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April 24, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NiGRI
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1917.

a

PRICE I

I i

D
NIL

'USAL TO AC-
CAUSES

T'

ARRIVES TO
S U. S. OBSFERVER

WOMEN G.O.P.'S TO
ORGANIZE TUESDAY
Organization of a women's section
of the Republican club will be effect-
ed at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon
at Lane hall, officials of the men's or-
ganization announced last night.
For the occasion Miss Rose Moriarty
of Cleveland, prominent among women
Republicans, has been secured to ad-
dress the organizers. Tea will be
served.
Miss Moriarty will speak on "Wom-
en in Politics." She is reputed to be
an excellent speaker, well versed in
the principles of Pier party. All wom-
en interested in politics. have been
asked to attend.
Sue Verlenden, '20, heads the com-
mittee in charge. It is expected that
a permanent active oragnization will.
be effected.
UNION WILL SIMPLIFY
REGISTRATION METHODS
RECORD CARDS MAY. BE ISSUED
SIMULTANEOUTSLYWITH EN.
ROLLMENT BLANKSl

STRIKERS PHRFE
JAIL TO WORKING

i of Soviet State
Presented To
By Italy

d Press)

il 23. - "You will
a Minor, and Italy
ingle soldier or pay
id Senior Hitti, the
an interview today
al analysis by him
ce treaty.

Government Officials' Threat of Bars
Fais to Faze 590 Switchmen
at Cleveland
BOTH FACTIONS REMAIN FIRM
IN NEW YORK RAIL TROUBLE
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, April 23.---Five hundred
striking switchmen at a meeting today
agreed rather to go to jail than return*
to work after officials of the depart-
ment of justice requested the strike
leaders to tell them that all of them,
approximately 1,500, would be arrest-
ed if not back by morning. This was
after John Sawken, department of Jus-
tice agent who attended the meeting,
had demanded that the strike leaders
order the men to return to work or
themselves be thrown in jail.
Government Gives Warning
The government warning given by
Frank O'Rourke, president of the
Cleveland Yardmen's association,
brought a noisy demonstration from
the men at the meeting. After the an-
nouncement Sawken called the 15
leaders into a private room, where he
told them of the government's plans.
The leaders returning to the meet-
ing informed the men of the govern-
ment's proposal.
"Every man who wishes to avoid ar-
rest by returning to his Job will kind-
ly rise and leave the room," they said.
Many men moved. "Every man who
chooses prison bars to wages will
rjse," O'Rourke said. The 500 men
rose in a body, cheering and shouting.
Sawken Attends Meeting
The government officials' next move
had not been decided upon tonight. Mr.
Sawken went to a closed meeting of
the strikers today and personally ap-
pealed to the strikers to, return to.
work..

SUCCESSFUL TOUR OF MUSICAL
CLUB ANNOUNCED IN TELEGRAM
That the western trip of the Michigan Glee and Mandolin club
has been a complete success was further emphasized by the follow-
ing telegram, received last night:
Marshall, Tex., April 23, 1920.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
On way home after playing 12 cities. Special concerts for Gov-
ernors Wyoming, Arizona, and commander-in-chief Mexican army,
Juarez, Mex. Also many publicity and high school concerts. Thirty-
three men. Seventeen-day trip. Special concert for movie stars Los
Angeles. Entertained by alum nii and University clubs every-
where. Financially better than expected. Crowds average 1,500.
Dances ana auto tours galore. Joint performance University Utah 1
opera. Visited Universial City, Chinatown, Mexico-Arizona desert,
Roosevelt dam, four state capitals. Travelled nine railroads, special
car, 6,000 miles. Health excellent. Weather . hot. Secured many
new students. Arrive 8 o'clock Monday morning. -
UNIVERSITY OF -MICHIGAN GLEE AND. MANDOLIN CLUB.
Engineering Society Reoganiztion
Arouses Much Interest On Campus

SA4N DIEGO FOI
V MEXICAN WATE1
DISPATCHED ON ORDERS F1
DEPARTMENT OF
STATE
TWO PORTS' OFFICIAL
REQUEST PROTECTI
Exact Situation Unknown; No Dis
bances Reported at Mazatlan.
or Toloobamto
Washington, April 23.-Two v
ships from the Pacific fleet were
route tonight to IMexican waters
protect American interests at I
atlan and Toloobamto. They m
dispatched from San Diego on or
after a request for protection j
state department representatives
the two ports.
A similar request came from F
tera on the gulf coast, but was v
held pending investigation. The ci
er Santo Domingo is just a short d
ance from there. The exact situa
on the Pacific coast was not kn
here. There had been no report
disturbance at any place, and la
advices said a federal force of
men and two cannon had arrived
Mazatlan.
At the navy department it was
that the cruiser Salem and Destr
No. 276, ships ordered, to Me:
were investigating the situt
There are extensive American in
ests in this region, the Mexico-(
fornia steamship line and the Sen
ole lines being there. Word had 1
received at the offices ofathe comp
that both of the Mexican ports
been closed.
PRIMARY RETURN
Butte, Mont., April 23.-First
cincts reporting here today in
presidential primaries gave John
31; Lowden, 4; Hoover, 2; H;
ing, 1; and Wood, none.

.ENIA CREATED
', April 23.--Armenia is to
in independent state. This
s reached by the Supreme
the Allies today, because
States or any other powe
ng to accebt a mandate
ver.
aderwood Johnson, Amer-
ador to Italy, arived this
act as observer for the
ss during the sittings of
e council. Mr. Johnson
t instructions as to what
o here and awaited cable
om the state department.
ery sorry," Premier Lloyd
"that the United States
g part in the settlement
sh question. We need the
in Urifn fnaz"

a

"Registration of Union members will
be greatly expedited with the begin-
r ning of the fall semester, according to,
plans of the committee- having this
matter in charge," stated George Hur-
ley, general secretary of the Union,
yesterday.
The cards to be filled out for tabu-
f lation by the Union will be. less than
one-half the size of the ones issued last
t fall, but will cover the same infor-
- mation. Condensation of space has
been attained by a simplified grouping
of activities. Thus the'same informa-
tion will be obtained, but on half the
t number of cards used in the first reg-
istration. Again, only the master card
wilt hav.e to be signed, contrary to the'
plan last year of signing all the cards
filled out.
Another plan to increase the effi-
ciency of this registration, but contin-
gent upon the approval of the secre-
taries of the various departnemts, is
to issue these blanks with the rest of
P a man's registration cards and have
him fill them all out at the same time.
E He will then present his Union blank,
duly filled out, at the desk in the
Union building in exchange for his
membership card. If such a plan
meets with the approval of the vari-
ous secretaries it will eliminate regis-
tratior in the Union building, and will
permit the grouping of cards under the
different departments.

C3MVITTEES TO MEET
A combined meeting of the
chairmen of the senior memor-
ial committees will be held at
4:30 ~o'clock Monday in the f ront
room of the Press building.
I . UU
CHORAL CLUB PRESENTS0

(ii. L. B.)
The recent report of the senior en-
gineering class committee concerning
the relations of the Engineering so.
clety with the branch organizations of,
the engineering college has 'aroused
much interest and has caused no lit-
tle 'discussion as to how the society can
be made more useful and effective in
the activities of the Engineering
school.

inte7

commercial re-
As to political
in accord with

LANS

Press)
23. - Senator
withdrew to-
r Democratic
thus virtually
f Senator Un-
the Democrat-'

e in a.
icl he
s indi-
y. TIe
part of
the re-

FRENCH MATHEMATICIAN WILL
GIVE TWO LECTURES MONDAY
Professor Hadamard, of the College
de France, will lecture on the "Life
and Work of Henri Poincare" at 10
and at 1 o'clock Monday in the west
lecture'room of the Physics building.
Professor Hadamard, whose particular
field is mathema4ics, is a visitor in the
United States. He will be entertained
by the faculty of the Mathematics de-
partment Mpnday. noon at the Union.
Professor Hadamard's lecture will
be given in English,
SMALL TORNADO STRIKES IN,
SOUTHWEST PART OF COUNTY
A small tornado, of which the rain-
storm here was a part, struck the
country southwest of Ann Arbor at
about 4 o'clock Thursday. The worst
damage was done at Lodi and Milan,
where many barns and houses were
destroyed and cattle killed. As far as
is known no lives were lost.

New York, April 23.-The refusal of
railroad heads to modify their ultima-
tum and the equal determination of
the strikers to hold out tonight de-
stroyed all hopes for a, complete set-
tlement of the railroad difficulty in the
metropolitan district.
Leaders Not Discouraged
A statement by the general mana-
ger's assistant that "Intervention by
all mayors in cities of the east could.
not alter the railroad position," did
not discourage strike leaders.
Tonight the strikers placed hope in
a meeting of mayors of New Jersey
cities, where they expect a resolu-
tion to be passed approving granting
them seniority rights. The committee
of strikers will call on Mayor Hyla.n,
to enlist his aid in their behalf'
Summer Session
Prospects $B right
Prospects for the coming mmer
session are shown to be. unusually
promising by the large number of in-
quiries that have been flooding the
University offices. Advance registra-
tions are by far more numerous this
year than ever before.
Prof. G. R. La Rue, director of the
Biological station, said yesterday that
the advance registrations to date total-
led more than the entire attendance
at the station last summer. He said
that already the living accommoda-
tions had all been reserved, but that
there were stiltslaboratory accommo-
dations for many more students. Pro-
fessor La Rue expects the attendance
this summer to surpas by far any
former. record.

YESTERDA Y'S

GAMES

Hitchcock breaks
developed at the
. 15, when the
e to select a stic-

ELL-RONDPROGRAM'
(L. H.)
With a chorus of 30 male voices, and
a well-rounded program of 16 num-
bers, the Copper Country Choral club
concert was presented at 8:15 o'clock
last night in Hill huditorium.
Miss Hazel Silver, lyric soprano,
scored a decided success with her
"Summer" and "I Heard a Cry," while
her several other offerings were re-
ceived with hearty applause by the
audience. Will Hall, baritone soloist,
a well-known favorite in previous
choral concerts., offered two solos,
"Vision Fair'" and "Invictus."
The numbers presented by the chor-
us proved a distinct hit. "Italian
Salad," a musical concoction pleasing
because of its originality and artistic
presentation, was the most popular
offering of the evening, while "Sum-
mer's Lullaby" and "Myra," with Har-
ry E. King, director of the concert,
taking the tenor part, were well ap-,
plauded.
Miss Lyle E strom, pianist, de-
serves special mention because of her
splendid interpretation in accompani-
ment.

(By Associated Press)
American League
Boston, '4; Washington, 2.
Chicago-Detroit, rain.
Cleveland-St. Louis, rain.
Philadelphia-New York, rain.
National League
Nel York-Boston, rain.
Cincinnati, 5; Chicago, 3.
Brooklyn, 3; Philadelphia, 1.
St. Louis, 9; Pittsburg, 7.
REFUND WILL BE GIVEN ON

,.3
E'

One point upon which all engineers
agree is that the society under its
present organization does not fulfill
the functions for which it was organ-
ized. This circumstance has been of
long standing and it has been one of
the main reasons why the various spe-
cialized societies have been introduc-
ed and have grown so rapidly. As a
result of these specialized societies the
Engineering society is now in a po-
sition 'where it finds itself of practi-
cally no influence. Everyone realiz-
es, however, that in the society, there
lie many possibilities for real service
if it undergoes complete reorganiza-
tion, and many are of the opinion that'
the recommendations of 'the Senior
class committee are the most feasible
yet offered.
General Society Desired
There are a great many engineering
students and faculty members who
vwrould like to see a big, efficient, gen-
eral engineering society that would
include all engineers. As it is now,
freshmen are not eligible for the ppe-
cialized societies and since there is no
incentive for them to join the Engi-
neering society under present condi-
tions, they lose many of the benefits
that could be obtained through affilia-
tion with a live organization. "The
onlyadvantage that I can see in be-
lon* Bing to the Engineering society is
that you have a room in which to
smoke," stated a prominent engineer
recently.
Broadening Influence Missed
-Advocates of a big, general society
argue that there is a tendency these
days for engineers to confine them-
selves to one specific engineering field
too early in their college careers and
thereby miss the great broadening in-
Quence which might be obtained
through affiliation with a general so-
ciety. Since the specialized societies
are now well established here and are
doing a good work, the general opinion
is to the effect that the recommenda-
tions of the investigation committee
should be accepted and the Nyork of
reorganizing the Engineering society
along the lines it suggested be started
at once.
NEBRASKA FACULTY MEMBERS
RECEIVE 26 PER CENT RAISE
An increase averaging 26 per cent
has been made in the salaries of the
faculty of the University of Nebraska.
The board of regents has announced
that the average salary will be
$2,483.10.
MILWAUKEE MEN TO ENTERTAIN
PRESIDENT AND TWO DEANS
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins, Dean Mor-
timer E. Cooley, and Dean Victor C.
Vaughan will be guests of the Milwau-
kee Alumni association at a dinner to
be held Monday, May 3, in Milwaukee.

