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May 25, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-25

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
SHOWERS.

'Y

Sitt iwan

lIaitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY A"D NIGHT WiRE
SERVICE

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 168 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 25, 1919. PRICE THREE CENT
I _ 1

NO YIELDING TO
GEIRMANY ON ANY
TREATY POINTS

CLAUSES IN RIgFERENCE
SARRE VALLEY ARE
DISPUTED
GREECE MAY TAKE

TO

CONTROL IN TURKEY
Constantinople May Be Placed Under
an International Commis.
sien
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 24. - The indications
thus far are that the allied and asso-
ciated powers are not yielding any
material points in the peace treaty
handed to Germany in order to be se-
cure in the signing of the document,
although considerable changes in de-
tails are being made..
This policy of the conferees is no-
ticeable in regard to clauses of the
peace treaty dealing with the Sarre
Valley, which has been one of the
main points of contention in notes be-
tween the German representatives and
the allies which have not yet been
made public.
The Germans have held that French
use of the coal fields might be justi-
fled, but the French political control
of the Sarre population was "odi.
ous."
The only yielding by allies on the
Sarre Valley terms is with the pur-
pose of making the administration of
the district more workable. There
has been no change in the general
principles of control by the league of
nations.
Paris, May 24.--President Wilson has
informed the council of four ,it is re,
ported in peace conference circles to-
day, that the other members of the
council should be prepared for the
United States not to take a mandate
for Constantinople, or any part of
Turkey.
This is interpreted not as a per-
sonal inclination of the president
against the mandate, but as a precau-
tion in case Congress does not a-
prove of the mandate.
The reported stand of the Presi-
dent has had the effect of stating two
distinct movements, with relation to
the Turkish problem. The first is to.
place Constantinople under an in-
ternational commission in which all
the great powers would have a voice.
The second plan is based on the as-
sumption that if the rivalry among the
great powers of Europe make it in-
expedient for Great Britain, France,
or Italy, to accept the mandate it
wopild go to Greece with the support
of the great powers.
Premier Venizelos of Greece has let'
it be known that he is not urging this
plan, but that Greece is ready to as-
sume the mandate if neither the Unit-
ed States or the international commis-
sion is prepared to assume responsi-
bility.

THINK HAWKER'S
MESSAGE A FAKE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 24.-The Navy t)-
partmient made public today a report
from. New London, Connecticut, sky-
ing that a bottle had been picked up
three miles south of Narragansett
Pier, containing a message purport-
ing to have been written by Harry
Hawker, who was lost in an attempt-
ed flight across the Atlantio. The
message said:
S"May 19, 1919, 1:14 . m. AAidenl
to plane and I am drifting in a col-
lapsed boat. Lat. 61 degrees, 30 4 in-
utes north; longitude, 15 degrees, 90
minuteswets. Signed, Hawker."
Secretary Daniles said he believed
the message was a fake, Navy de.
partment officials said the bottle prob-
ably was thrown overboard from a
cOastwise steamer.
HIGH SCHOOL MEN
HEAR OF MICHIGAN
Prof. John R. Brumm Digeusses Ideals
and Opportunities of
University
SECRETARY SMITH EXPLAINS
VALUE OF LITERARY COLLEGE

High school seniors from places
throughout the country, listened to
talks given by the faculty and stu-
dents, explaining the educational op-
portunities and various campus activ-
ities, Saturday morning at Lane hall.
Professor Brumm Speaks
After the invocation by Dr. T. M.
Iden and Rev. Charles T. Webb, Prof.
John R. Brumm spoke -on "Michigan
Ideals." He defined an educated man
as "'one who does what he ought to
do, when he ought to do it, whether
he wants toor not.' A student entering
the University will meet challenges
.on all sides, moral, physical, intellect-
ual, and religious," he said, "and in
meeting and overcoming these chal-
lenges lies the most important part of
a college education."
Tells of Colleges
Secretary Shirley W. Smith spoke
next on "The University and Its Col-
leges." He said that when he went to
college there were only three profes-
sions open to the student, medicine,
law, and the ministry, but that now
there are a great many more courses
offered and a man may become a spec-
ialist in almost any profession that
interests him. Any man who has not
decided upon his vocation was advised
'to go to the literary college where
any special ability of his will be de-
veloped,
Earl Miles was the last speaker and
told of the work done by the churches
of Ann Arbor, and then of the expens-
es of the freshman for tuition, books,
board and room.

