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May 29, 1919 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-29

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THE MICHIGAN DATLY

THURSDAY, MAY

an Professors Blusily
Writing New Text Books

Although the war has served to de- pared in conjunction with Arthur R.
crease the writing and publication of .Cushney, professor of pharmacology
books of every kind by creating a pap- in the University of London, a "Lab-
er shortage and by bringingabout an. oatory Guide in Expeimental Pharm-
increased cost of issuance it has not, acology." Prof. Rollo E. McCotter,
according to the views of campus pub- : professor of anatomy, has prepared an
lishers, affected in considerable de- outline of dissection methods in an-'
gree the writings of University of atomy. D. Quinter O. Gilbert, instruc-
Michigan professors, nor has Univer- tor in internal medicine, has written a
sity publication fallen off in marked manual of procedue for the clinical
degree during the past year or so. laboratory. It contains methods given
Professors in every department are to junior students in laboratory diag-
now engaged in preparing treatises, nosis.
texts, and other writings for the press. Mathematics Text
The bulk of the material which is un- Prof. Louis C. Karpinski, of the
der way is not yet near enough ,to mithematics department,. has collab-
completion to admit of definite an- orated with Profs. J. W. Calhoun and
nouncement, though a few works H. J. Benedict, of the University of
which are, or soon will be, on the Texas, in a text book of elementary
presses may be here mentioned. mathematics for the use of students in
Prof. John Barker Waite, of the the freshman year of odinary college,.
Law school, will shortly issue a work for for use in technical school courses.
upon patent 11w. Dean Henry M. It includes vital and essential features
Bates is preparing a revision of Cool- ' of ,the work previously covered in
ey's "Constitutional Law" to be separate courses of college algebra,
brought out some time this summer. trigonometry and analytical geometry.
Book on Aesthetics I , Professor Karpinski has further edited
Prof. Dewitt H. Parker, of the phi- ' four-place logarithmic, trigonometric
losophy department will soon publish and interest tables, the purpose of

';.

GREATEST D)EATH RATE
AMONG, NEW RECRUITS
STATISTICS COLLECTED BY DEANI
VAUGHAN ON IN-
FLUENZA .
Statistics, that are being collected
by Dean Victor C. Vaughan and Cap-
tain George T. Palmer show that the
greatest death rate in the camps, due
to influenza, was among the unsea-
soned recruits.
In a certain camp where only 10 per
cent of the total encampment was
made of recruits more than 30 per
cent of the deaths were found to be
among these men. The reason for this
may be attributed to several causes,
states Dean Vaughan.
Attacks Follow
In the first place the camps which
had a low death rate last fall had at-
tacks of the epidemic although mild
ones, during the preceding spring. The
same was true of many of the cities
having low death rates. Grand Rap-
ids and Toledo were among the cities
having the least increase over the
normal death rate.
Of course every camp which had the
epidemic in the spring was not im-
mune from it in the following fall due
to the fact that many of the troops
which had been there at the time of
the first epidemic had been sent over-
seas and, since it is the people that
are not susceptible, not the locality,
the new, troops that moved in were just
as hard hit as though there had been
no epidemic.
Regulars Less Liable
Another factor which in Dean
Vaughan's opinion enters into consid-
elation is the fact that the recruit,
in the majority of cases did not know
how to take care of himself and hence
contracted the influenza and pneumo-
nia. The regulars and the men who
had been in the camps for some time
knew, on the other hand, how to keep
themselves in a healthy condition and
did not get the disease.
Dean Vaughan interprets these facts
as a strong argument for universal
military training of some sort and said
that he felt that a period of camp
training even though it be only for a
period of three months would teach
the average man to take care of him-
self and thus decrease the amount of

deaths through disease. He feels that
three months is the shortest period of
time that would be of practical value.
PROPOSE ORIENTAL
SCHOLARSHIP FUND!
A plan of raising a fund for schol-
arships for Hindu students who come
to the University has been submitted
to President Harry B. Hutchins by
Nilkant R. Chavre, a special engineer
in the University.
Chavre has outlined his project in a
letter to President Hutchins, and has
asked his permission to raise a fund,
from the interest of which the schol-
arships will be given. The suggested
plan states that the money would be
collected from the people of the state
and country by an Oriental scholar-
ship committee, which would direct
the campaign. Memberships would be
sold on the share basis, each share to
cost one cent a day, and as many
shares as desired can be bought.

period. After the required amount of
' money is secured the scholarship com-
mittee of Ann Arbor would alliliate
itself with a committee in Bombay, In-
dia, which was lately organized. The
work of the Bombay committee would
then consider the applications for
scholarships, the preference to be giv-
en to women students of India.
Ten scholarships are at present of-
fered by the University for which wom-
en students from India are eligible.
The fund making these scholarships
possible, was given in 1917 by Mr.
Levi L. Barbour, a forler regent of
the University.
METHODISTS MAKE PLANS FOR
WORLD WIDE SOCIAL PROGRESS
New York, May 28.--The Methodist
Missionary Centennary announced to-
day broad plans for a movement along
social lines for world' betterment
which includes the adoption of 12
French towns on the Chateau-Thierry
battlefild for reconstruction, the cre-

The fund will be collected once a ation of recreation centers in many
month, unless the shareholders pre- war-worn cities of France and Italy,
fer to pay in advance for a definite the building of hospitals in darkest

Africa, and establishment of agr
tural stations to teach Amer
methods in southern Italy, Chile
other countries. Methodists ev
where are being urged to help in
work.
This vast sociological and indus
enterprise is to be carried on b:
department of 53,000 young men
women from the schools and colle
More than 20,000 Methodist Epi
pal churches, including both the Ne
ern and Southern branches, are
hind the Centennary movement, w
is inspired by the belief of the chi
leaders that the world is confro
by the dangerous spectre of Bol
vism which should be met by relig
influence.
Cast of Allied War Appro imat
New York,. May 28.-Germany
cost the Allied governments app
imately $112,000,000,000 since Au
1, 1914. The debt of the flve a
nations in August, 1914, was $18,4
000,000 and on January 1, 1910,
amount had increased to nearly $
000,000,000.

a work on aesthetics. John Garrett]l which is to expedite computations fall-
Winter, associate professor of Greek ing with the range of the tables. The
and Latin, is editing a production of tables will be of use to engineers,
the late Thomas Spencer Jerome, '84, physicists, chemists, surveyors and
former American consul at Capri, It- statistical experts..
aly. The book is to be called, "As- Volume on Literature
pects of Roman Morals." Dr. Frank Prof. T. E. Rankin, of the rhetoric
E. Robbins, also of the Greek depart- department has lately published a con-
ment, is collaborating with Prof: Louis cise little book called "American Au-
C. Karpinski, of the mathematics de- thorship of the Present Day." In it is
partment, in editing a work by the contained a critical estimate of the
Greek philosopher and arithmetician, work of present day (since 1890) au-
Nichomachus, the translation of which thors of the United States and Can-
was made by the late Prof. M. L. ada, and an enumeration of their
D'Ooge. more important writings.
Professor Edmunds' Work Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the ora-
Books which have been published tory department, has prepared a book
within the year and which may now entitled "Speech-Making," which
be obtained at the State street book- deals with material on the prepara-
stores, are as varied in subject as tion and delivery of original speeches
they are numerous. Charles Edmunds, for the class room, and also intend-
professor of materia medica and ther- ed for the library and desk, of the
apeutics in the University, has pre- public speaker.

ALL THE
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fashion them into garments cut with style.
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or from the heat if you dress in these clothes of comfort.
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They're easy to get and easy to wear.
K. MALCOLM
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AFTER EASTER SALE
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The Delta

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The Delta

--m a --

PROLOGUE AND 3 ACTS

LOST -
LOST-- Lady's black leather purse
containing about $29.00 near Pack-
ard and State Sts., on May 22. Lib-
eral reward to finder. Mrs. R. Frank,
715 Arbor St. 932-J.
LOST-A gold and platinum bar pin,
set with pearls and sapphires. Re-
turn to D. E., 718 Tappan Rd. Re-
ward.
LOST-Large loose leaf note book,
stiff cover. Finder call C. C. Pot-
ter. 311 Thompson, Phone 1198-J.
,LOST-Leather note-book with notes
for this semester.. Please return to
1408 Washtenaw Ave.
LOST-Love's Calculus. Finder please
return to address in book or call
Clark 1850-F2.
LOST? Advetise in The Daily.-Adv.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-For summer furnished
apartment; four rooms and sleeping
porch. 538 Church, rear. Phony,

WANTED
WANTED- Competent Cook wishes
position for coming year of school;
can take full charge; best of re-
ference. Write for appointment.
Mrs. J. Haller, 957 Greenwood Ave.
City.
WANTED-Ford runabout, touring, or
pick-up. Must be in fair condition
and not older than 1914 model. State
lowest price, condition and model.
Box C.
WANTED-Four modern light-house-
keeping rooms ,furnished C.all 984-M
in the forenoon.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - Student furniture for
three room fiat. One Morris sailing
canoe fully equipped. Will sell rea-
sona:ble. Call 625 E. Liberty St.
Door 1.
FOR SALE - New Remington type-
writer, latest model, $75. 116 E. Hu-
ron, upstairs.
FOR SALE-Guitar and outfit, $8. Colt

Staged by George Herbert

100--Singing Strapping Scrapping Soldiers--100
-- and --
40-10th Inf. Band of Musicians-40

SPECIAL SCENIC AND ELECTRICAL EFFECTS
Showing a Day in Camp From Reveille to Taps

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GAS MASK DRILLS
BOXING DRILLS

THE CHORUS ENSEMBLES
THE FAMOUS 10th INF. BAND

This Production Given by Direction
MAJOR GENERAL W. HAAN

Automatic and holster, $12.
Hill St.

f07

Commandant Camp Custer
NO WAR TAX

PRICES 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50

SEATS NO'

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