100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDA

J"

ir. r r ... wri.rr r..v e° .. w .w

Desk Lamps and
Lighting Fixtu re s

Suitable for student use. Our line includes various
standard types of Desk Iamps. Price, $2.75 and up.
Repair work done quickly and at mbderate rates by
experienced electricians.
Washtenaw Eledric Shop

'The Shop of Quality"
300 East Washington St.

Phone 237

-

1
.

Making Preparations for
Decoration Day

Thom do mat foriml that men.

s .
to

any young men ca
everything they ni
(excepting shoes)
store.
HART SCHAFFNE
FINE SPR
r CLOTHI
~I~im;o

an purchase
eed to wear
at this big
ER & MARX

REGENTS APPOINT
KRAEMER AS DEAN
(Continued from Page One)
William W. Bishop at a meeting of the
'American Library association to be
held in June at Asbury Park, N. J.
The Board declined to appoint a man
to the health service office with the
duty of inspecting student boarding
houses.
Two Fellowships Granted
William J. McGill was appointed
holder of the Frederick Steamn's fel-
dowsh p in pharmacy for the next year.
The Dupont fellowship was given to
;George F. Smith for the ensuing year.
The requests for a four weeks'
camp for geological students this sum-
mer was referred to Regent L. L. Hub-
bard.
Regents Leland and Clements were
selected as a committee of two to in-
spect Camp Davis, the engineering
camp of the University, in northern
Michigan.
CAP NIGHT SPEAKERS UNITE
IN INJUNCTION FOR LOYALTY
(Continued from Page One)
their task in upholding the former
standards of their college. He spoke
of Michigan's honorable wartime rec-
ord, and of the necessity that the pres-
ent undergraduates perpetuate this
record. He also said that he did not
consider hazing in keeping with the
dignity of a Cap night program.
Between speeches the Varsity band
played Michigan airs while the crowd
sang.
Following the last speech the fresh-
men began their snake-dance, the first
four men bearing the casket contain-
ing the corpse of '22. As the proces-
sion began its slow and solemn march,
the band struck up the funeral dirge,
and the casket was carried to the
bonfire for cremation. When the
flames licked about the last remains
of the freshman pots the snake-dance
increased in speed.
Free movies in Hill auditorium con-
cluded the event.
UNIVERSITY COLLEQES OFFER
MANY VARIED CURRICULA
(Continued from Page Three)
has a fully equipped hospital, entirely
under faculty control, and gives twen-
ty hours' weekly clinical instruction.
In the College of Dental Surgery
either a three or four years' curricula
may be taken. In the new building
there are large laboratories, library,

I

TODAY
1:00-Meeting of tryouts for manager
of Glee and Mandolin club.
2:30-Varsity band meets in front of
University hall in uniform without
puttees. All members expected to
be present.
i:00-leeting of Upper Room Bible
class, 444 South State street.
7:30--Mae harsh in "Polly of tihe
Circus" at the Methodist church.
TOMORROW
7:30-Colonel Gansser speaks on suib-
ject "Salvation Army at the Front,"
at Union meeting at Presbyterian
church.
I'- OTrICE S
Lee White of the Retroit'News will
address classes in journalism at 10
o'clock Monday morning in room 102
West hall, and at 2 o'clock Wednes-
day in the same place. All persons
interested in journalism are invited
to attend.
DISCUSSION OF PEACE TERMS
CAUSES DEBATE IN SENATE
(Continued from Page One)
him to do otherwise would be "a
gross breach of international propri-
ety."
Resolution Defended
Senator Lodge, prospective chairman
of the foreign relations committee, re-
plied to Mr. Hitchcock, declaring there
was no impropriety in the resolution
unless it were improper to "call atten-
tion to the new method of 'open cov-
enants, openly arrived at.'"
Every shopkeeper in Germany, said
the Massachusetts senator, was read-
ing the treaty as it was made public
in Berlin yet the senate was provided
only with a "worthless" official ab-
stract.
Washington, May 23.-Private own-
ership under federal control was the
consensus of opinion expressed at the
shipping boards conference in discus-
sion of the operation of the new mer-
chant marine, as summed up in an ad-
dress at the closing session today, by
Joh M. Hamilton, of Columbus, Ohio,
representing the American Bankers
association. Opponents of government
ownership were in the minority at the
conference; repressing agricultural
organizations which expressed fear
that sale of the government-built ships
to private companies would result in

