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October 23, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-23

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DAY AND

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1918.

PRICE THRE

SOPHS GATHER INt
COUNCIL OF WAR
Y An effort on the part of the sopho-
mores of the University to uphold the
traditions of Michigan, will be staged
at the band stand on the campus at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon, when the
second year men are to hold a mass
T meeting.
iTS The disposition of the cases of va-
rious freshmen in the University who
are making nuisances of themselves
by grossly violating the traditions of
the school will be taken up. Many of
CE the first year men, it is charged, are
still clinging to their prep school ideas'.
ents With these in mind they seem to for-
get that they are now attending a
college.
An instance of thorough disregard
im- of the traditions of the Maize and
tion Blue is the case of a meek little frosh,
re- proud of having made a letter in some
ser- prep school, who persisted in walking
mic through the arcade a number of times
rest. with a flaring white W emblazoned
mic on a maroon sweater. Such things as
y to these have made the second year men
.s a decide that discipline is necessary.
neu- Men who are in the S. A. T. C. and
S. N. T. C. are asked to attend th
meeting since it is being held during
i in- their recreation period. It was es-
1 in pecially arranged for this hour, that
and they might be able to be present. Capt.
rred R. H. Durkee is supporting the meet-
long ing and has given permission for his
men to attend.
nili- Herman August, '19, member of the
tals Varsity debating team, Abe Cohn, star
h a halfback on the Varsity football team,
and and William Fortune, team mate of
Of Cohn, will address the assembly.
ight

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ick
hed.
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and

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ITY KITCHENS TO
IVIDE fOR IN1ALIDS

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their
[oseph
Verner

UNIVERSITY GIRLS CARE
CONVALESCENTS IN
BARRACKS

FORT

So successful have the services of
University women proved in aiding
convalescent S. A. T. C. men, that Dean
M. B. Jordan has authorized an ex-
tension of the work to include all the
barracks in the city. Under the sys-
Lem effected by the Women's league,

Army Officials Watch Next Moves of
Field Marshal Foch; Time
to Hit
ALLIES COMPLETE FIRST
"STAGE OF HUN RETREAT
War Leaders Intend to Upset Entire
Plans of Enemy; Morale
Slowly Weakens
Washington, Oct. 22.-Now that the
Germans have been cleared out of
Belgium Flanders, and much of
northern France, army officials here
are watching the battle front intent-
ly, many of them with a distinct feel-
ing that a new storm of attack may
be about to break against the enemy.
There is little doubt here that the
German army is headed for nothing
short of the Meuse line, and that any
pause will be but temporary, to permit
readjustmentof battalions for subse-
quent retirement.
The first stage of a great retreat is
almost complete, and to many officers
it seems possible that events have so
shaped the lines that a great drive
may soon be undertaken, calculated to
upset the whole German plan of re-
tirement. Already the Allied lines
have been shortened so that consider-
able forces are available for the work.
The time cannot be far away also,
when the American second army, un-
der Major-General Bullard, will be
put into action.
So far as the German overtures
are concerned, army officers hold that
now is the time of times for a new and
crushing blow. With the hope of early
peace being dangled before the eyes
of the weary German troops, their
morale would be at its lowest ebb, it
was said, while in the American and
Allied ranks the roundabout German
admissions of defeat can only have
given new zest for the fight.
And Now He Is A
Genuine Yankee
He stumbled down State street, gaz-
ing wild-eyed at an 0. D.ed figure that
had just passed him. -
"'N who, in the name of Cleo, was
that?" he snorted.
Alas, 'tis but too true! When the
Saturday Afternoon Tea clubbers
have donned their newly issued garb,
and have shed the prescribed buckets
of blood over slipping the 49 key rings
on the 49 respective rear surfaces of
the 49 respective blouse buttons, they
no longer recognize themselves. Per-
cy Private of the Rear Ranks frater-
nity wriggles in his woolen undies and
swears that he can do a perfect "about
face" right inside his shoes without
even stubbing his toe on the cow hide.
Gus, of that campus honorary society
known as K. P., having missed out
on the issue of hats and leggings,
floats gaily about-a soldier as to
torso, manifesting his class loyalty by
his frosh toque, and his general in-
souciance by his breeches strings
flapping a la Rio Grande in the wind.
A new organization of the great
misunderstood and misfitted has chap-
ters in every barracks. Its members
are those sufferers who, unable to ex-
change or drown their uniforms, are
wearing 11 double E's in place of the
old 7 A's, English last cordovans, and
whose blouses fit well about the an-
kles. List mercifully to their wail,

quote not of the comforts of Flemish
mud, and snicker softly beneath the
flu mask.
National Food Campaign Starts Des. 1
Because of the influenza epidemic'
the national food campaign which was
to have started Oct. 27, has been post-
poned to Dec. 1. The home cards to
be given out contain no regulations
regarding meatless or wheatless days,
but urge strict conservation of alA
food, particularly wheat, meat, fats,
and sugar, so that exports to our Al-
lies may be increased to the necessary
5,750,000 tons.
Jacks to Get New Uniforms
Orders have been sent to Great
Lakes for over 100 uniforms for the
naval unit. The measurements for
these were taken yesterday and the
day before. About 60 measurements
will be taken daily and the uniforms
will be ordered at the same time.

PLAN TO BUILD 156 SHIPS.
-THREE YEARS; COST TO
BF $972,090,000

IN

e 1
are

QUOTA OF 25 MEN
SENT TO VIRGINIA
Another quota of 25 men will be
sent to camp this morning. Their des-
tination is Camp Eustic (Lee hall),
Va. They will leave on the Ann Ar-
bor railroad at 11:30 o'clock.
The men called are as folows:
Gerald Asa Gale, Thomas William
Cobb, Ray C. Salmon, Charles E.
Kaercher, Howard Wallace Chapin,
Wilson J. Keller, John Malcolm Ryan,
George F. Horn, Cyril Harold Demosh,
Louis E. Curtiss, Bernard Sterling
Mason, William James Mitchell, Harry
E. Apple, Adolph C. Schumenk, Her-
bert Earl Bertke, Wiliam M. Petrie,
Albert John Lelling, Albert Burt, Bert
Walton Johnson, Earl Gebbink, Thorn-
ton Ware, Herman August, S. A. Jan-
owski, Henry Guy Smith, Thomas Wil-
liam Burns, Ernest Herman Hahn.
NATALAUTHORITIES TO
ASK FOR SIOIOO

fsptl L each sorority house and club organi-
zation where meals. are served, has
d one ben placed in direct charge of pro-
Dr. J. curing and serving hot food to sick
r, yes- men in one or more barracks in their
ay en-
respective vicinities.
last Under Dean Jordan's supervision,
ported the services will not be restricted to
meals alone, but will consist of pro-
n stu- viding magazines, fruit, field flowers,
o Dr. and any other inexpensive contribu-
three tions which might provide a touch of
three home comfort for the convalescent pa-
guewz tients. Due to the existing condi-
3uenza tions, it is very difficult for women of
2 stu- the University to do any more direct
con-
war work among the barracks, and
this means of "doing their bit" has
been eagerly accepted by the various
sororities as one other opportunity
her as for patriotic service. The work is ex-
Sfrompected to continue until the University
re de- is provided with a base infirmary suf-
-eturn- ficiently large to accommodate the pa-
n do- tients in the military organization.
Reports from the barracks fully up-
to do hold the claim that the right kind of
ng on hot, substantial food. especially when
correlated with other pontributions of
Major non-military nature, is an effective
ehallysteppping-stone to recovery.

Washington, Oct. 22.-Congress has
been asked by the navy department
to authorize a s*econd three year naval
building program to provide 10 addi-
tional superdreadnaughts, six battle
cruisers, and 14 smaller vessels at a
cost of $600,000,000. This was dis-
closed tonight by Secretary Daniels
after his appearance before the house
naval committee to explain the appro-
priation.
The authorization is asked for the
next fiscal year and is in addition to
the 156 naval vessels comprising the
first three year building program au-
thorized in 1916, and the great num-
ber of new destroyers and other spe-
cial types contracted for since the
United States entered the war. Work
on the first three year program was'
delayed by the war, but congress ahs
required that a start must be made;
on all the vessels before next July 1.
Including the $600,000,000 for the
three year porgram, Secretary Dan-
iels said the total estimates of the de-
partment for ship construction, includ-
ing armor and armament, amount this1
year to $972,090,000.
"The new three year program," See-
retary Daniels said, "is a continuation
of the policy adopted in 1916 of in-
creasing the navy, and contemplate its
steady upbuilding and improvement. It
is in line with the policy adopted by
this government, and which has- met
with the entire approval of the Amer-
ican people, of building up a navy
strong enough to meet all require-
ments."
ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE IS
APPROVED BY NEW YORK STATE
Michigan's Architectural college
has been formally registered as an
approved school, leading to the prac-
tice of architecture in the state of
New York and 14 other states, includ-
ing Michigan, having laws requiring
the registration of architects.
The state of New York has been
invesigating, through its department
of education, the different architec-
tural colleges in the United States.
Only recently has Michigan been noti-
fied of its acceptance in New York,
though such a law has been in effect
in Michigan for three and one-half
years.
All Detroit Schools Closed
Detroit, Oct. f22. - The indefinite
closing, from Thursday on of all pub-
lic, private and parochial schools in
Detroit was ordered by the board of
health today as a precautionary
measure against Spanish influenza.
Other measures include the closing of
retail stores at 4 o'clock, daily disin-
fecting of public buildings, more fre-
quent sweeping of streets, and the
prohibition of all outdoor gatherings.
City Has Coal Supply for Two Years
Ann Arbor householders will not
have to worry about keeping warm
this winter if they have the money to
buy thec oal. Coal dealers say that
there is enough soft coal in Ann Arbor
now to last for two years.
R. T. Cook Goes to Garden City
Ronald T. Cook left yesterday for
Garden City, Long Island, to begin
training in the department of military
aeronautices,

AgLIE ARIES ENTE
IENTENTE ADVNCE
CZECHS CAPTURE
SPECIAL NOTICE
in Regard to the Wearing
of Face Masks
In view of the fact that the
epidemic of influenza is appar-
ently under control, the order in
regard to the wearing of masks
is changed in this respect:
Masks need not be worn on the
streets or on the campus, but
should continue to be worn uitil
further order at all University
exercises
H. B. HUTCHINS,
Oct. 22, 1918. President.
FOR LIBERTY
The following casualties are re-
ported today by the commanding
general of the American Expedition-
ary forces: Killed in action, 100;
wounded severely, 101; missing in ac-
tion, 72; wounded slightly, 105; died
from accident and other causes, 3;
died from wounds, 49; died of dis-
ease, 83; wounded, degree undeter-
mined, 145; prisoners, 1; died of ae-
roplane accident, 1. Total, 660.
LIBERTY LOAN ALLOTMENT FOR
MEMBERS OF S. N. T. C. DOUBLED
The naval unit here made a fine
showing in the Liberty Loan cam-
paign. The average subscription per
man was higher in the navy than in
the S. A. T. C., or in any other branch.
The 510 men in the S. N. T. C. bought
$6,250 worth of bonds, an average of
$51.47 per man.
The quota of the navy was $13,000.
They not only went over the top, but
they more than doubled the amount
asked for. When the existing condi-
tions are taken into consideration
this oversubscription seems even
more remarkable.
K. of C. Club House Open to S. A. T. C.
The Knights of Columbus club house
at 504 South State street is now open
to both sections of the S. A. T. C. Mr.
Leo Kennedy, the army secretary sta-
tioned in Ann Arbor, has been in the
city for the past few weeks looking
after the remodeling of the house. It
is now nearly completed except for
minor details. It is expected that by
the time the new section of S. A. T.
C. has become thoroughly organized
the club house will 'be all ready.
There are arrangements made for
card and billiard rooms upstairs. The
reading room will be downstairs, and'
is already fitted out with comfortable
furniture with more to arrive soon.
There is also a writing room down-
stairs where the men will be furnish-
ed with writing materials. There will
be organized play and entertainment.
This will take the form of football,
friendly wrestling matches and sports
of the like.
New Lot of U. S. Uniforms Wired for.
About 1,700 uniforms were issued
to the S. A. T. C. Monday, which was

a highly insufficient number. But
those who could not come forth in
their stunning new fall suits yester-
day morning need not feel that Un-
cle Sam has neglected them. Indeed
the officers in charge here have wired
for more uniforms. It is reported
that they may arrive any day in the
near future.

Transylvania Roumanans Fig]
- Italians; American Dead
Come Home
(By the Associated Press
With the American army no
of Verdun, Oct. 22.-(9 P. M
clear weather early this morni
mitted of some aerial work,
Americans downed two enem
chines and a balloon. Aside fi
normal harassing artillery fire
enemy on the frontliies and t
areas, and similar activities
part of Americans, the day
without incident. There was
fantry action of importance
remains as it was last night.
All the American dead in
will be taken home after the w
cording to orders received I
army chaplains. The grave r
tion bureau has been workir
this in view, but nothing defi
garding the future disposition
dead, was known here until
tions came to the chaplains
Washington.
(By the Associated Prep
Washington, Oct. 22.-Info
was received today by the Ru
legation that Transylvana I
ians, captured by the Italian
in the Austrian army agains
ancient enemy. The legion v
18,000 and was organized un
supervision of the Rumanian n
committee of Paris.
(By the Associated Press
The fall of Valenciennes t
Marshal Haig's forces is emine
spite the desperate resistance
Germans the British have ente
city on the west, while to th
they have made a deep thrust i
great Raismes forest and are
in. the direction of Conde, n<
angle of the Schledt river.
Although the progress of the
forces in Belgium and Frenc
ders has slowed up somewhat
face of the stiffening of the C
lines, appreciable gains have
made, some of them of much
tance.
Allies Gain Strategic Gro
Hollain and Druyelles, so
Tournai, are now in the hands
British, and north of Tournai, F
has been cleared of the enemy,
withdrawing toward the Sche
er. There has been sharp figh
the crossings of this water
Cont-a-Chain, and the Germa
battling hard to keep the Ali
outflanking Tournai on the ni
Behind the Scheldt river ti
mans are massed in strength.
machine guns on the east b
active and are receiving the
of artillery and trench morta
Belgians Reach Lys Cana
In the northern battle area 1
gians have reached the Lys
along their entire front, an
captured a bridgehead with a
of the enemy west of Meeren
An item of great interest ap
the latest announcement
French war office concerning
tions along the Aisne river.
"The Czecho-Slovaks with us
the village of Terron."
The French are still moving
ly to the north of Laon and ha
completed the occupation of e
dry and Grand Lup. To the
west of Ghe tnthey are firml;
lished on the east bank of
river, having made crossings
eral points, against which th
resisted with determination.
Around Le Ateau ,where Am
are fighting with the Britis
army, activities have increase

ly' The same is true of the
can sector northwest of Verdun
the chief activity of the ene
been the shelling of America
with mustard and other gas
and an air raid, which came
a""iev"" the detru"ti"

1H R19LENCIEN
BLOW IN FLAN
TERRON ON
LIBERTY ROLLER SMAI
'NAT SALIENT; LINE

BOCH
RAID

AIRPLANE
ON BASE I

men
Fisel

at-]
int.
3spe

short a
f thevi to
as avail-

SENIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS
HELP IN VARIOUS INFIRMARIES

e o
add

f their Medical authorities of the Univer-
ed. sity have received no orders for the
senior medical students to go out of
nade a town on influenza cases. At present'
ks and there are several seniors detailed to
ditions help each day at the various infirm-
re re- aries of the S. A. T. C. and the S. N.
Captain T. C.
inspec- Six are at Barbour gymnasium
t done. which has been taken over by the
11 was military authorities and is being used
od for as an infirmary. Two are at the Red
there. Cross hospital, and two mtore are giv-
Jniver- ing their services at the infirmary at
the Chi Psi house. These men are
giving valuable assistance, rendering
y Help aid when no other is available. Be-
board 'sides this they are getting practical
elp ad- experience which will benefit them in
their future work.

%I

11

SOMETHING MUST BE DONE!
To uphold Michigan traditions.
All members of the class of
1921 be at the bandstand at 4:30
o'clock Wednesday afternoon,
Oct. 23. In case of rain the
meeting will be held in Univer-
sity hall.
SOPHOMORES, REMEMBER
- YOUR DUTY!!!

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