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October 22, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-IIGAN

Y

4A 11L' 1V

Il U~llNlJId
SCONTIOUS

A

,SO SAYS
IES NEED
SYSTEM

TOBACCO
NEW

hone mouthpieces. have been
I a source of contagion, by
aunicant of the Detroit Free
He states that a home instru-
hn catch enough germs from
eted member to contaminate
rest of the family. This fact
public telephones much more
Jns. It is worth thinking about
all telephones, both home and
thoroughly sterilized daily.
lls attention to another source
ible infection, namely, in the
a" which are sent abroad to the
.If a cigar factory were in-
it would be found that prin-
Spaniards, Cubans, Porto Ric-
exicans, and Negroes handle
ars, and in the process of their
;ion put them to their lips and
to bite off the end of the wrap-
ich closes the end that the
takes into his mouth.
11 also be discovered that the
of these same nationaliti~es
ed there, who look tubercular,
the strips of the cigar bands
ing them across their lips and
. The writer protested against
ndition of. things on a recent
;ation in Florida, but the man-
ers declared that tobacco is an
fic and will not carry germs,
t even if they were to try to
Fy with this "time-honored"
such a revolutionary step in
the workers would not con-
such a revolutionary step
method of their work.
writer makes no statement as
validity of these claims, but
s this is- no time for trifling
taps to wipe out this infection
ectually prevent others from
g, may be necessary if thor-
vestigation proves that his sus-
are grounded.
LISH PROUD OF
MERICAN SPIRIT
obert Hadfield, one of the most
t metallurgists of Great Brit-
he present time, expressed the
at of the leading men among
tish Allies ii a letter to Prof.
Jamnpel, of the chemistry de-
nt. The following is an x-
rom Sir Robert Hadfield's let-
er my congratulations on the
cent way your countrymen
een fighting at the front; we
proud of them here as of our
ridlers.
i best wishes,
Yours sincerely,
Signed) R. A. HADFIELD."
s not only an unusually able
it but also one of the greatest
s of industry in England. He
he same time president of the
y society and the head of one
greatest steel corporations in
IS FROM INFLUENZA
EWER IN LAST TWO DAYS
ontinued from Page One)
ry, or to the Red Cross con-
ut hospital until he has fully
ed. After discharge, the men
igned to the special company
d at the old Michigan Union.
if the members of this com-
re given kitchen police, guard
or other strenuous work. The
y go on short hikes. The men
:harged from this company and
ck to their original company at
of a week. There are 43 men
d at the old Union building.
dare two senior medics at each
y, one nights, the other days.
are also graduate nurses on
for the convalescents and the

Barbour gymnasium is cook-
women volunteers. University
prepare the meals at Newberry
e Chi Psi house and the gym-
while the Ann Arbor chapter
Red gross cares' for the men
infirmary on Fifth avenue.
elicacies have been donated by
bor women for the men.
Work Union Hours -
ant Fischer has 150 men from
A of the S. A. T. C. working
rlies at the hospitals and in-
s. These men work eight hour
aily for a week.
efficiency of our system of
for the influenza victims is'
said Sergeant Fischer, "by
that we have had a lower per-
of deaths than at any other

yesterday morning as compared with
twice that number in the preceding
48 hours.
Two deaths occurred. Miss Lora
Higgins, pharmicist at the Homoeo-
pathic hospital died late Saturday
night. She was a graduate nurse of
that institution. She will be buried
in Manistee, Iter former home. The
other person who died was Emanual
Eschelbach of Chelsea, who was work-
ing in Ann Arbor.
Dr. W. E. Forsythe, University
health physician, believes that in spite
of several new cases the epidemic
among civilian students is being
brought under control.
University health officials are much
pleased with what they term "the ben-
efits of the gauze masks and the ex-
ercise of common sense methods of
safety."
WOMEN NEEDED TO
CARE FOR WOUNDED
In order to care for the sick and
wounded Michigan men who have re-
turned from France and are being
taken care of in New York, the Mich-
igan office of the war preparedness
board in New York has made a special*
appeal to the women of this state to
donate their services and resources.
These men in the hospitals are in
need of khaki bags to contain their
personal possessions. The Red Cross
has not taken up the matter of these
bags, due to the fact that they are so
busy sewing bandages and other med-
ical necessities. Mrs. L. P. Hall, chair-
man of the sewing at the local Red
Cross, said they had received no re-
quest for the bags up to this time.
She, expressed the desire that some
organization or individual would
volunteer to take charge of this mat-
ter.
The bags should be made of firm
cotton khaki cloth and should be made
21 inches long and 10 inches wide,
with a firm cord in the top for closing.

TRAIC SITUATION SEENI
IN CAUUSIN HUSSI
GEORGIA, CAUCASIAN REPUBLIC,
ALONE REMAINS UNCON-
QUERED
Moscow (Correspondence of the As-i
sociated Press.-Of all sad situations1
growing out of Russia's dismember-
ment, that in the Caucasus is most1
tragic. By the terms of the Brest-1
Litovsk peace treaty Russia ceded the
provinces of Kars and Batoum to
Turkey. But Caucasus, which is a
conglomeration of races, mountain
tribes and feuds, was as strongly op-
posed to Turkish domination as iti
was to Bolshevik rule.
The Armenian massacres still freshi
in their memories, the Caucasian peo-
ple refused to recognize the treaty
and united to fight Turkish aggres-
sion. But they were weak and un-
organized and could not withstand the
onslaught of superior Turkish armies
directed by German commanders.
Their position was still further aggra-
vated by persistent propaganda of the
Bolsheviki, who were anxious to rush
all opposition and sowed dissension
wherever possible.i
The hastily formed independent
Trans-Caucasian Republic soon crum-
bled to pieces, Georgia alone, of all
the component states, retaining a sem-
blance of government and declaring
itself an independent Republic. The
,new-born state was in no position to
fight the Turks single-handed and was
compelled to negotiate with Turkey,
a peace that virtually makes Georgia
,a Turkish protectorate.
"United Trans-Caucasia has ceased
to exist," writes I. Tzeretelli, a mem-
ber of the new Georgia government.
"The southern part of it, populated
mostly by Armenians, has been occu-
pied by the Turks; eastern Trans-Cau-
casia is willing to recognize volun-
tarily the power of the Sultan.
"Georgia is all that was saved from
free Trans-Caucasia that is not yet
enslaved by Turkey."
WR AT'S GOING ON
TODAY
7 P. M.-The Athena ;Literary so-
ciety will meet in room 404, Mason
hall.
7:30 P. M. -- Stylus meets at the1
home of Agnes True, 1020 South Un-
iversity avenue. Professor Rankin
will speak.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
FOR S. A. T. C. BAND
Here is a chance for some worthy
private to be excused from the labor-
ious task of K. P. Both sections of
the S. A. T. C. bands are open to mu-
sicians of medium and professional
ability. Band practice does not ne-
cessitate absence from drill, although
plans are under way to excuse mem-
bers from K. P.
It is estimated that the band will
be composed of not less than 100
pieces although less than this number
have been attending the rehearsals.
Trips to other towns will be arrang-
ed as soon as possible.
Quite a few professional musicians
are members, which speaks favorably
for the success of the organization.
Rehearsals are held at 4:30 on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The
men go directly from practice to the'
mess hall. Those interested should
report at rehearsal periods to Ser-
geant Heller on the second floor of the
Michigan Union building.
Detroit Wastes Tons of Meat Weekly
Detroit, Oct. 21.-By a recent in-
vestigation of the meat situation for
the government it was found that 29
tons of meat were wasted a week by
the Detroit markets. None of this is
thrown away as garbage but is made
into by-products. The government is
interested in using waste meat for
making glycerine for munitions.
New arrivals in Winter Millinery at
very special prices at the New Millin-
ery Parlors. Open Tuesday evenings.
618 Packard.-Adv.
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S, Main St.

No More Gasoline Stoves During War
Washington, Oct. 21.-The war in-
dustries board has declared its oppo-
sition to the manufacture of gasoline
stoves for the duration of the war
and has advised that the material once
used in the manufacture of them be
hereafter employed in making gas
heating and cooking devices.

.QUARRY'S
The most easily found and longest remembered DRUG STORE,
because of its peculiar location, and the careful attention you re-
ceive when you visit them.
They make a specialty of PRESCRIPTIONS, and all the things
needed in the SICK ROOM--as well as MICROSCOPICAL SUP-
PLIES needed by STUDENTS in the LABORATORIES.
They also remember many other needs. See Parker and Conk-
lin's Pens as well as Toilet Articles-in choice selections.
Quarry Drug Cos
Prrescription Store
COR. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 308
-MUSIC-

FOR LIBERTY
The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary forces:
killed in action, 104; missing in ac-
tion, 73; wounded severely, 355; died
from wounds, 37; total, 569.

PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-F1

I

Naval News

Yeoman J. F. Rutledge has arrived
here from Great Lakes to take the
measurements of the men in the naval
unit. He arrived here yesterday and
started to take measurements in the
morning. It is supposed that about
50 men a 'day will be measured from~
now on, as about that number were
measured yesterday.
There -were three less cases of in-
fluenza reported in the navy yester-
day.
WOMEN OF ANN ARBOR AID IN
CARING FOR INFLUENZA SICK
"The women are contributing their
services unreservedly," is the state-
ment made by Mrs. T. J. Keech, place-
ment chairman of the registration of
women under the direction of the
woman's committee of the Council of
National Defense, yesterday in speak-
ing of the activities of the women of
Ann Arbor during the present influ-
enza crisis.
Four women have been checking
up the registration cards of the wom-
en who either volunteered their serv-
ices gratis or were to be paid. Sev-
eral hundred names were found on
the list, but in checking them over, it
was found that many of the women
had moved out of town or had sickness
in their own family and were unable
to aid others at this particular time.
Neverthelss 50 women have been
freely contributing their services, giv-
ing from one to five hours daily wher-
ever they were needed.
No discrimination has been made
in the selection of work, hence many
of the most aristocratic women of the
city have been serving in the homes
where they were needed for waiting
on the sick and washing dishes.
FRENCH TRANSMIT GERMAN
NOTE TO PRESIDENT WILSON
(Continued from Page One)
developments, to await the perform-
ance of the promises of the Germans
not to .torpedo passenger ships, their
implied pledge to work no more de-
struction during their retreat through
Belgium and France than military
necessity requires, and, finally, to
await further development of the po-
litical leaven that evidently is work-
ing toward the complete overthrow of
military and autocratic powers in the
empire. No one believes that an im-
mediate cessation of hostilities is in
Sighsi
All Detroit Schools Closed
Detroit, 6,t, 21. - The indefinite
closing from Tburday on of all pub-
lic, private and p r-chxal schools in
Detroit was ordered by ihe board of
health today as a precautionary meas-
ure against Spanish influenza. Other
measures include the closing of retail
stores at 4 o'clock.

SAVE THE PIECES! Broken Eye Glass Li
ground in our own shop, same day. Try our serviee.
Eyes examined.

HALLER

&

FULLER

STATE STREET
JEWELERS

' ,

U '
-i
" _ ,.yam; ,

20

I

TURKISH CIGAPE TTES

Cents

ARE M1ADE

ESPECIALLY

II

j.IS RIr1INAT1NG AND EXPU ,"
~SMOKER OF HIGH GRAD)E
TURK~ISK CIGARETTES
Thwe 'bending'
is exce ptionatl
flAERSO~THE HIGHEST rGRADE TURKISN AfjV
EGYPTIAN GIGARETEb NTEWI

are just

2

x

'I)

k

x~

v}I
C>

like. meeting
Your Best Girl
face to face,
RE9'MEMBER There are no
others like your "B G."

'tom
r

oved in the city.

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