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October 14, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

ITGA \Y DAILY

..E . _. DAIL

'Iij

ysical examinations
it is imperative that
atments. Those who
issed their appoint-
ke another at once.

All University women are invited to
attend a picnic to be given by the
Women's Athletic association at 4
o'clock Wednesday afternoon at Palm-
er field.
Women To Make
Customs' Change

Chatter ?ox
Traditions Day! Did you ever stop
to think what Michigan's traditions
have meant to Michigan? And how
much more they might mean were we
all familiar with them? Traditions
Day is primarily for freshmen-but it
would behoove all students to brush
up on Michigan's traditions.

lum work
ts at once
tem. Lock-
ws: Tues-
sday, Oct.
11 o'clock.

assignments for
1 b, posted Wed-
Barbour gymnas-
'e classes in gym-
sday or Friday.
,thena Literary so-
o notice that the
this evening, will
promptly, so that
may attended the
eting in Hill au-
clock.
rdan left today to
oration of Women's
ting at Kalamazoo
be joined on Wed-
[arguerite Chapin,
e Women's league,
Erley, '20, who is
he same organiza-

"Hats, coats, and 'sunimer furs' Haven't you heard innumerable
should not be worn in the class- freshmen say: "Well, what is Tradi-
rooms," says Dr. Walker every year, tions Day? And what are Michigan's
and every year we proceed to dis- traditions? W've read about it in
obey. This year's overcrowded rooms The Daily, but we don't hear it dis-
bake this practice even more detri- cussed. Now, upperclassmen, that is
mental to health. where the freshmen are criticizing
Is it because the girls are lazy, or you. Everything about Michigan's tra-
is it mere convention? If the first ditions cannot be learned in one les-
is true, then surely it's time to reform. son. It takes a little teaching each
If convention is the cause, let's be day.
strong enough to disregard it, and These new men and women are
proceed to forget the styles of frozen eager to learn-everything assumes a
Siberians. . more thrilling, reverential, even sac-
red aspect to them; such enthusiasm
Y. W. C. A. ESTABLISHES BRANCH is found in no other class. Get a little
AT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL of this enthusiasm; enlighten these in-
fants of learning-our proteges.
A new branch of the University Y. Just as the child leasrns more the
W. C. A. formed from the women at first six years of his life than in all
the University hose al held their succeeding years, so does the student
peniversirtyatNe erryhlStein his freshman year learn more about
opening party at Nev erry hail, Sat-Mihgntainalhsucedng
urday night, from 8, to 10:30 o'clock. Michigan than in all his succeeding
One hundred and twenty-five nre years. The University, under the di-
e redntnurses rection of the Student council is do-
were pres-ent. ing its share by having one big Tra-
ditions Day. Now you do your part
The Michigan Daily, delivered to and make every day a Traditions Day.
your door daily except Monday, $3.50
a year.-Adv.

- =

Engineering News

TEVENS & PERSHING
lor Millinery Exclusive
Near State PHONE 1028-W
Headquarters for
_ CORONA, L. C. SMITH
and other high grade
T YPE WR I TE R S
at my new store
17 NICKELS ARCADE
R RI L L FARMERS ANXMECHANICS BANK'

The Michigan branch of the Amer-
ican Society of Mechanical Engineers
will hold its first meeting of the year
at 7 o'clock Wednesday night in room
229, Engineering building. Plans for
the coming year will be discussed,
and new ideas formulated by the
committee on student branches of the
national organization will be intro-
duced.
Members of the engineering honor
committee will meet at 5 o'clock tt.
night in room 301, Engineering build-
ing. The honor system will be ex-
plained to the freshman at tomorrow
morning's assembly.

--- ^.
,,

STROP and
ITTE RAZORS

Nominations for officers of the
junior engineering class will be held
at the assembly at 8 o'clock Thurs-
day morning in room 348, Engineer-
ing building. Class football 'nana-
gers will be nominated.
.,
Mr. Prevost Hubbard, chemical en-
gineer for the American Asphalt asso-
ciation, will lecture on "Asphalt
Road-Building" at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in room 165, Chemistry build-
ing. According to Prof. A. E. White of
the chemical engineering department.
Mr. Hubbard is the greatest authority
in this country on asphalt road work.

Matinee Nusicale
Offers Program
To meet a growing demand in Ann
Arbor for music that provides a more
intimate atmosphere, the Matinee
Musicale has secured several artists
for concerts this season.
This series of concerts will be as
follows:
Oct. 27-Mmo. Olga Samaroff, pian-
iste.
Dec. 2--Zelnia de Maclot, dramatic
soprano, accompanied by Maud Ok-
kelberg.
Dec. 16-Ypsilanti Normal choir
under the direction of Frederick
Alexander.
Jan. 21-Ilya Schkolnik, violinist
concert master of the Detroit Sym-
phony orchestra, with Mrs. George
B. Rhead,. accompanist.
March 24-The Zoellner string quar-
teit.
This series of concerts will, with
the possible exception of the number
given by the Ypsilanti Normal choir,
be held in the Michigan Union as-
sembly hall. Tickets for the course
may be obtained at Wahr's book stor
beginning Thursday, Oct. 16.
WHITE TO DISCUSS
PEACE CONFERENCE
William Allen White, who will lec-
,ure at 8 o'clock Friday night in Hill
auditorium on "What a Reporter Saw
at the Peace Conference;" is perhaps
best known throughout the country
as an author.
After the publication of his "The
Court of Boyville" some years ago
the public hailed him as one of ex-
ceptional insight in matters of boy
life, but the appearance of "A Cer-
lain Rich Man" proved, to them that
this insight was not alone confined to
4uestions of boyhood.
Treats Fundamental Problems
"A Certain Rich Man" shows the re-
3ults of long and careful study of the
Luthor's fellowmen, and marks the
beginning of some of the fundamental
'problems with. which society is strug-
,ling today.
Following, this story, which deals
with the amassing of a huge fortune
y one individual, came Mr. White's
"The Old Order Changeth," wherein
te handles more completely the prob-
lems introduced in the previous plot.
He suggests needed changes in the
social, political, and moral structure
of society, partially earning for him-
self here his reputation as a re-
former.
Writes on War
Among his other books are "God's
Puppets," "In the Heart of a Fool,"
and "The Martial Adventures of Hen-
ry and Me," the "Henry" in this in-
stance being Henry J. Allen, present
governor of Kansas. This last book
s a story of the European war, based
on the observations of Mr. White as a
representative of the American Red
Cross in France, and treats both the
pathetic and humorous phases of the
world conflict.
Mr. White comes to Ann Arbor un-
der the auspices of the Ding's Daugh-
ters of the Congregational church.
HOOVER FORESEES COLLEGES
AS CENTERS OF RADICALISM
Declares Economic Prosperity, Un-
shared with Teachers, Source
of Danger
t In a speech before the Harvard club
of California, Mr. Herbert Hoover,
former federal food administrator,

voiced the opinion that unless bet-
ter pay is forthcoming'for the teach-
ers in colleges,,athe nation will be face
to face with a dangerous radicalism
from the centers of higher educa-
tion.
He asserted that class distinction
and class hatred has arisen from the
war, and cannot be easily obliterat-
ed. "The development of radicalism
in Europe is beyond anything in his-
tory. America is a fertile field, and
responds quickly to any wind that
may blow. This European wind of
radicalism is sweeping our way, and
it is affecting us.
"In our great universities the teach-
ing staffs are hard hit by the pres-
ent economic situation, which, in the
face of enormous prosperity, returns
something like $7.00 a day to the in-
structor, while the craftsman makes
more in fewer hours of work.
"America cannot permit this grow-
ing J/ense of injustice to remain with
the nation's educators. There is a
menace to the nation's safety in dis-
content in the background of the uni-
versity faculty work, and every right
thinking citizen must see it."
Northwestern Has Large Enrollment
A total registration of 1,738 has
been reached at Northwestern univer-
sity, in the literary, college. There
are 769 men and 969 women.

I

Tutles
Lunches
Nunnally's
Candy
Maynard St.

5Cc a package
before the war

5 c a package
during the war

5c a vacka~e
5 NOW
THE FLAVOR LASTS
SO DOES THE PRICE!

FRESH FRUIT SUNDAES
FRESH FRUIT SODAS
HOME MADE CANDIES
Fresh Daily
HOT CHOCOLATE
Visit the
The Sugar Bowl
109 S. MAIN STIEET

i

l

I
ti'
r o v,, ...
P, I - '4{

e

J,
V'1

I

1

YOU LIKE IS HERE

LETE ASSORTMENT

Eberbach & Son Co.'
200-204 E. LIBERTY ST.
iSNTED On Our Floors
any Splendid Examples of

. h.17
b d

Fine

4

Furniture

At their first meeting of the year,
held yesterday afternoon, the junior
architects made the following nom-
inations for class officers:
President, H. Bisbee, J. H. Page, J.'
.W.Kideney; vice-president, H. H.
- Battin, R. H. Ward; treasurer, L. F.
Schott, A. A. Roemer; secretary, J.
L. Peterson, V. D. Robertson.
Elections will be held Friday night
,at 8 o'clock in room 301, Engineer-
ing building.
Masque Tryouts to Be Held Today
Tryouts for membership in Masques,
the dramatic club of the University
women, will be held at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. Any woman in the University,
including freshman girls, interested
in play production is eligible to mem-
bership, whch is determined wholly
on the basis of ability.
Although this organization is lim-
ited .to 50, tMere are- more vacancies
this year than usual owing to the num-
ber of places left by seniors who
formed a large part of last year's
membership.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every cstom-
er, whether the aeconnt be large
or small
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorpora ted 1869
Capital and urpi.. $i50,000.00
Rpaoures' .... 4,000,044.0O
\..,.1hwes Cor Main & Hvron
, o h FTniversity Ave,
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson-
(June 9, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:io a.
m., and hoursly to 9:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (ECx-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound--6:oo a. m., 9:05. a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. nm., o:o
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, ir :4 p. M., 12:20
a. m., i :xo a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6 :48 a, im. and

Fashions for Women
and Misses

in Coats, Suits,

Wraps, Dresses,

A NNOUINCEMENT
of the showing of
Fall and Winter

Afternoon

and Evening

Wear

Millinery, .and Dress Accessories
at the Majestic Theater
Wednesday and Thursday
October fifteenth and sixteenth

WE HA VE THE,

SURE OF

SHO WING

WEDNESDAY/ MATINEE
showing Lingerie and Evening

YOU?

Wear.,

Exclusively

for Women

Hailer

WM. GOO0DYEAR & CO.

ty Street

,_.

m

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