100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 27, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/

I MLb W EATHER
PROBABLY FAIR
TODAY

F
i

41P 411
itr t

Iat

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY iAND NIGHT WIRF
8ERV ICE

.:

U. ++ rr

r4

. XXIX. No. 169.

ANN ARBOR, THIC111-CLAN, TUESDAY, MAY 27, 1919.

PRICE THRUE

AN____ IH'G N T ED YM Y 27 99.P i_ H E

LONDON WILL GIVE
HAWKER RECEPTION
ON RETURN TODAY

RESCUED

AFTER 90
FLOATING
SEA

MINUTES OF
ON

GREATEST
HEROES

OF NATIONAL
AT PRESENT

Airman and Companion Land in Scot.
land Two Miles from
Thurso
(By Associated Press).
Thurso, Scotland, May 26.-Harry G.
Hawker and Lieut. Commander Mac-
Kenzie Grieve were warmly received
today when they landed from a torpe-
do boat destroyer at the Scrabster
Pier two miles from Thurso town. The
senior naval officer and the parish
counselors welcomed the rescued avia-
tors officially.
The aviators, who are the greatest
national heroes of the moment, landed.
at Thurso, Scotland, from the British
destroyer Revenge. The Revenge took
them from the Danish tramp steamer.
Mary, which picked them up in mid-
ocean, 800 miles ofd the Irish Coast,
early last Monday after they had been
forced to descend in the sea, where
they floated with their machine for 90
minutes,
An official reception will be given
Harry G. Hawker and Lieut. Com-
mander Grieve, the daring aviators
who had been given up as lost, when
they arrive in London tomorrow from
$ootland. The reception will take
plaqe at the Marylebone Station, ac-
oording to plans arranged today.
DEBATERS TO DEIDE
CHA9MPIONSHIP FRIDAY

Musical Clubs In
Wlirthday Concert
The Varsity Glee and Mandolin club
will hold its 60th Anniversary Con-
cert Friday, June 6, at Hill auditor-
ium, according to an announcement
made by the manager, Charles R.
Osius, Jr., '20, yesterday.
Favorites to Appear
More than 80 men comprise the club
this year, and many of them are for-
mer Glee club favorites. The old, pre-
war spirit will be the underlying mo-
tif of this year's appearance, and all
work of the club is being conducted
in accordance with this idea. Life and
"pep" are to predominate, the club's
officers say.
The Midnight Sons' quartet and the
Mandolin club's Jazz sextet are to
provide the principal popular numbers,
as usual, and a Fussers' Dozen will
be an added "jazz" group. The Var-
sity quartet and the Varsity sextet
are to appear in the select numbers
on the program. Contrary to custom,
these sections are being given inten-
sive training. Both the Glee and
Mandolin clubs are also holding extra
rehearsals to insure an excellent con-
cert.
Dance Follows Concert
A Glee and Mandolin club 60th Anni-
versary Dance will be held at the
Union after the concert. Diamond's
Union orchestra will play. The dance
is to be open to the entire campus,
and members of the club are to be the
guests of honor.
The entire evening of June 6 is to
be a Glee and Mandolin club "birth-
day party," according to the manager's
plans.
Despairing Wits
Rely On Lovell

SUCCESSES' FROM
PREVIOUS SHOWS
VAUDEVILLE GIVEN TO MEET
EXPENSES INCURRED ON
MANY TRIPS
PLAN ORIGINAL ACTS
BY ALL PARTICIPANTS
Competition Keen Among Contestants
in Ticket Selling Race for
Chicago Trip
To settle the heavy expenses incur-
red by the Varsity band on the many
trips that it has made in aiding pa-
triotic demonstrations, the Band
Bounce will be held tonight in Hill
auditorium.
Seven Acts on Program
A seven act vaudeville including mu-
sic, magic, mystery, and impersona-
tions is so well rehearsed and the
"props" so well drilled that the first
skit is promised to begin promptly at
8 o'clock. The actors have been pick-
ed from the men that scored the larg-
est success at the Spotlight and other
shows. Although the personnel is al-
ready known to the campus the songs,
tricks, and take-off subjects are all
new. The big feature of the perform-
ance is promised in the band. Favor-
ite Michigan songs and music will be
rendered with the "Victors" leading.
Record Audience Expected

VICTORY IN HARVARD CLASSIC RESTS ON
DECISION OF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
T. F. McALLISTER
Will Michigan win the great eastern intercollegiate track meet at Har-
vard this week?
Undoubtedly the prospect for vie tory of the Maize and Blue in the na-
tional classic is rosier this year than it has been for many seasons in the
past. Michigan's showing in the Conference indoor meet, and her overtow-
ering supremacy during this spring in the West place her among the fore-
most contenders for the American laurels.
Michigan can win! And Michigan will win, if our track men are given
half a chance. Big newspapers in tna East have already picked the Ann
Arbor men for the dangerous dark horse combination, and the sport writ-
ers of the West are beginning to score Michigan in first place. With no other
Conference teams entered, the ancient "Big Ten," rivals in our own cir-
cuit, are placing their hope in Coach Farrell's aggregation to justify west-
ern claims to sporting pre-eminence.
Victory hinges principally on one thing, - the number of men Michigan
will send.yUndisputably, the Wolverines will pick up a number of firsts,
our pretensions to the weights, and the dashes, giving this confidence. But
firsts have never won any meet. In fact, intercollegiates have been mainly
won by men who placed.
. Michigan has men who can grab the firsts. And she also has the ath-
letes who can cut in on placing. Michigan can win if every man who has
a reasonable chance of scoring a point is sent to Harvard.
And that matter is now in the hands of the Athletic association for
speedy and final disposal. If it is a matter of finance, campus entertain-
ments can afterward fill the athletic coffers to the necessary amount. But
these men who have worked hard for the University, and who have finally,
after much grinding and unremunerative work, succeeded in placing Michi-
gan -on top of the West, must in all justice be sent to help conquer the,
East.

Will Michigan win? Rather, will
to help bring back the first American
loss of such a victory rests upon the
done his work.
Athletic office! - it's up to you!

these crack trackmen go to Harvard
honors? The responsibility for the
Athletic association. Coach Farrell has

MICHIGAN WALLOPS
PURDUENINE 10-0
Langenhan Connects with Horsehide
for an Average of
.800
GLENN HOLDS ENGINEERS TO
7 HITS AND STRIKES OUT 19

LANTERN NIGHTr
P ROVES S UCCESS.
Sweaters, Silver Pins, and Arm Bands
Awarded for Honor Points
Gained in Sports
GAMES PRECEDE FESTIVAL OF
LANTERNS AND FLOWERS

YANKEE TROOPS~
READY TO MOVE'-
FROM ARCHNE
ifEMBERS OF 339TH INF, NOW
WAITING FOR THEIR
ORDERS
NO FURTHER DELAY BY
GERMANS ON TREATY
Assures French Government That No
Longer Extension Is
Needed
(By Associated Press)
Washington. May 26.-Withdrawal
of the American forces from Archangel
is actually under way, according to
reliable advices to the war depart-
ment today, which state that all mem-
bers of the 339th Infantry were await-
Ing evacuation.
The cablegram also said that the re-
turn of individual soldiers in accord-
ance with a recent request of the de-
partment would not expedite the dis-
charge of such casuals since their
units would arrive home before these
individuals.
Paris, May 26.- The French govern-
ment has received from the German
peace delegation the assurance that it
will ask no further extension of time
for consideration of peace terms. The
extension granted last week expires
Thursday.
Washington, May 26.-The continued
unsettled state of international affairs
has led the war department to decide
definitely to resubmit the army bill
which failed to pass in the last con-
gress, Secretary Baker said toda. r
This measure provides for a temporary
force of about 530,000 officers and men.
London, May 26.-Esthonlan troops
have taken the important railway junc-
tion of Pskov, between Riga ad ero-
grad, accordingeto ports rom He
singfors received in Cpenhagendand
transmitted by the Exchange Tele-
graph company.
As a result of the Esthoniln's sur-
prise attack last week, when the Borl-
shevik positions on the Pskov front,
were broken through, and the threat
to the line of communication between
Petrograd and Pskov, tze Bolshevik
are retiring from their positions on the
northwestern front. The new positions
are about six and 'two thirds miles:
east of Riga.
The Esthonian staff reported the
capture of 1,000 prisoners and many
cannon and machine guns. At the
last report the Bolsheviki and the
Letts were contesting for possession
of Riga and the retirement of the Bol-
shevik to new positions east of that
city may indicate their forced evacua-
tion of it.
Late Wire Briefs

"If there is a job to
the man to do it, and
you that I will do it
Dr. Tom Lovell to the

be done, I am
I can promise
well," replied
question as to

DURAND - EAST JORDAN

HIR !

SCHOOLS TO CONTEST
THIS YEAH
In the second annual championship
debate of the Michigan high schpol de-
bating league which will take place
t 8o'clock Friday evening -inS~arah
Qaswell Angel hall, opportunity will
b0 given campus debaters and others.
interested in public speaking to note
future University debating material. At
this time the high schools of Durand
and East Jordan will debate the mini-
Mum. wage for unskilled labor in the
state of Michigan bill. Durand will
debate the armative and East Jordan
theg negative.
Eeague Prfits University
In its second year of existence, or-
ganized by Mr.R ay I. Immel as one
of the branches of University exten-
sign service, the league now numbers'
more than 70 state high schools, One
of the main purposes of the organiza-
tton is to act as g feeder to Univer-
sity debating material. Euperience has
proved this end partially attained, for
among the campus debaters today are
two former members of championship
teams in this league. -
"The debate of last year ranked high
among high school public speak-
ing work," said Mr. Immel yesterday.
'It was the cleanest cut contest of its
kind I have ever heard. The speak-
ing was remarkably good and the
English perfect."'
Prof. lenderson Ito Preside
President Harry B. Hutchins had
signified his intention of presiding at
the contest but he has been unexpect-
edly called to New York on that day.
In his place Prof. W. D. Henderson
will preside. Judges for the contest
will be Prof. T. C. Trueblood, Prof.
. I. Kraus, and Dr. Arthur G. Hall.
Mupb interest is being manifested
l the coming debate since Ruth Hus-
tPu, , g charter memper of the
Atena }iterary society and prominent
WbilP i college IR public speaking
yW'jr Is coaph of the Duran delega-
tigg. Mr. M. 4. Keyworth, who last
year brpght the Qaylord team which
We second honors, is coaching the
ie Jprdan teamn this ye.r.
$r0m1eoli n Violeit Eruption
borpn, Italy, I4iay 26.-The volcano
l ttrpombpli on i e Island qf that
npie, off the coast of Sicily was in
yiplent eruption eagt night. Numer-
ous victhns are ropprte.
REPORT ON BOUNCE TICKETS
All ticket sales chairmen sell-
ing tickets for the Band Bounce
must have their tickets in and
settle up at the box office at I
Hill auditorium by 7:30 o'clock I

whether he is slated to pitch for the
gargoyle in its baseball game with The
Daily Friday morning,
"I still have got some swing is this
right arm," said the celebrated lit-
erary man to the interviewer. The
latter stood back whil4 the Doctor
removed his silk hat and went through
the motions of fanning opposing play-
era. Dr. Lovell also placed himself on,
record as being quite willing to um-
pire if popular opinon should de-
mand it.
Dispute as to Unwire
Rumor has it that the gargoyle will
resort to any means, fair or foul, to
come out victorious in this struggle.
One plan has already been uncovered
by The Daily sleuths; that of placing
on display beside third base maiqy of
their censored drawing;s to attract the
interest of base-runners when on the'
point of going home, The Daily staff
is of such moral calibre, however,1
that anything questionable would only
hurry it toward the plate. And Dr.
Lovell, as umpire, would see to it1
that such methods were ruled out.
Nevertheless The Daily aggregation
is strongly in favor of securing
Claude Washburn, the linotype man
and general overser of the publica,
tion, to officiate, as night editors are
generally cognizant of his mild Arm-
ness and eagle eye.j
Daily Invents New Cheers
Nine new cheers have been prepar-
ed for the occasion by the newspaper
men, and vigOrous rooting is looked
for. The ex-Gaillotine editor, who de-
serted the realms of the literary fqr
the abode of the quasi-humlorous, Is
reported to be slaving night and 4ay
without success for material wItil
which to compose a gargoyle yell.
Steady practice for both teams has
been going on for the last two weekst
and a highly technical an4 mystify-
ing engagement is predieted by thet
dopesters. A erwd of several thou-
ands has already signifier its inen
tion of atten4ing.