EASTERN OF DETROIT, TAKES
SECOND WITH TWENTY.
TWO POINTS
MAJOR RECORDS HIGH
SINGLE SCORE TOTAL
Battle Creek and Detroit Northwestern
Finish Third and Fourth
Among Teams
Michig n's nineteenth interscholas-
tic track meet held Saturday, May 24,
at Ferry field was won by Champaign,
Ill., high school.
Champaign also takes home the cup
for greatest number of individual
points, Major, the star of the meet,
winning 16 points for his school.
Grime of Archbold, O., high school
came second with ten and one-half
points and Neisch of Detroit Eastern,
third with ten points.
Chicago Time Equalled
The weather was perfect for a track
meet and many good races were run.
Cooper of Detroit Central, ran the mile
in the same time as that of the Chi-
cago-Michigan meet. Weeks of Battle
Creek, ran a pretty half mile in 2:03
and 3-5, In fact the time for every
event was exceptionally fast for inter-
scholastic work.
The following cups were awarded:
Winning team cup-presented by
Michigamua, Champaign, Ill.; second
place in meet-Detroit Eastern; indi-
vidual points-Major of Champaign;
second number of individual points-
presented by Sphinx-Grime of Arch-
bold, 0.; Huston Bros.' cup to be kept
permanently by the team winning the'
relay race three times, was captured
temporarily by Detroit Northwestern.
The Sid Millard cup to be kept perm-
anently by the team winning the meet+
three times, was taken temporarily by
Champaign, Ill.
The scoring by schools was as fol-
lows: Champaign, Ill., 29; Detroit+
Eastern, 22; Battle Creek, 20; Detroit
Northwestern, 17; Kalamazoo Central,
12 /; Detroit Central, 11; Archbold,
O., 10%; Grand Rapids South, 9;1
Springfield, Ill., 8; Cass City, 7; Grand
Rapids Central, 5; Grand Rapids Un-
ion, 3.
Event Summariesf
Scoring by events-100-yard dash-
Platt, Kalamazoo, first; Hodde, Spring-
field, second; Sweet, Battle Creek;i
(Continued on Page Three)

LUNDGREN'S MEN CROSS
SEVEN TIMES IN
FOURTH

CHAPINWINS INTERSCHOLASTIC;
iMICHIGAN DEF[TS IWA NINE 11-1
IN FIFTH BIG TEN DIAMOND VICTORY

PLATE

WESTERNERS REGISTER
LONE COUNT ON ERROR
McIntyre, Cornhusker's Pitcher, Hits
Bowerman with Ball Three
Times
Iowa fell for the second time before
the unbeaten Michigan baseball team,
Saturday afternoon on Ferry field by'
the score of 11 to_ 1, in a game of
manyerror . Iowa particularly seem-
ed to have a marked ability at booting
the sphere about the diamond and of1
the 11 runs that Michigan scored but
four were earned.
Parks' Pitching Air-Tight
Parks pitched an air-tight battle
and but three of the visitors got to
him for safe hits. A bad throw by
Karpus in the first inning after two
were out let in the Cornhuskers' only
tally. Two slips, one by Karpus and
the other by Garrett filled the bases
in the eighth but after Iowa threat-
ened to score the Wolverines pulled
themselves together cutting off one
man at the plate and Parks striking
out another, that retiring the side.
These were the only times that Mich-
igan was in a hole and 4 nning after
inning went by without a visitor see-
ing second.
Michigan Ties Score
Michigan tied the score in the third
inning. After two were out Knode
walked, stole second and third in suc-
cession and came in on Cooper's in-
field hit.
The next inning saw the Wolverines
score seven runs. Iowa went to piec-
es in a moment. McIlre hit Bower-
man with the ball, gave one pass and
let four of Lundgren's clan get to him
for clean hits. These along with two
errors let Michigan bat around and
score runs almost at will. .
- Scoring Continues
It seemedi that the Wolverines had
the habit for two' runs were scored
in the next inning on four safeties, and
one more came in the sixth. For the
rest of the game McIlre settled down
and allowed no more runs or hits.
The bigger part of the blame for
such a large score rests on the shoul-
ders of Iowa's pitcher and first-base-
(Continued on Page Three)