I.

0. T. C. CLUB OFFICERS
ELECTED; BANQUET PLA

Election of officers was made at
meeting of the R. O. T. C. club la
night in the Natural Science auditc
ium. The men elected were: Prey
dent, M. W. Turner, '23E; vice-prey
dent, D. W. Ressler, '23E; secretar
J. W. Kellog. 123E, and treasurer,
P. Mullott, '23E.
Plans were discussed for a banqu
to be held at the Union the latt
part of May in honor of the men w
are to attend summer camps.
At the conclusion of the busine
session two reels of pictures we
shown depicting the work of sign
corps and artillery units in action
France at the time of the big, driv
of 1918.
APPLICATIONS FOR ZOOLOGY
SCHOLARSIIIP DtE BY MAY
Applications for the Bryant Walk
scholarship in zoology should be ma
to Prof. Jacob Reighard before M
3. The Walker scholarship is offe
ed by the staff of the departrient
zoology and pays tuition for a s
weeks course at the Marine Biologic
laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass.
laboratory annonucement may be se(
on the bulletin board near the do
of room' 229, Natural Science buil
ing.
INDIANA WILL HAVE LARGEST
ORADUATING CLASS IN HISTO1
Indiana. university will this ye
have the largest graduating class '
her history of a hundred years, accor
ing to a recent announcement of Dea
Hoffman. He states that there willt
approximately 315 candidates for A.
degrees and about 35 candidates f
B.S. degrees.
ILLINOIS PROFESSOR WILL
ADDRESS NIENORAR SOCIE'T
Prof. Edward C. Baldwin of t
University of Illinois, will address t
Michigan Menorah society at 8 o'clo
Sunday in Lane hall, his subject beiF
"Isreal's Message to Our Distract
World"
o c hinLrln zwill ha e atribi

' WILL BE

UNUSED BASEBALL. T
Due to the fact that it was
ble to have tickets for the

'ICKETS
impossi1-
baseball

"STRICTLY OVERALLS"DECREEDF

Registrar Hall Optimistie

AS COLUXBtA PO[ FASHIO
Following the example of, lhepre s
agents, critics, and theatrical wditer-
in New York who are wearing blue
overalls in oyee to defeat the high
cost of iving, the students at the Uni-
versity of Columbia have announced
that their junior prom garb is "strict-
ly overalls for girls and men."

heO 18s

1

NO "SCHlOO MARMS" IN THIS
YEAR' VASSAR SENIOR CLASS

Registrar A. G. Hall expressed him-
self' as being certain that if no un-
foreseen difficulties arose, there would
be nothing to prevent this being the
largest Summer session in the history
of the University.;
Dean Bates. stated that he believed
the attendance in the Law school this
summer would be fully as Ilrge as last
year, which was marked by the larg-
est enrollment in the history of the
school. In view of the fact that many
of the students are following the reg-
ular three Summer session program,
he would not venture to estimate the
number of other students who would
enroll in law courses.
Dean J. R. Effinger, of the College
of Literature, Science, and, Arts, says
that he is confident that an unusually
(See Number 1, Page Six)

game in Detroit distributed in Anil
Arbor, all those who paid for tickets
and do not get them in Detroit will
be able to get a refund after Saturday.
There will be no refund m'ade on the
luncheon tickets. Carl Johnson, '20
in charge of this work, will make the
necessary refunds.
COUNTY OFFICIALS WILL BE
WEARING 'EM NEXT MONDAY
In order to reduce the high cost of
wearing apparel, county ofllcials at the
courthouse in Ann Arbor will don
overalls next Monday morning. This is
a result of the action of Andrew J.
Sawyer, attorney, who appeared at his
office yesterday morning dressed in the
above costume.

ICE

college will not graduate a
chool marm" this year, ac-
o a recent survey of the se-
s. Low salaries have caused
hun teachers' jobs and turn

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