies,
May 19-22. Answer care Daily, Box
H. R.
FOR SALE

H

Cosmopolitan Student Community *

E

- III

Eight Schools and ,Colleges

8

lack umbrella, with brown
idle. Left at Union after
night dance. Call 106-W.
anvas covered note book
i organic chemistry notes.
A1 7383, Wright.
-Log slide rule. John E.
hione 1016.
WANTZD
Students during summer
r an old reliable company.
ormer years have found
nt very satisfactory. Sal-

FOR SALE--Good partially seasoned
apple wood, sixteen inch and two
feet lengths. H. L. Thornton. Phone
7136F-12.
FOR SALE- 200 medical books for
sale $.50 and $1 each. Inspection
invited. Mrs. A. Fraser, 16 S. Wash-
ington St., Ypsilanti, Michigan.
FOR SALE-Three May Festival cou-
pons. Phone 2276.
FOR SALFE-Pair of practically new
track shoes, size 8%-9/. Call at
604 S. State St., about 6:30 P. M.
NISCELLANXOUS
WILL STUDENT who by mistake took'
a pair of gray trousers on Fri.,

!liit!ltlll!!!!1!!!!!1

Phone 1393J
and yours will
be ready for yoll

COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS-JOHN R. EFPINCER, Dean.
Full literary and scientific courses-Teachers' course-Higher commercial course-Course
In insurance-Course in forestry-Course in landscape design-All courses open to pro-
fessional students on approval of Faculty.
COLLEGES OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE, MORTIMER E..COOLEY, Dean.
Complete courses in civil, mechanical, electrical, naval, and chemical engineering-Archi-
tecture and architectural engineering-Highway engineering-Technical work under in-
structors of professional experience-Work- shop, experimental, and field practice-Me
chanical, physical, electrical, and chemical laboratories-Fine new building-Central heat-
ing and lighting plants adapted for instruction.
MEDICAL' SCHOOL, V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. Four. years' graded course-Highest
standard for all work-Special attention given to laboratory teaching-Modern laboratories
-Ample clinical facilities-Bedside instruction in hospital, entirely under University con-
trol, a special feature.
LAW SCHOOL, ,HENRY M. BATEs, Dean. Three years' course-Practice court work
a specialty-Special facilities for work in history and political sciences.
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, HENRY KRAMER, Dean. Two, three, and four years'
courses--Ample laboratory facilities--Training for prescription service, manufacturing
pharmacy, industrial chemistry, and for the work of the analyst.
14OMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL, W. B. HINSDALE, Dean. Full four years'
course-Fully equipped hospital, entirely under University control-Especial attention given
to materia medica and scientific prescribing-Twenty hours' weekly clinical instruction.
COLLEGE OF DENTAL, SURGERY, MARCUS L. WARD, Dean. Four years' course-
Modern building housing ample laboratories, clinical rooms, library, and lecture room-
Clinical material in excess of needs.
GRADUATE SCHOOL, ALFRED H. LLOYD, Dean. Graduate courses in all departments
-Special courses leading to the higher professional degrees.
SUMMER SESSION, E. H. KRAUS, Dean. A regular session of the University afford-
ing credit toward degrees. More than 275 courses in arts, engineering, medicine, law,
pharmacy, and library methods.
For full information (Catalogues, Announcements of the various Schools and Col-
leges, Campus Guide Book, etc., or matters of individual inquiry) address Deans of
Schools and Colleges, or the Secretary of the University.

Spraying operations have been sus-
pended due to the lack of lime sulphur,
caused by the railroad strike.
With all reports from its recent
canvass of the county in, the Wash-
tenaw farm bureau places its member-
ship at 2,000.
Fifty-five took the county teachers'

N -

709 North Unibersity

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