GERMANSANXIOUS
TO SIGN TREATY
(By Associated Press)
London, May 24.-The German gov-
ement at present is sincerely anxi-
ous to conclude peace and to sign the
allied terms, according to the views
of the Rotterdam correspondent of the
Daily Telegraphi, formed from recent
events in Germany.
The only thing the German ,govern-
ment is looking for is some alteration
in the terms which it can interpret
to the German people, as a concession
in order to say that the treaty no
longer retains the form which made
it unacceptable.
"The Germans will, in short, unless
a quite unexpected internal upheaval
occurs, end by accepting the unac-
ceptable," the correspondent said.
BREVI-TY AND WIT

FEATURE BOUNCE

Many
in'

Campus Favorites Will Appear
Varsity Band Show Tuesday
Night

LAST ACT WILL BE SHROUDED
IN MYSTERY AUTHORITIES SAY
Short and snappy!
With this as its slogan, the 1919
Band Bounce committee promises one
of the best aggregations of vaudeville
acts that has ever been presented for
the benefit of Michigan's Varsity band.
The Band Bounce will be held at 8
o'clock Tuesday night in Hill audi-
torium, and While the bill has been
kept down to seven acts, it is assur-
ed that the quality of these will
make the event one long to be remem-
bered.
Guest to Appear Again
The Varsity band will, of course, oc-
cupy a prominent place on the pro-
gram, and has developed a repertoire
of unusually snappy numbers. Leslie
Guest, a proven master of legerde-
main, will present a series of new and
mystifying experiments in magic.
That Archie McDonald, '19, Michi-
gan's premiere impersonator,,is on the
bill should contribute much to the
filling of the auditorium. McDonald
will be remembered for his clever take-'
offs of various professors and campus
celebrities in the Spotlight vaude-
ville, and it is evident that his field
is large enough to allow constant
changes in his act,
Inevitable Jazz Billed
Phil Diamond will be on hand with
his jingling jazz octette to supply
the ever-essential syncopation, and
Vernon Foote, '22E, has been secured
for a singing and banjo-ukelele num-
ber. Comment on these performers is
hardly necessary.
Harry Bennett has written a skit,
"Michigan in 1931," which will be
presented by eight men, and will give
an idea of what our younger brothers
will have to cope with when they come
to Ann Arbor some 12 years hence.-
Last Act a Surprise
The concluding act is to remain aj
mystery. It is announced as a genu-
ine surprise for the audience and one
which cannot be done justice in the
printed word. The only way to make
sure of "getting in" on the secret, is
to go to any of the campus book stores
and Invest in a ticket to the Band
Bounce.
Tickets may also be secured from
any wearers of the BB tags. The
ticket selling is being done on a!
competitive basis, and the two high1
men will be rewarded with a trip to
Chicago with the Varsity football or
track team. Proceeds are to go into
the Varsity band fund.
FRESHMAN SERIOUSLY HURT
IN CAP-NIGHT EXERCISES

STUDENT OPINION
FAVOHS DEAN OF
MEN RESOLUTIOI
MAJORITY OF STUDENTS S
NECESSITY OF SUCH AN
OFFICE
ADVERSE VIEW BASED
ON POSSIBLE EFFECT
Believes Ofice ,Would Make Greato
Gap Between Student wit
Faculty
Of the students interviewed on th
Dean of Men proposition, the greate
majority firmly believe that in orde

Monday Set For
Lantern Night

Paris, May 24.-Luther G. X. Chang
and C. W. Wang, two of the ranking
Chinese delegation, said today that
they would probably sign the treaty,
with the reservation stating that they
do not waive their claim for te
transfer of German rights in Shan-
tung to China direct, and do not rec-
ognize the transfer to Japan. The Chi-
nese are unable to sign the treaty
without reserve because the situation
in China is acute, but they are eager
to see China become a member of the
league of nations and to share the
benefits coming from the opium agree-
ment.
SEVENTH TRADE CONVENTION
TO TAKE PLACE AT FRISCO
The Seventh National Foreign
Trade Convention will be held at San
Francisco May 12, 13, 14, 15, 1920,
according to an official announcement
of the National Foreign Trade CouzL-
cil. San Francisco was chosen in rec-
ognition of the growing importanee
of the West, and western exporting
and importing. Previous conventions
have been held at Washington, New
Orleans, St. suis, Pittsburg, Cincin-
nati, and Chicago.
1 +
GIRLS MUST CALl CLUB
Sororities and dormitories that
wish to entertain the Varsity
I Glee and Mandolin club during
I its annual serenade may ar-
I range for a visit of the club by
c calling the manager at the of-
Bees, 244-R, between 2 and 4
I o'clock daily. The serenade tour
will be made Tuesday and Wed-
I nes evenings, June 2 and 4.