WHAT'S GOING ON

The Spirit of Jttichigan

Michliarns
Faviite
ConIee
Son
6V L

Is embodied In the

I1

i

di

Michigan

Song

Book

and interpreted with

Gibson

Instruments

I.i

ING

NG

We have just received a
long-awaited;, shipment

See the display of Gib.
son Instruments in our
window. Then come in

of these famous GibsonI

l'

.I

11

Guitars and Mandolins.

t w

and try them.

tUnvert mIIusic lbdouse

\

ELEGANT SPRING SHIRTS
STYLISH HATS AND CAPS
Including
STRAWS AND PANA3[AS

SMART NECK WEAR
DESIRABLE HOSE

Then we also have a large stock
of Trunks, Suit Cases and Hand

rs. 3. 3.out
VAUMT Sr

LIGHT WEIGHT UNDERWEAR Bags.
Reule, Conlin, iegel Co.
Home of Hart, Schaffner & Narx Clothes

lecture rooms, and clinical rooms, the rates and routes favorable to individ-

Southwest Corner of Main and Washington

Streets

. .._

To University Students,

4

School Children,

and the General Public

Bicycle riding anywhere upon the Campus except
in regular driveways has been forbidden by the Board
bf Regents, in accordance with Public Act. No. 80 of
1905 as amended by Public Act No. 302 of 1907.
Violators are subject to prosecution under the terms of
these Acts. The Buildings and Grounds Department
has been instructed by the Regents to enforce this
legislation. These regulations are entirely separate
and distinct from the City ordinance relative to riding
bicycles upon sidewalks.

l clinical material being in excess of the
present needs.
Higher Degrees Obtainable
The Graduate school offers advanced
and graduate courses in all of the de-
partments of the University, with
special programs leading to the high-
er professional degrees.
During the summer session regular
work of the University may be taken
affording credits toward degrees. More
than 300 courses in arts, science, eng-
neering. medicine, law, pharmacy,
and library methods are at the selec-
tion of the student.
For full information (catalogues,
special annoppcements, illustrated
booklets, etc., or particular matters
of inquiry), the persons interested
should address the deans of the
schools or colleges, or the secretary
of the University.
MICHIGAN TRACK ARTISTS
DOWN NOTRE DAME TEAM
(Continued on Page Six)
ond; Douglass, Notre Dame, third.
Height, 5 feet, 11 inches. Running
broad jump-won by Johnson, Mich-
igan; McGinnis, Notre Dame, second;
Wesbrook, Michigan, third. Distance,
22 feet, 10 3-4 inches. Discus-won
by Gilfillan, Notre Dame; Baker, Mich-
igan, second; Smith, Michigan, third.
Distance, 136 feet, 6 inches. Javelin
-won by King Notre Dame; Smith,
Notre Dame, second; Gilfillan, Notre
Dame, third. Distance 152 feet.

ual exports at the expense of farm
products. Numerous speakers, includ-
ing P. A. S. Franklin, and Frank Mun-
son, o/the American Steamship Own-
ers association, declared this fear to
be. unfounded.
Mr. Hamilton declared the shipping
board offered the nucleus, which would
be what the Federal Reserve board is
to banking. The extent to which the
government would supervise the in-
dustry, however, was the subject, of
great variation in the-discussion.
- -----
ALLIED FORCES OF RUSSIANS
PLAN ATTACK ON PETROGRAD
(Continued from Page One)
,tacked the Bolshevik positions at the
Gatchina railway station 35 miles
south of Petrograd.
Thousands of Bolshevik soldiers in
the Gatchina area and the coast re-
gian west of Petrograd, who surren-
dered with their arms and ammuni-
tion, subsequently joined in the attacks
on their former comrades.
To Defend Petrograd
It is reported in Helingsfors dis-
patches from Petrograd that the Bol-
sheviki are prepared to defend the
city and that all the workmen have
been armed. The defenders are said
to number 300,000.
The Bolsheviki have begun the evac-
uation of Moscow, according to re-
ports from Petrograd to Copenhagen.
Typhus is raging in Moscow and the
situation there is considered desper-
ate.
The railway lines between a number
of places in Central Russia have been
dismantled, the reports say, in order
-to improve main line service out of
Moscow.

1

ALWAYS ASK FOR

onor..'

.r

ICE

C R E AM

I

E. C. PARDON,
Superintendent Buildings and Grounds.

Delicious and Refreshing

I

FRESH EVERY FRIDAY

iU

I MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES

T I C E'S, 117 South MainmSt.

t

WAM

I

MEET ME AT

THE DELTA

State and RPackard

7Kezxosha- cid"Koc
Union Suits

Special

Saturday and Sunday

JFCif. ueT AE

I Fresh Strawberry Short Cake

ALA
MODE.

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan