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May 24, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-24

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9

THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
SHOWERS

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
IDA Y AND NIGHT WIRE
8ERVICk

VOL. XXIX No. 167.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1919.

PRICE THREE CEN1

O OF REGENTS
ELECTS KRAEMER
PHARMACY DEAN
APPROVAL VOICED OF COMING
JOURNALISM TEACHERS'
CONVENTION
THEODORE HARRISON IS
MADE GLEE CLUB HEAD
No Mention 1bade of Prospective In-
eumbent to Succeed University
Head
Professor Henry Kraemer was ap-
pointed dean of the College of Phar-
macy by the Board of Regents at a
regular session yesterday.
Professor Kraemer, who for the past
number of years has been connected
with the College of Pharmacy, was
given the position which had been
held by Dean A. B. Stevens, the latter
having recently resigned.
t Budget Discussed Wednesday
Despite the fact that a great deal of
other busines was taken up by the
Regents, no mention was made of the
prospective incumbentfo the position
of President of the University, to suc-
ceed President Harry B. Hutchins.
The meeting was adjourned without
this matter/ being discussed by the
body, but it was decided that they
would convene again Wednesday, to
discuss the budget of the Univrsty.
Authorization of the appointment of
Theodore Harrison as director of the
University Glee club was made.
Appbval of the convention of
American Association of Teachers of
Journalism to be held in Ann Arbor
in October, was announced by the Re-
gents, and an appropriation for the
entertainment of the visiting dele-
gates was made.
Gordon, 'SM, Given Position
The case of William A. Gordon, '16M,
former interne of the University hos-
pital, was discussed by the Regents
and the appointment of chief resident
physician of the University hospital
was given him. Gordon left the Uni-
versity at the outbreak of the war
and participated in the medical work
overseas until captured by the Ger-
mans.
He was commissioned a captain dur-
ing his service. For seven months he
remained a prisoner in the hands of
the hun and was released with the
signing of the armistice. Gordon is
expected to come to Ann Arbor soon.
Several Degrees Conferred
The degree of Master of Arts was
conferred upon Marion E. Hall and
Jacob Powels, former students of the
University. Theodore L. Squier and
Margaret A. Miller were awarded de-
.grees of doctor of medicine.
Prof. Jr. Raleigh Nelson was authoriz-
ed to attend a meeting to be held June
27-28 at Baltimore, Md., for the pur-
pose of promoting engineering educa-
tion. He will be the official delegate
from the University.
Leaves of Absence Given
The leaves of absence of Professors
Hugh Brodie, Howard B. Merrick, and
Clifton O. Carey, who are at present
in China working on the construction
of the Great canal, were extended
through the fall of next year. Prof.
John C. Briar, of the chemical engi-
neering department, was also given
leave of absence for the ensuing year.
Authorization was given by the
Board for the presence of Librarian
(Continued on Page Six)

INTERSCHOLASTIC NOTE
A meeting of all coaches of
the interscholastic track teamls
will be held between 8 and 9
o'clock this morning at the Ath-
letic ofeices in the Press build-
ing on Maynard street.

MAJOR H. M. BEEBE
BACK FROM FRONT
Major. Hugh M. Beebe, professor of
surgery in the Homoeopathic Medical
School, has returned to Ann Arbor
after nine months service in France.
Prior to the signing of the armistice,
Major Beebe had charge of surgical
teams on the various fronts. Later he
was transferred to evacuation hospi-
tal number 19, where he was the chief
of surgical service. This hospital,
situated at Alleray, France, had all
the medical and surgical.work of the
army of occupation, except contagious
diseases.
About January 1, Major Beebe was
again transferred to Treves, Ger-
many, advanced general headquarters
of the A. E. F. He was at this post
for about two months.
Major Beebe expects to resume his
professorship next fall.
TRACKMENDOWN
CAHOICTEAM
Johnson Takes 23 Points Sedgwck
Breaks Two Mile Rec-
ord
GILFILLAN RETURNS AND IS
STAR FOR NOTRE DAME MEN
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
South Bend, Ind., May 23-(via the
Associated Press).-Michigan defeated
Notre Dame in a field and track meet
here today 69 1-2 to 61 1-2.
Carl Johnson was the star of the
meet, winning four first places, al-
though Hayes, of Notre Dame, beat
him out in the 100-yard dash, due to
the fact that the track was heavy,
slow, and made of dirt.
Gilfillan Enters
Gilfillan upset all the Wolverine
dope by appearing in three events in
which Michigan was fairly strong for
all three places. He also broke the
field record of 135 feet, 8 inches, in the
discus event, hurling the plate 136
feet, 6 inches.
The Notre Dame field records brok-
en were, the javelin, by King, of Notre
Dame; the running broad jump, by
Johnson; and the two mile by Sedg-
wick. Following are the summaries:
100-yard dash-Won by Hayes, Notre
Dame; Johnson, Michigan, second;
Cook, Michigan, third. Time, :10.
Mile run- won by Sweeney, Notre
Dame; Meehan, Notre Dame, second;
Bouma, Michigan, third. Time, 4:36.
120-yard high hurdles-won by Jbhn-1
son, Michigan; Hoar, Notre Dame, sec-
ond; Ryan, Notre Dame, third. Time,
:16 2-5.
440-yard dash-won by Butler, Mich-
igan; Messner, Michigan, second;
Meredith, Notre Dame, third. Time,
:51 1-5. 220-yard dash-won by Hayes,
Notre Dame; Meese, Michigan, sec-I
ond; Losch, Michigan, third. Time,1
:22 2-5. Two mile run-won by Sedg-
wick, Michigan; O'Hara, Notre Dame,
second; Van Wontergen, Notre Dame,4
third. Time, 9:48. 220-yard highs
hurdles-won by Johnson, Michigan;1
Cook, Michigan, second; Hoar, Notre
Dame, third. Time, :26 2-5.1
Michigan Wins Relay
880-yard run-won by McDonough,J
Notre Dame; Burkholder, Michigan,1
second; Meehan, Notre Dame, third.
Time, 2:01. One mile relay-won byJ
Michigan (Petty, Meese,Messner, andI
Butler). Time, 3:29. Shot-won byi
Baker, Michigan; Gilfillan, Notre
Dame, second; Smith, Michigan, third.I
Distance, 41 feet 10 3-4 inches. Pole
vault-Won by Cross, Michigan; Rada-
maker, Notre pame, second; Powers,

Notre Dame, and Wesbrook, Michigan,
third. Height 11 feet, 6 inches.
Johnson Breaks Record
Running high jump-won by John-1
son, Michigan; Hoar, Notre Dame, sec-j
(Continued from Page One) t
COLLEGE BASEBALLt
Illinois 8, Wisconsin 3.c
Ohio 2, Indiana 0.t
Notre Dame 8, Iowa 0.

1919 Year- Book
Nearly Printed
The 1919 Michiganensian is all
printed with the exception of the in-
dex, and it is expected that the books
will be put on sale within 10 days.
More than six tons of pages were
shippedttothe binders in Detroit on
motor trucks last week. These are
being gathered and folded so that
there will be no further delay in the
delivery of the books. Two presses
are running night and day to get the
work done faster. Shortage in the
paper supply on hand caused the re-
cent delay in delivery.
The Michiganensian will contain
more than 850 pages, and the printers
had to order an extra supply of the
special Michiganensian paper to com-
plete the extra large volume. This
year's book will be more than a third
larger than any Michiganensian pre-
viously published. The kh ki, blue,
and gold cover originally planned will
be used. The extra expense entailed
in producing such a large book has
necessitated an increase in price so
that the cash sales will be $3.50 per
book, the same as last year. Those
who have already subscribed will get
their books for $2.50.
The Board of Regents has purches-
ed 500 books to be distributed to the
principal high schools of the coun-
try. It is expected that the circula-
tion will approximate 2,300.
Each book will weigh more than
eight pounds. There are about $3,000
worth of cuts in the volume.
Where, Oh, Where
Are ,Strawn Hats?
If the weather man were a person
to be relied upon, and days in gen-
eral ran according to schedule, all
male Ann Arbor might have blossom-
ed forth yesterday in the time-tried
"dome-shelter" of the summer, the
blithesome straw, and the best season
of all would have been fittingly usher-
ed into being once again.
But rain rather turned the annual
celebration of Straw Hat day into
something of a fizzle. It was reported
that two of the species were seen in
the vicinity of the Ann Arbor railroad
station. Rumor has it that they were
of the "last year's variety."
One clothing merchant failed to stop
reading his paper when asked if his
firm had disposed of any of its stock
on the official day. On being inter-
rogated a second time, he replied that
he had sold many umbrellas.
Freshmen Chosen
T o Debate flay 31
Final investigation has been made
by the eligibility committee upon the
men selected by Alpha Nu and Adel-
phi for their freshman debating teams,
and the teams have been definitely
chosen. The date of May 31 has been
set for the contest which will takej
place at 8 o'clock in University hall.
The Alpha Nu society has selectedP
the following freshmen for their team:I
William H. Seeley, Claude A. Van1
Patten, Robert B. Ritter, and Alfred,
E. Lindbloom, substitute. Adephij
will be represented by Joseph Morris,
Louis Gottlieb, Meyer Baron, and Mil-
ton Atlas, substitute. Judges for the9
debate have not yet beenselected.
It has not been definitely understood1
that if Alpha Nu wins the cup pre-
sented by Delta Sigma Rho. honorary
debating fraternity, this year, there

will be no freshman contest with
Adelphi next year. The termsgovern-
ing the possession of the cup state,
that the team winning the contest7
three times in succession, or the ma-
jority of times out of seven years, se-1
cures the trophy. For the last two
successive years Alpha Nu has won1
the contest and the'outcome of the1
debate on May 31 will decide whether
the cup goes to Alpha Nu or is still to,
be debated foi.

ELECTION RESULTS
CORRECTIONS MADE
Due to inaccuracy in noting of elec-
tion returns Thursday night caused
by their late tabulation, the new mem-
bers of the Board in Control of stu-
dent publications were announced in-
correctly. The men elected were:
Ralph E. Gault, '21L; David B. Lan-
dis, '20; and Carl H. Velde, '20.
Checking up on the Engineering so-
ciety elections shows the following of-
ficers: president, J. M. Darbarker;
vice-president, A. B. Weston; secre-
tary, Robert Storrer; and treasurer,
M. F. Gardner
TREATYMAES HOT
DEBATE IN SENATE
Party Leaders Are Feeling Way Rather
Than Expressing
Opinion
PRIVATE OWNERSHIP UNDER
FEDERAL CONTROL IS POLICY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 23.-The peace
treaty with its league of nations cov-
enant was debated for three hours in
the senate today and at adjournment,
the resolution which furnished the ve-
hicle for the discussion went over as
unfinished business to come up again
when the senate reconvenes Monday.
The resolution merely calls on the
state department to furnish the sen-
ate with She complete text of the
treaty, but as the debate progressed
discussion shifted to the merits of the
league and treaty themselves. A doz-
en senators, including the leaders on
both sides, were drawn into the dis-
cussion as sharp exchanges prefaced
the bitterness of the fight that is to
come when the treaty actually comes
up for ratification.
No Vote Taken
Opponents of the treaty in its pres-
ent form lined up generally for the
resolution. There was no attempt to
reach a vote and some senators pre-
dicted it would be several days before
the preliminary skirmish of the treaty
fight would come to a decision. The
leaders both for and against, appar-
ently are feeling their way carefully.
Senator Johnson of California, Re-
publican, author of the resolution,
started the debate with a short speech
charging that the treaty supporters
had "something to conceal." This as-
sertion drew an indignant reply from
Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska, rank-
ing democrat of the foreign relations
committee, who declared the President
was following well established prece-
dent in keeping the text in confidence
and that for the senate to request
(Continued on Page Six)
BOLSHEVIKS W I L L
DEFEND PETROGRAD
London, May 23.--On the Murmansk1
front in north Russia, Russian allied
forces have captured Medvyejyagora
at the northwestern end of Lake One-
ga, after a series of actions in which
the Bolshevik rear guard suffered se-
verely, a statement issued by the Brit-
ish war office tonight says.
The rapid retreat of the Bolshevik
prevented them from seriously damag-
ing the port works. The allies have
occupied the heights surrounding the
town.
Anti-Bolshevik's Gain
The operations of the anti-Bolshevik
forces against Petrograd are having
great hand rapid success, according to

various reports received here. The
correspondent of the Daily Mail at
Helsingfors says that the Bolshevik
resistance seems to be broken, andi
that they have lost several thousand1
prisoners ant 30 guns. A great num-
ber of machine guns and five armoured-
trains also were captured.
A north Russian corps co-operating
with the Esthonians successfully tat-t
(Continued on Page Six)

CAP NIGHT SPEAKERS URGE CLASSES
jTO UPHOLD CONSISTENTLY MICHIGAN
HONOR, CUSTOMS, AND TRADITIONS

URGES DEPORTATIONS
Washington, May 23--Deporta-
tion from the United States of
"Bolshevik agitators" who caus-
ed disturbances in many cities
on May day was urged in the
house today by Representative.
Johnson, of Washington, chair-
man of the immigration commit-
tee. He also advocated passage
of legislation which would pre-
vent aliens from coming into
the country "until the United
States has been cleansed of its
impurities."
CO. EHNEROES RECEIVE
HEARTY WELCOME HOME
WHISTLES AND BELLS HERALD
ARRIVAL OF RED ARROW
MEN
Marching through Ann Arbor streets
to the martial music of a local band,
escorted by a committee of citizens
and a national guard company, the re-
turned Red Arrow heroes, men of old
Company E, were given a hearty wel-
come home by the cheering throngs
along both sides of the streets on the
line of march.
Parade Follows Arrival
Upon the arrival of their special
car at 6:15 o'clock the men were met
by the reception committee headed by
Mayor Wurster. A bouquet of red
carnations was pinned to each man's
coat. They immediately fell into pa-
rade formation and marched to the
armory, where their relatives waited
to greet them.
Extending the city's welcome to the
returned heroes, Mayor Wurster, in a
short speech at the armory, told the
men how much those who stayed at
home appreciated what they had done
for their country and the allies.
The blowing of whistles and ringing
of bells heralded the arrival of the men
at Jackson. Immediately crowds began
to gather along the street. After an
hour and a half their waiting was re-
warded by the sight of .the sturdy,
bronzed warriors swinging along
smiling and overjoyed to be home at
last.
Wounded Ride in Machines
The parade was headed by Otto's
band followed by the common council
reception committee. After these came
the local state guard troops, ma-
chines carrying men wounded in serv-
ice, other Ann Arbor over-seas men in
uniform, and finally the veterans
themselves of Company E.
American flags of all sizes decorat-
ed the business places and the resi-
dences on the streets along the line of
march. Automobiles which brought up
the rear of the parade, and those
parked along the streets were decor-
ated with flags and large red arrows
bearing the word "Welcome."
PROMOTION COMES TO WARREN
VAUGHAN, SON OF MEDIC DEAN
According to a cablegram recently
received, Major Warren Vaughan,
son of Dean Vaughan of the Medical
school, has been promoted to the rank
of lieutenant-colonel. He is now sta-
tioned at Is-Surtille, France, and is the
third member of the Vaughan family
to be made a lieutenant-colonel since
the war began.
Dean Vaughan has another son in

France, Major Clarence Vaughan, and
three who have recently been discharg-
ed from the service.

BAND, SONGS, AND CLASS YELLS
CHARACTERIZE IMPRESSIVE
CEREMONY
AGAIN FRESHMEN CAST
ASIDE SERVILE "POTS"
'22 Holds Snake-Dance, Bearing Class
Corpse to Last Resting Place
on Pyre
"Uphold Michigan honor and Mich-
igan traditions." Such was in sub-
stance the charge of all three speak-
ers at last night's Cap night exercises,
held in the University's natural amphi-
theater, Sleepy Hollow.
Band Leads Class Parade
Shortly after 7:30 o'clock the vari-
ous classes had congregated at their
meeting places on the campus, and the
march to the scene of the ceremonies
was begun. With the band in the lead,
the march was started, the classes fol-
lowing according to senority, with the
freshmen bringing up the rear.
When the entrance to the Hollow
was reached, a veritable cloud of
"pots" and toques filled the air as
they were thrown into the rceiving
barrels.
By the time the last freshman had
been thoroughly paddled, the crowd
had arranged itself in a large semi-
circle before the speakers' stand. Be-
fore them roared a giant bonfire. Aft-
er rousing Michigan cheers and class
yells had swelled across the amphi-
theater, Ralph E. Gault, '21L, ascend-
ed the speakers' stand. Before intro-
ducing Thomas F. McAllister, '21L, the
first speaker on the program, Gault
welcomed the visiting high school se-
niors and track men.
McAllister, '21L, Speaks
Likening one's college career to a
giant baseball game, McAllister point-
ed out that there are three great fac-
tors in success in college-hard .work
on the part of the student;help and a
certain amount of leniency, character-
ized as intentional blindness and in-
tentional fumbles on the part of the
professors; and the final great sacri-
fice on the part of father, who has
been batting all through the game.
The speech was short, pithy, and to
the point.
Prof. John 4R. Brumm was next in-
troduced as the representative of the
faculty. In a typical speech, mingling
ken wit and serious purpose, Profes-
sor Brumm summed up the true Mich-
igan spirit. This spirit he divided in-
to three main qualities, sportsman-
ship, democracy, and loyalty. These he
explained as they pertain especially
to Michigan; and in welcoming the
class of 1922 to the fellowship of the
University, he charged them to put
these qualities into practice during
their entire stay at Michigan.
James K. Watkins, '11L, was the
third and last speaker, representing
the alumni. Remarking that all of im-
portance had already been said, he
confined himself to welcoming for
the alumni the class of '22, and to
putting before them in a few words
(Continued on Page Six)
SENIOR WOMEN'S VESPERS
INDEFINITELY POSTPONED
Senior Vespers for women which
were to have been held Sunday after-
noon in Martha Cook bullidng have
been indefinitely postponed.
TRIAL DASH HEATS AT 10
Elimination heats in the 100-

i
i
i

and 220-yard dashs will he run
at 10 o'clock this morning. The ,
interscholastic meet will start
at 1:30 o'clock in the afternoon.

L I

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Auditorium

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