Calculations based on the number of'
tickets already sold and those "prom-
*ide" show at'record crowd will cram
the auditorium to -hear the best that
the campus has to offer.
B. R. D'ooge, '19, chief promoter of
the Bounce, said Monday, "Competi-
tion among the ticket sellers has, come
to an exciting climax. A number of
the men are running neck and neck
and the outcome of the race is dubious.
The trip to Chicago offered to the
winner has spurred on the sales at a
surprising rate. The finish will be
close and hotly contested."
DEAN POLICY PASSED
BY UNIVERSITY SENATE
PROPOSITION NOW GOES TO RE-
GENTS FOR FINAL
ACTION

The Dean of Men resolution success-
fully passed the . University Senate at
a meeting held last night in the Law
building, and was then voted by that
body to present it with recommenda-
tions to the Board of Regents, who
have final say in the matter.
This action of the University Sen-
ate followed that of the Senate council
which had already passed the new
policy. At the first May meeting of
the University Senate three weeks ago,
it was voted to refer the proposition
to a committee composed of the
deans of the University. After a care-
ful investigation and consideration of
the proposed policy, the committee
favorably reported it back to the Sen-
ate last night, that body passing it
with little discussion.
ITALY LANDS MORE
TROOPS IN TURKEY
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 26.-The Italiargs have'
effected a further lancling of troops
at Sokia, in Asia Minor, 60 miles south
east of Smyrna.
The Turkish government has pro-
tested to the peace conferelice against
the landing. It also has expressed re-
gret that the Greeks were permitted
to occupy fmyrna saying they-govern-
ment felt it would have been wiser
to have had a joint allied occupation.
The protest says it is feared that
trouble will insue as the advance into
the interior-of the country continues.

Michigan's basebal nine, in support
of Glenn on the mound, chalked its
sixth consecutive Conference victory
by shutting out Purdue, 10 to0, in a
Wolverine slugging rally, Monday aft-
ernoon on- Ferry field,
Outfielder Gets Four Hits
Langenhan headed the list of Lund-
gren's batsmen who spent the after-
noon in locating the curves of Loebig
for a substantial fattening of batting
averages. The Maize and Blue center
fielder was excluded from opportunity
to prove his ability at his garden
post and took advantage of his five
occasions at the plate to corner four
of the 14 safties tallied by his team.
Although several of the home team's.
hits were of the infield variety in the
line of successful bunts and drives
beyond the immediate control of the
Engineer advance guards, Bowerman
and Langenhan connected for extra
sacks and the whole lineup gave its
best exhibition of the year in discern-
ing between the good and bad ones.
Glenn Shows Old Form
Glenn, whose arm has been giving
him considerable trouble during the
season, handled the Purdue aspirants
at the bat in creditable fashion, strik-
Ing out 13 and allowing but five hits.
The Ann Arbor representative on the
slab was inclined towards wildness at
times and issued four passes but was
able to tighten up when' necessary and
(Continued on Pafe Three)

With an immense M of lighted jack
o' lanterns borne by senior women in
caps and gowns, and flowered hoops
carried by girls of the junior class,
Lantern night culminated last even
ing in a combination of enthusiasm
and beauty that will insurq its future
success as a college tradition.
Crowds Congregate Early
Early in the evening crowds began
to con regate on thehills surround-
ing Palmer field where* the celebra-
tion was held. An old English May
pole dance, accompanied by the Mar-
tha Cook orchestra, opened the even-
ing's festivities. Immediately after
the dance, the Lantern march was
formed, the seniors passing with
lighted lanterns underneath an arch-
way of flowered hoops held by the jug.
niors. Led by Jane Duemling and
Doris McDonald, they formed the
block M.
After class songs, Miss Grace Green-
wood addressed the assembled wom-
en of the University in a speech ex-
pressing high commendation of the
work of the physical education de-
partment. Miss Greenwood said in
part: "The physical education de-
partment is one of the greatest in the
University. The spirit of play is a
unit in all University life that cannot
be ignored. As long as traditions last
this one will be remembered with all
seriousness and honor. Miss Wood
and Miss Dawley have worked inces-
santly to make their department a.
success and with the splendid co-ope-
rationfrom the student body, there
are no limitations to the depart-
ment."

Sgma Xi To. Hold
Annual Initation
Sigma Xi, national honorary sqien-
tific society, will hold its annual in-
itiation and banquet at 7 o'clock this
evening on the third floor of the Mich-
igan Union. Prof. John F. Shepard of
the psychology department will give
an address on . Applied Psychology in
the War."
Any resident members of the so-
ciety who have not received notices
of this meeting are requested to com-
municate with the secretary, Dr. H. H.
Willard, who will add their names to
the mailing list. Members may obtain
tickets at the door. The price is 41.