Lantern night, the old tradition
which will be revived Monday even.
e -ing will contain many spectacular
events. The public is cordially in-
vited to both Field day and Lantern
night.
The procession, which will begin
directly after the Maypole dance, will
be headed by Jane Duemliug and
'Doris McDonald, seniors, and Mar-
guerite Chapin and Laura Peacock,
juniors.
The freshmen and half the seniors
will form at the west end of Palmer
field, directly back of the told house,
the sophomores and the remainder of
the seniors will form at the east end
of the field. The juniors will assem-
ble on the little hill at the north of
the field, near the 60 yard line.
Seniors March I Juniors
The seniors, led by the sophomores
and freshmen, will then march to
meet the juniors who will hold up
their hoops under which the senior.s
will pass. When the seniors pass on
down to form the block "K," they will
turn and hand down their lighted lan-
terns to the juniors.
While in this formation the differ-
ent classes will sing their songs and
the juniors will pass their hoops on
down to the sophomores.
To Play O8 Championship
Field day will beheld in the after-
noon. The championship baseball
game will be played between junior-
freshmen. There will be a tennis
match and also an archery tourna-
nent in which the following women
have been entered: Dorena Norton,
'19, Helen Campbell, '20,and sopho-
mores, Eva Anderson, Dorothy True,
Helen Murphy, Ruby Ayres, Margery
Lee Post and Mary Langdon; fresh.
men, Eleanor Brown, Dorothy Gos-
pel, Violet Foster, Nellie Russey,
Winifred O'Connor, Ether Lorene
Wright, Lelia Witter, Olive Hurlburt.

1
y
f
i
J
x
t
t

ARMY IS BASIS OF
NEW GOVERNMENT
(By Associated Press)
Zurich, Switzerland, May 24. - A
military oligarchy is being formed in
Germany, according to Dr. Richard
Grelling, the author of "J'Accuse,"
who has just returned from Munich.
The oligarchy is more powerful than
the Scheidemaun government, the.
government only remains in power
with the support of the military caste
and mercenary troops.
"The army created by the govern-
ment," Dr. Grelling continued, "is
well diseiplined, well fed, and well
paid. The government can no longer
act at its desire because it can do
nothing aganist the will of the ten-
erals who tolerate the present cab-
inet only for the lack of a more suit-
able one. The military case is not
yet thinking of the restoration of the
monarchy, but who can say what will
happen later?"
In discussing the peace terms, Dr.
Grelling said they were no more thanj
they could have expected in view
of the ruin and devastation brought

about by the German army. He criti-
cized the speeches delivered by Count
Von Brockdorff-Rantzau at Versailles
and by President S. Fehrenbach be-
fore the National Assembly, in which
both refused to admit the responsi-
bility of Germany. Dr. Grelling con-
cluded by saying that such declara-
tions were false and have l1ttla
weight and showed that their authors
had not learned anything.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ELICTS
OFFICERS FOR ENSUING YIAR
Officers for the Cosmopolitan club
for 1919-1920 were elected Saturday
night as follows: President, A. M. U2-
kind, '19; board of directors, students,
Sotokiehi Katsuizumi, grad., Herman
K. Grunwaldt, '20, Hsiu C. Tung,
'20, and Paul A. Shinkman, '20; faeul-
ty, Prof. J. A. Hildner and Mr. Ralph
M.Carson; townsmen, Mr. Roy C. Ja-
cobson, and Mr. T. Lowrie.
The annual banquet of the men's
and women's Cosmopolitan clubs will
be held at 7 o'clock, Friday, May 29,
at the Nickels Arcade cafeteria. In-
formal dancing will follow the ban-
quet.

to make possible a more sympathetic
understanding between the faculty and
the male students of the University,
such an officer is necessary. The fol-
lowing are a few of the expressed at-
titudes on the question:
Donald M. Springer: A Dean of
Men, of proper calibre, can forin a very
important link between the faculty
and the student body. There i much
need for this office.
Means Closer Relation
Carl T. Hogan: The establishment
of the chair of Dean of Men would
do much toward bringing about a clos
er relation and a better understanding
between the students and the faculty.
It would make possible the consider-
ation and adoption of a great many
improvements in the student life.
Stephen S. Attwood: A splendid op-
portunity would be presented to the
proposed Dean of Men to draw the
loose ends of the campus activityto
gether- into a homogeneous organisa-
tion working more efficiently for a
greater University, and to produce a
better understanding between the fac-
ulty and the student body. A position
of this type would fill a long felt need.
Apprecite Sueh Need
Laurel A. Lundquist: The Dean of
Men is exactly what the Univeral
needs. Under our present system, all
non-athletic activities are. seriously
handicapped because of the system of
complete, change in administration
each yea. Through the Dean of Men
the officers each year could gain the
experience of those of previous years.
J. Erwin Goodwillie: I believe any
action to further co-ordinate the var-
ious divisions of our campus into a
unidfed body is highly to be commend-
ed. Through the proposed personage
of the Dean of Men I see a possibility
of approaching more nearly to a uni-
versity of "Michigan men" and depart-
ing still farther from merely a group
of hostile colleges, each jealous of the
other's advancement, though it be at
the expense of another branch of
Michigan.
Gives Adverse Attitude
Matthew S. Towar: To pass any in-
telligent judgment upon the advise-
ability of procuring a Dean of Men
is essentially difficult because, al-
though his duties are defined, their
limits are not commensurate. Granti
ing that a man of high academic stand-
ards, coupled with a square sense of
the right, and ,a warm heart can be
found, I believe it would mean a curb
ing of personality and a tendency to
destroy a man's power to choose for
himself. A head master is a very es-
sential part of a preparatory school.
but do the men of Michigan need such
a man?
It would unquestionably mean a
greater gap between student and fac-
ulty as now we have to resort to them;
while the Dean of Men would take
practically all of this away. Are not
the hundreds of members of the fae-
ulty enough of a point of contact for
any friendly student? It not, then
a change in our system and not a Dean
of Men is needed-
QUARTERDEOK INITIATES
FOUR JUNIOR NEOPHYTES
Quarterdeck, marine engineering
society, initiated four members of ts.
Junior cass on Thursday. The ini-
tiates were Carl W. Auer, '21E, J. I.
Larson, '20E, Frederic A. Loundo,
'20E, and John R. Reilly, '20]L Prof..
Anders F. Lindblad, assitant prof-
son of- naval architecture, was atas
an honorary member.
The neophytes spent several ours
sailing ships under the engineering
arch,. These efforts at the art of sea-
manship were followed by a banquet
at the Cutting cafe.

MEMORIAL SERVICE IN PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, HURON AND DIVISION STS., SUN-

DAY, MAY 25 10:30 A. M.

THEME : "A WORK-

ING FAITH FOR THE NEW A GE."$
STUDENTS CORDIALLY iN VITED

LEONARD A. BARRET, Minister

SPECIAL UNION MEETING--
COLONEL GANSSER
"THE SALVA TION ARMY AT THE FRONT"
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
TONIGHT 7:30

Frank . Malleaux, '22, suffered a
broken collar bone as a result of an
injury received while participating in
the Cap night exercises. He is now
at the University hospital, where he
was sent immediately after receiving
the ijury.-
Malleaux is now resting easily and
the results will not be serious, the
doctors say. He will be recovered in
about six weeks.
LATE SP RT NEWS
Until the time of going to press, The
Daily had received no reports from
the Michigan-Ohio State tennis meet.
A late wire from Chicago brought
the following results in tennis and
baseball:
In tennis M. A. C. defeated North-
western 2-1, the singles being tied and
the doubles going to M. A. C.
Chicago won the baseball game with
Illinois by a score of 7-2.

MICHIGANENSIAN STAFF
NOTICE!
Michiganensian staff members
who wish to attend the Al-Pub-
lications bainqvet must sign up
at the offices before Wednesday.
MANAGING EDITOR.

I

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