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May 23, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-23

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.I. ... - ......... ll.i

THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
SHOWERS

L

It i!3afl&titj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 166.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1919.

PRICE THREE 4

PEACE TERMS iRE
BASIS Of PROTEST
FROM SOCIALISTS
PEACE BY UNDERSTANDING THE
"ONLY HOPE FOR
PEACE
GERMAN REPLY TO
TERMS IN 5 PARTS

Are Deelared Unacceptable on
and Violation of
Program

Face

Berin, May 22. - The majority so-
cialists held a demonstration of pro-
test against the peace terms in the
Wilhemsplatz today. The crowd, in
contrast with earlier meetings, re-
ceived the speeches of the leaders in
frigid silence.
Philipp Scheidmann, the chancellor,
said he hoped in the interest of hu-
manity, to attain a peace by under-
standing on the basis of the German
counter proposals.
Germans Favor Coneiliation
While the German delegates at Ver-
sailles were working for this under-
stan~ing, he added, it was the task of
the government to raise it yoice on
behalf of conciliation, not the aliena-
tion of peoples. A peace by concilia-
tion only, was possible if Germany is
inclugded as an equal in the league of
nations. The league, he declared was
a necessity, but the government was
against the spirit of its present form
which made the Germans the slaves of
other nations. He concluded by call-
ing for cheers for the league.
Present Treaty Impossible
Herr Mueller, for the Independent
Socialists, said the socialists of all
countries must regard peace as im-
possible under the present treaty.
Frau Juchacz, said that If the al-
lied peace terms were carried out
they would perpetuate a war of hun-
ger.
The Independent Socialists held a
demonstration in the Lustgarten.
Serlin, MVay 22.-The German reply
to the allied peace terms will be in
five sections; dealing with political
and territorial issues, the league of
nationi, and financial and economic
questions.
The note already transmitted to the
(Continued on Page Six)
DAILY IAM19 O ARTISTS
PREPARE FOR CONTEST
Setting out to prove the superiority
of the organized press over the in-
sufficient mongrolisms of the slap-it-
on cartoon, the blank verse and ribald
humor, the athletic association of The
Michigan Daily has already begun to
muster its exponents of the national
pastime, for the annual tilt on Me-
morial day with followers of the grim-
visaged idol, the Gargoyle.
It Is rumored that certain of The
Daily team formerly wore white stock-
ings, but that is as much as could e i
learned for publication. On good au-
thority, however, it is said that a num-
ber of former big leaguers will be
found on The Daily line-up.
With its characteristic humor, the
Gargoyle claims that its chances for
victory seem unusually bright. They
probably expect to mHake the Daily
scribes ite the dust after wounding
them with thrusts of barbed wit and
cutting sarcasm. Although the umpire
has not u yet been selected to offici-
ate, he wili be instructed to come
well arrmed and prepar d for hostili-
ties. Despite t#e fact that no medie-
val armor suits are available at pres-
ent in Ann Arbor, it is hoped that boil-
er plate Will su'tic. One of the um-
pire's duties will be to see that the
sides are linited to nine men. ID
previogs years the Gargoyle showed
a propounced tentteg to substitute
without removing players. This fre-
quently left seven or eight men in the
intlet +
It hog not been decided as yet which
to 4hovse of the many cups that have
ben put up for the conflict, but one
will be picke4 some time before the
struggle pomes q

ALLIES DRIVE OUT
BOLSHEVIK FORCES
(By Associated Press)
London, May 22.-The allied troops
on the north Russian front have car-
ried on a successful turning move-
ent against the main Bolshevik po-
sition, forcing the enemy to retire
southward, according to a north Rus-
sian official communication received
here this evening. Several towns were
captured, many prisoners taken, and
the enemy suffered heavy casualties.
The communication states that the
urning novement was carried out May
20, north of Medvyejyagora, six miles
outh of Lumbushki on the railway and
that the enemy was expelled from his
position and is now in full retreat. The
towns of Lumbushki, Ostreche and Ko-
lobari were taken.
London, May 22.-A Bolshevik wire-
less message from Petrograd today
denied reports that Riga and Dvinsk
had been captured by other Bolshevik
forces. The Lettish information bu-
reau in Copenhagen announced today
that Riga had been occupied by Let-
tish troops. Nothing was aid of
Dvinsk, which is on the Lettish front.
ENLARGE ON, PLAN
FORDEAN OF MEN
Prof. Iwuis A. Strauss Furthers Talk
in Report to University Senate
Commtee
'RECOMMENDS SELECTION OF
MAN WHO WILL BE RESPECTED
The Senate committee on stude
affairs, in regard to its proposed Unf-
versity policy for the creation of an
oce It Dean of Men which is now be-
fore the University Senate, has enlarg-
ed upon the original discussion of the
proposition that was offered to the
Senate council. In addition to what
was published in a recent issue of The
Daily, Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chair-
man of the committee and speaking
for it, furthers the discussion of the
question.
Excerpts Given
Several excerpts taken from this
development of the matter are here-
with given:
"There is but one important point
that the committee would wish to im-
press upon the University Senate with
regard to its idea of the type of man
who should be chosen to fill this po-
sition if created. Primarily this ofil-
cer's duties would begin with the
functions now inadequately fulfilled by
the chairman of this committee. How
far his efforts would extend in the di-
rection of personal contact with the
individual students, his private life,
his part in college activities, his schol-
arship itself, no one can, at present.
say. But I venture to predict that,
however we may seek to emphasize the
social bearing of his work, a very few
years will serve to convince the
academic deans that this officer is
their most valuable ally in the creation
of better ideals of schlorship.
Two Kinds of Interest
"For do you not see that regulation
of student organization and incitement
to better scholarship are one and the
same thing? Student interests, aside
from their studies, are theoretically of
only two kinds: those that are detri-
mental to scholarship and those that
are beneficently supplementary to it.
I categorically deny the existence of
the first kind.
"Even dancing of the right sort and
in the right amount is good, not bad.
No one can say there are too many
dance, but it is easy to prove that
this boy and that girl attend far too
many. Here is the evil, and it is en-
tirely personal, not corporate in na-
ture. It is so with all other student
activities: no member of the faculty'
denies the value of the Oratorical as-
sociation, the Classical or Biological'

club, the various dramatic and musi-
cal societies; yet each and all of
these interests may work harm to the
individual student who devotes him-+
self to them to the' neglect of his
studies.
Argument Sound
"The argument that the editor of
the Michiganensian or .he winner of
the oratorical contest is getting more
solid good out of his experience than
(Continued on Page Six)

I WHERE CLASSES MEET
I Band-In front of Hill audi-
torium.
Seniors-Between Natural Sci-
ence and Chemistry buildings.
Juniors-Between Natural Sci-
ence and Chemistry buildings.
Sophomores - On diagonal
walk near Law building.
Freshmen-At flag pole.
f I
Wil Bequeaths
$10, 000 To U. A1

SONGS PRECEDE
BY PROFESSOR

Dirge Will b
Hold Snak
Ing
Meeting pr
tonight at th
the campus, t
fall in line in
to begin the n
where the an
will be held.
From the c

Miss Frances A. Lawton, in her will will move do
recently probated, left a bequest of State street, c
$10,000 to the University. Six thou- and up Ann s
sand dollars of this is to be used to At the entran
establish a fellowship in astronomy boxes into wh
and the rest is to be used as a fund are to be th
of publicity for the work done at the them. Descen
U. of M. observatory or in other de- are to arrang
partments of University 'work. speakers' sta
Miss Lawton was the daughter of men in front.
the late Prof. Uriah W. Lawton, for- tors customa
mer superintendent of schools in hind the stud
Jackson. Her brother was the noted Prog
astronomer, George K. Lawton, who Cap nightl
died in Washington, D. C., in 1901. traditional an
has followed t
ors. A select
will start th
Ralph Gault,
of ceremonies
of the speak
'21L, represen
Walter R. S
the crowd in s
We sing" and
Knode and Froemke Star in Field for Prof. John L.
olverine; Donnelly troduced to sp
Wo nellsinging of "I
Good Michigan" an
follow Profes
SCHEIDLER'S PITCHING BRIGHT Watki
FEATURE OF FARMER CONTEST The last of
- James K. Wa
East Lansing, May 22.-Michigan sents the alu
took the second baseball game of the Watkins was
season from the Michigan Agges, ing played Va
score 5 and 2. There were no sensa- Ident of the i
tional plays in the game, but both trof theDU
teams fought all the way for the vic- tr of The Dai
tory, and the final result came to the Where" will
winners in the last three innings. Whee"ly 1
Michigan made eight hits during the will play the
game and the Farmers, five. Nearly corpse of 19
all of the runs were earned and there freshmen will
were very few misplays. Froemke and about the bon
Knode were the fielding stars of the F
game, both making one handed catches Following t
that cut off runs. The Aggies played classes will
a consistent game in the field, back- where the mo
ing up the pitcher in excellent man- giving an p
ner. feature pictur
Schetdler and Donnelly were the wooing,"Star
opposing boxmen, and both pitched story involved
steady games. gum-chewing,
steadygames._ographer of f
her class, she
CHAIRMAN SELECTS MEMBERS beauty when
FOR CAMPAIGN COX 1ITTMF feet, for whil
prietor of th
Jane Duemling, '19, chairman of the cart may bei
committee for the Alumnae House feature, he d
campaign, has named the following beautiful love.
senior women as members: Helen Jane Wa
Davis, Phyllis Mann, Emily Loman, Jane, howe
Frances McDonald, Jean McLellan, "marry money
Blanche Howell, Eva Foss, Blanche Lyman, some
Goodell, Helen Osband, Lucille Duff, heir of her ag
Edith Duemling, Katherine Kilpatrick, Monty leads t
Marcia Pinkerton, Lois Bennallack, elder Lyman,
Ethel Glauz, Melba Bastedo, Grace his will, bequ
Emory, Hazel Beckwith, Ella Rasmus- Jane, and co
sen, and Gertrude Gunn, then finds his
A meeting was held last night and even greater t
plans for the campaign were dis- poses to her.I
cussed. izes that afte
the real man,
STATE HOHOEOPATHIC MEDIC to tear up th
SOCIETY MEETS IN JACKSON him. Other
connection _wi
in."
At the meeting of the State Homoe-
opathic Medical society, held May 21
and 22, In Jackson, Dean W. B. Hins- ELECTION 0
dale, of the Homoeopathic medical HELEN NE
s-chool was elected president. Dr. G. I.
Naylor, also of the faculty, is the new Eleetion of
ecretary-treasurer. ffor the Helen
It is expected that the annual meet- sulted in the
ing will be held in Ann Arbor next '20, president;
year. retary.

VARSITY BAND WILL HEAD MARCH
OF CLSSES TO SLEEPY HILLOW
FROM CAMPUS AT 7;3OTONIGHT

RALPH GAULT, MASTER OF CERE-
MONIES TO INTRODUCE
SPEAKERS

TALK
BRUMM

no Played as Freshmen
e-Danee Around Burn.
Corpse of 1922
omptly at 7:30 o'clock
eir appointed places on
he different classes will
order, behind the band
march to Sleepy Hollow
nual Cap night program
ampus the procession
wn North University to
out State to Ann street,
treet to the observatory.
ce to the Hollow will be
ich all "pots" and toques
rown as the men pass
iding the hill the classes;
e themselves before the
nd in order, the fresh-
Townspeople and vsi-
rily seat themselves be-
ents.
ams Traditional
programs are somewhat
d the committee this year
the -lead of its predecess-
ion by theVarsity band
e evening, after which
'21L, acting as master
, will introduce the first
ers, Thomas McAllister,
iting the students.
ta °k, '19, will then lead
singing "'Tis of Michigan
"Varsity,"after which
R. Brumm will be in-
eak for the faculty. The
Want to Go Gack to
d "College Days" will
sor Brumm's talk.
Ins Speaks Last
P the speakers is to be
tkins, '11L, who repre-
nni on the program. Mr.
prominent on the cam-
is college career, hav-
rsity football, been pres-
rnion and managing edi-
ly.
he addresses, "Where 0'
be sung, and the band
funeral dirge as the
22 is burned, and the
hold their snake-dance
i-fire.
Free Movi
he regular program all
go to Hill auditorium
ving pictur theaters are
en performance. The
e will be "Jamb Goes A-
ring Vivian Martin. The
concerns Jane Neill, a
air-castle building sten-
air ability. Typical of
refuses to recognize true
it lies directly at her
e Micky Donovan, pro-'
a "White House" lunch'
no Adonis in form and
oes offer Jane a truly
ts to Marry Money
ver, is determined to
" and she meets Monty
what worthless son and
ed millionaire employer.
0o gay a life to suit the
who suddenly changes
eathes all his fortune to
aveniently dies. Monty
interest in Jane to be
than formerly, and pro-
It is then that Jane real-
r all Micky Donovan is
and she finally decides
to will and go back to
lims will be shown in
th "Jane Goes A-woo-
F OFFICERS HELD
KWBER3Y RESIMENCE
offeers held ysterday
Newberry residence re-
following: Edna Apel,
Edna A. Groff, '3 see-

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Paris, May 22.-Count Von Brock-
dorff Rantzau accompanied by several
of the German peace delegates has
again gone to Spa. He will consult
with representatives of the German
government there.
Cologne, May 22.-It is said that' the
allied troops everywhere are ready for
in immediate advance into Germany
should it become necessary.
New York, May 22.-Twenty-seven
thousand troops of the American Ex-
peditionary force stepped ashore here
today from the eight transports which
had brought them from France. This
Is the greatest number of dough boys
to debark at this port on any one
day. Virtually all states were repre-
sented among the personnel of these
arrivals.
COMEDY CLUMB PLAY
PROVES SUCCESS
Unique Plot of "Green Stockings"
Holds Interest of Appreciative
Audience
FICTITIOUS CHARACTER ADDS
SPICE TO FARCIAL SITUATION
(By Milton Marx)
If you should happen to be the eldest
daughter in a family of marriageable
girls, and your younger sisters seem-
ed, to be more attractive than you, and
received all the attentions of the eligi-
ble young men in the community, and
you were very lonesome for company,
and didn't know what to do to become
popular, you might invent a fictitious
lover, place him in some far off coun-
'try, and engage yourself to him.
That this will prove-successful be-
yond all expectation was shown last
night at the Whitney teather, when the
Comedy club presented A. E. W. Ma-
son's comedy, "Green Stockings," to a
large and appreciative audience.
Plot Is Farcial
Celia Faraday is in the predicament
stated above, and to make the mem-
bers of her family take notice of her,
she engages herself to "Colonel Smith,"
who has just left for parts almost
unknown. For eight months she has
a most delightful time, and then she
decides to kill him, which she does to
the horror and pity of the family, and
the intense amusement of herself and
an aunt who is in the conspiracy.
But the fictitious lover appears in
the flesh, and many are the compli-
cations that result. But all ends hap-
pily, as it should in a comedy, and
Celia decides that after all a man who
has been waiting for 20 years for the
right girl to come along ought not
wait any longer.
Helen Cady, '20, Stars
Helen Cady, '20, as Celia Faraday,
easily deserves first mention. First as
the plain, unattractive "spinster" who
must wear the green stockings for the
third time, then as the attractive fi-
ancee of the absent "Wobbles," and
lastly as the embarrassed woman,
face to face with the result of her
foolish joke, she is delightful through-
out. She appears perfectly at home
on the stage, and her naturalness is
one of the treats of the evening.
Robert Tarver, who is running for.
Parliament, and must have everybody's
help in order to win his seat, is the
comic character of the piece, and Gil-
bert Byrne, '19, makes the most of the
part.
Three Sisters Allring
The three sisters who cause all the
trouble by being more attractive than
Celia (at first) are most alluringly
portrayed by Mabel Bannister, '19,
Marion Bath, '21, and Carrie Smith,
'21. Elizabeth Oakes, '20, is Aunt Ida,
who has the audience in an uproar
when she takes a bit too much brandy.
Richard Forsyth, '20, is the hero, the
fictitious "Wobbles" who appears so
unexpectedly on the scene. He is as

stately and gentlemanly as we would
expect of such an army officer. His
scenes with the "trinkets" of the late
departed colonel are excellent.
Every Role Well Taken
The minor characters must not be
neglected, but to name all worthy of
mention would be just to repeat the
cast. Every role was well taken, and
the campus has- shown once more that
it can stage a regular play in a reg-
(Continued on Page Six)

G. P. SCHAFER ELECTED
RECORDING SECRETARY
Careful Planning of Committee Gives
Every One Opportunity
to Vote
With a total of almost 2,000 votes
cast, yesterday's election is considered
to be the best and most complete that
has been held on the campus in many
years. Careful planning of the com-
mittee,, headed by S. S. Slavens, '21L,
resulted in the booths bing placed
where every student had an opportu-
nity to vote. Promptly at 5 o'clock
the polls were closed and the ballot
boxes taken to the Press building,
where Student councilmen counted
the votes.
Hogan Union President
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, won in the close
race for the presidency of the Union
and G. P. Schafer, '20A, was elected
recording secretary. Rollin Winslow,
'20L, came out ahead for law vice-
president; Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E,
engineering; Harold Makinson, '21M,
medic; William W. Hinshaw, '20, lit-
erary, and C. J. Clemo, '20D, combined
departments. Prof. Henry C. Adams,
lit; Dean Henry M. Bates, law; and
Prof. John C. Parker, engineering,
were elected faculty members for the
board of directors of the Union.
Student Counelmen Chosen
The following men were elected Stu-
dent councilmen from the various
classes David Nash, junior lits; Law-
rence Butler, sophomore lits; E. J.
Blackert, junior laws; Jos. A. Kerwin,
junior medics; F. 3. Helbig, pharmics;
G. H. Benjamin, junior architects.
Voting for the officers of the Ora-
torical association resulted as fol-
lows: president, Carl G. Brandt; vice-
president, Florabel Ellis; secretary,
Olive Smith; treasurer, James K. Pol-
lock; delegates at large, Jane Bart-
land, Earl Boxell, Earl Dunn, Leland
Gault, Kelsey Guilfoil, Earl Miles,
George True, and D. A. Watts.
Engineering Society Officers
C. R. Ford was elected president of
the Engineering society; B. Douglas,
vice-president; Arthur Heimerdinger,
secretary; Stanley Lowe, treasurer.
Engineering honor committee will
(Continued on Page Six)
TALKS TO ENINEE8111RS
President Harry B. Hutchins ad-
dressed the meeting of the senior en-
gineers this morning speaking of the
engineer and his profession. His talk
was to the effect that the engineer
must have a comprehensive working
knowledge of the English language if
he desires to make a success of his
profession, for he must be a broad-
man.
Both the president and vice-presi-
dent of the class were unable to at-
tend the meeting. An urgent plea was
'made for the payment of all class
dues.
At the sophomore engineering class
meeting Dean Mortimer E. Cooley was
the speaker. In an inspiring talk he
warned the men that the need for
learning to think for one's self, in-
stead of letting others think for one,
was greater today than ever before.
"It is this way," he said, "that the
wave of Bolshevism sweeping over not
only the campus but the entire coun-
try, can be checked."
Plans for Cap night were discussed
and completed at the meeting. A com-
mittee was appointed to request the
faculty to allow the class to hold more
frequent meetings next year. It was
announced that soph engineers would
play the fresh laws for the inter-class
baseball championship in the near fu-
ture.
Dean Cooley also addressed the ju-
nior engineering class. These are the
three last regular class meetings of
the year.

2,000 STUDENTS
CASTf BALLOTS IN
CAMPUS ELECTIDI

I'

'ARL HOGAN CHOSEN UNION I
IDENT IN CLOSE
RACE

i ; r

Hill
Auditorium

BA

ADMISSION 35 CENTS

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