An exclusive dispatch from Paris
to the Associated Press last night said
it had been learned. in trustworthy
quarters of the French capitol that
the United States, Great Britian, and
France have united in sending a note
to Italy requesting an explanation
of the landing of the Italian forces
in Turkey.
LT. BARNETT, EX-'19, ARRIVES
IN ANN ARBOR FROM FRANCE
Lieut. Lester C. Barnett, ex-'19, ar-
rived in Ann Arbor Monday after 18
months' service overseas. As a pri-
vate and sergeant in the 32 division
Barnett' saw action in Alsace, Cha-*
teau Thierry, Sossoins, and the Ar-
gonne, being commissioned shortly aft-
er the signing of the armistice.

PEACE LEAGUE IS
DANGER TO WHITES
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 26. - An attack
on the league of nations, as offering
grave dangers to the future of the
white peoples of the world, was made
in the senate today, by Senator Reed,
democrat from Missouri, who declared
that under the covenant in its present
form, nations governed by other races
would have the predominating voice.
The senator presented statistics to
show that of the .total population of
the countries composing the league;
811,425,500 would be black, yellow,
brown, and red races, with only 289,-
488,800 of the white race. In the as-
sembly which is to be the governing
body he said white nations would
have 15 representatives and other
nations 17 representatives.
' Regina Saskatchewan, May 26. - A
general strike went into effect today
In Calgary and Edmonton, the two
largest cities, next to Winnipeg, in
the Prairie provinces. Every trade
.unionists in the two cities walked out
at 11 o'clock in sympathy with the
Winnipeg strikers.
Copenhagen, May 26.-The Hunga-
rian army command at Budapest an-
nounces that the "enemy" is withdraw-
ing southeast of Budapest in a disor-
derly manner. It says the 61st Ru-
manIan regiment was almost wiped
out.

Athletic Honors Awarded
Athletic honors were awarded by
Miss Greenwood and the results of
field events were announced. The
freshmen were victorious in the cham-
pionship baseball game, defeating the
juniors by a score of 11 to 8. Semi-
finals in tennis resulted in the match
being won by Marguerite Rothschae-
-fer, '21. Archery class honors were
won by the juniors. The highest in-
dividual scores were made by Eleanor
Brown, '22, with 97 points and Dorothy
True, '21, with 88.
Three Sweaters Presented
Sweaters, representing 100 honor
points gained in field sports, were
awarded to Lucile Duff, '19, Phyllis
Egglestone, '19, Elsie Erley, '20, and
Priscilla Butler, '19. Silver pins with
insignia were won by Jane Dueml-
ing, '19, Phyllis Wiley,' 21, Ella Rass-
.mussen, '19, and Anna Kirkpatrick,
'20, for 50 honor points. Constance
Hopkins, '20, was awarded an arm
band for earning 30 points.
True to tradition, the seniors hand-
ed down their lanterns to the juniors
who in turn passed on their flowered
hoops to the sophomores. Finally all
classes united in singing "The Yellow
and the Blue," accompanied by the
artha Cook orchestra.
Volcano Eruption Kills 18,000 People
Tokio, May 26.- Sixteen thousandI
persons were killed or injured in a
volcanic eruption in central Java on
May 20. This information is contain-
ed in official advices from Batavia.-

(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 26.-The council of four
today began consideration of the Bul-
garian peace terms.
The president of China has notified
the Chinese delegation by cable that
a meeting of the Chinese cabinet and
the speakers of both houses author-
ized the delegation to sign the treaty
with reservation regarding Shantung.
Washington, May 26.-Efforts to ex-
pedite a vote of the senate today on
the woman suffrage constitutional
amendment resolution were defeated.
By parliamentary tactics opponents
of the measure succeeded, After two
hours, in postponing all action until
tomorrow.
Paris, May 26.-The German peace
plenipotentiaries this morning handed
two new notes to the secretary of the
peace conference. They had to do
with the subjects of internal legisla-
tion regarding labor problems and Ger-
man properties in allied countries.
New York, May 26.-Uninterrupted
production of "war beer" until the
courts have passed upon the claim of
the United States Brewers' association
that the beverage containing 2 3-4 al-
cohol is non-intoxicating, was assured
today when " Federal Judge Mayer
granted an injunction restraining gov-
ernment interferenge with its manu-
facture.
The court declared that this decision
had been influenced by President
Wilson's message to Congress com-
mending repeal of the war-time prohi-
bition act, in so far as it relates to beer
and wine, and by Federal Judge Hand's
rulipg last week that the law placed
a ban on the manufacture only -of
liquors that were,-in fact, intoxicating.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan