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May 21, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
BABLY FAIR
TODAI

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Sitr itau44atj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W11
SERNICE

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 164. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 1919. PRICE THREE C

ARLY RTUHN OF
PU UTILiTIES
ASKED By WILSON
REVISION OF WAR TAX LAWS
PROPOSED IN CABLED
MESSAGE
RECOMMENDS REPEAL
OF BEER AND WINE ACT
Keastres for Merchant Marine System
and Woman Suffrage Before
Senate
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 20-President Wil-
son's cabled message outlining legis-
lation for the extra session of the new
Congress was red separately in the
Senate and House today by clerks,
and arrangements were made by con-
gressional leaders for immediate con-
sideration of the vast legislative pro-
gram with the equal suffrage regula-
tion to come up tomorrow in the
House.
keeommends Return of Utilities
Major recommendations of the Pres-
ident were for early return to private
ownership of railroads, telegraph and
telephone systems, for repeal of war
time prohibition in so far as it ap-
plies to beer and wines, for women
suffrage, retaliatory tariffs, protection
of the dyestuff industry, and labor and
employment measures. The President
announced his intention to turn back
the railroads at the end of the calen-
dar year.
Repeal of Dry Law Opposed
Republican leaders met the Presi-
dent's proposals for early return of
piblic utilities by statements that such
legislation already was planned. As
to the prohibition recommendation
hepublican 'and Democratic
dr" leaders joined in vigiorous state-
ments dissenting from the President's:
suggestions and predicting that no
beer and wine repeal would be passed.'
inionĀ° in both Senate and House as
acrtained by .leaders was general
that the ban on beer and wine would
not be lifted;
Y Presentation of the President's mes-
sage was the principle business of too
day's session. Neither the Senate nor
house were in session much more than
hu hour, the former adjourning until
ne4t Friday and the house until to-
uorrow. Before the President's mes-
sage was read the house arranged to
alke up the woman suffrage resolu-
ton tomorrow. Its adoption before
adjourliment is planned. Senate lead-.
era have promised prompt action in
the upper body probably early next
Congress Flooded with Bills
A good of bills and resolutions were
opened In the Senate today while
,seores more were thrown into the
* house hopper which yesterday receiv-
ed about '1,200. The principal meas-
ures in the Senate asked for copies
of the peace treaty, for definition of
the American policy in Russia, adop-
tion of woman suffrage, establishment
of a federal merchant marine sys-
tem, and repeal of the luxury taxes,
and the daylight saving law. All were

C L I C K! SCRIBES,
TO BE INITIATED
Click! Click!
The metropolitan reporter belabors
his typewriter at full speed in order
to grind out copy for the last edition.
Swish! Swish!
The copy chaser's coat tails flap
noisily as he dashes around the corner
to get the belated advertising copy.
These and other characteristics oc-
cupations of the busy journalist will
be the order of business this after-
non when certain ink - bedaubed
habitues of the press room aredmade
better acquainted with the rules and
regulations of their profession.
Swish! Swish!
Click! Click!
May the initiates commit few typo-
graphical errors as they enter Pi Del-
,ta Epsilon, national honorary journal-
istic fraternity.
ED1IOR TO TALK
4ON~ OURNLISM

Malcolm W. Bingay to Lecture
"The Noblesse Oblige of
Journalism"

01

PROF. FRED NEWTON SCOTT
WILL INTRODUCE SPEAKER
"The Noblesse Oblige, of Journal-
ism" will be the subject of the lec-
ture which Malcolm W. Biugay, edi-
tor of the Detroit News, will deliver
at 4 o'clock this afternoon in room 208
Tappan hall.
The speaker will touch upon the ac-
tivities of college men and women in
professional journalism. On this sub-
ject Mr. Bingay is considered unusu-
ally well fitted to talk, inasmuch as
he isI the employer of a number of
graduates of the University.
Pi Delta Epsilon and Sigma Delta
Chi, the two fraternities under whose
auspices the lecture is to be given,
consider themselves fortunate in be-
lug able to bring Mr. Bingay to Ann
Arbor. As managing editor of the'
Detroit News he holds an important
position in middle western journalism,
and his talk promises to hold much
of interest to all interested in any
phase of journalism.
Prof. Fred Newton Scott of the
rhetorio department will introduce the
speaker. The lecture is open to the
public and it is hoped that a large
audience will hear Mr. Bingay.
Lantern Night
Again Revived
Lantern Night, an old Michigan
tradition among women, is to be re-
vived on Field day, May 26. On that
evening women of the campus and
city will gather on Palmer field, ta4-
ing with them picnic lunches. There
will be bonfires to roast "wienies"
and marshmallows, and coffee will be
served by the Women's league.
Later in the evening there will be
May pole dancing, the Martha Cook
orchestra furnishing music. Class
songs, new and old, are to be sung
by the classes individually and Mich-
igan songs by everyone.
Japanese lanterns will be carried
by the senior women, who will form
the "M" and then march in formation
to meet the junior women, each of
whom will carry a flower-bound hoop.
Seniors will give their lanterns to the
juniors and the juniors will, in turn,
give their hoops to the sophomores.
The cermeony is even more beauti-
ful than would be imagined and the
whole event is one of the most whole-*
some of Michigan traditions. Sic
years ago the Cottillion was insti-
tuted to replace Lantern Night, but
inasmuch as that is now given in the
fall or winter, it has been decided to
revive this old custom.

GREEN STOCKINGS
FIRST REHEARSAL
REVELS TALENV
LINES LETTER PERFECT; BUT
FEW PARTS IN NEED OF
IMPROVEMENT
INITIAL PERFORMANCE
TO BE HELD FRID AY
Even Unpolished Presentation Brings
Out humor of Play; Tickets
Now on Sale
Smootness of action marked the
first dress rehearsal for "Green Stock-
ings," the three act play to be pre
sented at 8:15 o'clock Thursday night
at the Whitney theater by the Com-
edy club.
With the cast letter perfect in its
lines, only a few rough spots remain
to be removed in the action of the
play, and these will be subjected to
the smoothing process at the final re-
hearsal today under the direction of
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister of the orator-
ical department.
A "Polite" Comedy
Members of the Girls' Glee club,
which will give a concert in Jackson
Thursday night, attended the perform-
ance last night. If the club be a rep-
resentative public, the play, which has
been characterized by Life as a "pol-
ite" comedy, is destined to be popular
with the audience at the final produc-
tion.
Humorous possibilities in "Green
Stockings" were amply demonstrated
in the unpolished lines of the play,
and the show promises to keep the au-
dience in an uproar of laughter on
Thursday. Gilbert R. Byrne, '19, car-
rying the only distinct comedy role in
the production, has a character por-
trayal particularly appealing to the
(Continued on Page Six)
HIGH SCHOOL STUENTS
TO VISIT UNIVERSITY
ELABORATE PROGRAM PLANNED
FOR WEEK-END; HERE
FRIDAY
Plans have been made by the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. to entertain about
100 high school seniors, who are com-
ing to Ann Arbor this week. Most of
these men are expected to arrive on
Friday afternoon. Arrangements have
been made for them to stay at the
various fraternity houses.
Banquet Friday
Pres. A. C. Crockett of the Y. M. C.
A. will act as toastmaster at the ban-
quet to be given Friday at 8:30
o'clock, at the Methodist church. Dean
John R. Effinger, and Ralph Gault,
'21L, will be the speakers of the even-
ing. Music is to be furnished by A. J.
Gornetsky,. '19L, and several other
students. Leslie P. Guest, '20, will
perform sleight of hand tricks.
Guests of Fraternities
After the banquet, the visitors will
attend Cap night exercises, and will
then meet representatives of the fra-
ternities, who will take them to the
fraternity houses. Saturday morning,
there is to be a meeting at which
Prof. John R. Brumm, and Secretary
Shirley Smith will explain entrance
requirements, and customs of the Uni-
versity. Erwin Goodwillie, '20E, will
preside. Stephen Atwood, '8E, and
Earl Miles, '21, will talk on student

activities and expenses. Dr. T. 'M. Ides
will also give a short talk, after which
the guests will be divided into groups,
with a student in charge of each
group, and shown the points of inter-
est on the campus.
The Michigan-Iowa baseball game,
and the interscholastic track meet, on
Saturday afternoon, will be last on the,
program of entertainment for the vis-
itors.

Whistlers, Magicians,
Musicians to Unite
Successful

ANNUAL EVENT OF VARSITY
BAND TO BE HELD MAY 97
Another big act has been added to
the six already announced for the
Band Bounce May 27. The Varsity band
will introduce the program which will
consist of the following:
"Michigan in 1931," a skit written
by H. P. Bennett, '21L. A company of
eight people will render this laughable
farce.
"Six Clown Boys," a musical skit in
which the best talent on the campus
has been enlisted.
Impersonations on Program
Archie MacDonald of Spotlight
Vaudeville fame will entertain with a
new selection of his inimitable im-
personations. It will be remembered
that his "take-offs" on a number of
campus celebrities, professors and
otherwise, were one of the features
that made the Spotlight such a suc-
cess.
A whistler entirely new to the ears
of the campus will come next and the
Bounce promoters promise something
from him that "will make everyone sit
up and take notice."
The banjo ukelele will be strummed
by Vernon Foote, '22E, while he re-
calls memories with heart rending dit-
ties.
Gest to Perform Again
A new and better than ever series
of tricks is on schedule from Leslie
P., Gest, '20, magician. His mass of
paraphernalia is now being gathered:
together so that he may startle his
quick-disappearing rabbits and those
in the front row.
A black-face quartette as yet anony-
mous but well-known in campus jazz
circles will close the program with the
latest melodies in every conceivable
key except the wrong one.
Tickets for the affair are now on
sale on the campus and at the book
stores,
HUNS MUST STAND
WORLD WAR DEBT
Paris, May 20.-The answer of the
council of four to the German note re-
garding reparations which will be
handed to the Germans tonight points
out in reply to the German refusal to
accept responsibility for the war that
it is impossible to disassociate re-
sponsibility from reparation.
The reply recalls that the Germans
raised no objection to Secretary Lan-
sing's note of last Nov. 5, in which he
spoke of German aggression.
The council of four also refused
to admit that the German people may
disclaim responsibility of the actions
of the ofrmer German government.
Former Daily Man Back from War
Conrad N. Church, '17, formerly news
,editor of The Michigan Daily, arriv-
ed in Ann Arbor yesterday having re-
ceived his discharge from the ordi-
,ance corps. Church saw six months'
service overseas, being taken prisoner
,shortly before the armistice was
signed.

To give everyone on the campus an
opportunity to vote in the All-Campus
election Thursday, May 22, from 8
until 5 o'clock, the Student council
committee has made arrangements to
have ballott boxes placed in each de-
partment.
Booths will be located in the Law
building, Engineering building, two
boxes in University hall, one in the
Dental building, one in the Medical
building, and bne in the Chemistry
building. Pharmacists and, homoeo-m
SEVEN ACTS READY
FOR BAND BOUNCE:

ALL ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY STUDENT
COUNCIL FOR ALL - CAMPUS ELECTION

Comedians and
in Assuring
Bill

pathic students will vote at the latter.
All men students are eligible to
vote on the ballots bf their respective
departments. All women are to vote
only on candidates for the Oratorical
association and the Student council
candidates from their own class.
Before receiving a ballot each voter
will be required to sign his name on
a tablet provided for that purpose.
Student councilmen will be in charge
of the booths and at 5 o'clock the
boxes will be taken to the Union
where members of the council not
running for office will count the votes.
Voters are cautioned that they may
vote only for the number of candidates
stipulated upon the ballots. In many
instances there are six or seven can-
didates listed for the same office of
whom four are to be checked. Any
student may vote for less than the
number to be elected but his vote
will be void if more names are check-
ed than specified.
FREE MOVIE TO BE
GIVEN CAP NIGHT
Purpose Is to Keep Students from
Forcing Admittance to City's
Theaters
"
HILL AUDITORIUM OBTAINED;
BEST FEATURES PROMISED
A complete moving picture show in
Hill auditorium will be given by the
managers of the Ann Arbor theaters
for the benefit of the Cap night par-
ticipants and spectators.
The Student councl accepted this
plan at its meeting Tuesday night be-
lieving that it will be better than
having the different classes demand
admittance at various theaters. In
past years the classes separated im-
mediately after the last of the speech-
es to parade to the theaters. Under
this new arrangement the band will
lead the assemblage to the auditorium,
where the show will begin as soon as
the classes are seated.
Orders for the films have already
been sent in. An up-to-date feature
and a snappy comedy are promised.
Wood for the fire is being secured
with difficulty since most of the local
merchants either sell their boxes or
have donated them to various organi-
zations that use them for sending
supplies and comforts to soldiers and
sufferers.
Girls' Glee Club
Ready For Trip
Miss Nora Crane Hunt of the vocal
faculty of the School of Music will
charepon and direct the University
Girls' Glee club on its trip to Jackson
Thursday night when they will sing
at the Wes$ Side intermeriate school
under the auspices of the Jackson
Teachers' club. Martha Cook's or-
chestra of six pieces will accompany
the club in several numbers and Emily
Powell, '19, will, be the piano accom-
panist.
.The personnel of the Glee club is as
follows: Agnes Abele, '20; Enda
Apel, '20; May Blakesley, '20; Winona
Beckley, '19; Dorothea Bristol, '20;
Eiladean Brown; Florence Crozier,
'20; Roberta Dean, '20; Hilda de Barr,
'19; Elsie Erley, '20; Carrie Fairchild,
'21; Margaret Harison, '20; Esther
Hollands, '21; Gretchen Jones, '20;
Louise Kreger, '19; Mildred Kirkpat-

rick, '19; Beatrice McKnight, '19; Em-
ily Loman, '19; Jean McClellan, '19;
Bernice Nickels; Anna Noble, '20;
Frances Glenn, '19; Dora Osterberg,
'20; Mary Lehrstorfer, '21; Ora von
Ewegen, '21; Irma Robinson, '19;
Gladys Schultz; '19; Marjorie Van Nor-
man, '20; Endema Williams, '20; Rose
Sturmer, '20; Esther Payne, '20.

NC" E TO HOP;
HAWKER BELIEVED
LOST IN ATLNTICr
INTREPID BRITISH AVIATOR IS
STILL NHEARD*
FROM
AMERICAN PERSONNEL
IN EXCELLENT SHAPE
Raynham in Race Again for Ocean
Cruise After "Take-Off"
Accident
(By Associated Press)
London, May 20 (10:10 p. i.)-
Tuesday passed without word of ay
kind concerning Harry Hawker and
Lieut. Commander Grieve and their
Sopwith plane in which they left St.
Johns, Sunday afternoon In an at-
tempt to fly across the Atlantic.
Washington, May 20.- The naval
seaplane NC-1 which was forced down
by fog early Saturday during the
transatlantic flight to the Azores has
sunk at sea. The second of the trio
of. planes, the NC-3 which was. lost
for nearly 60 hours off the Azores,.is
being dismantled for shipment back to
the United States.
This information was received to-
night at the navy, department fro
Commander Towers at Ponta dl Geda
in a summary of the situation. The
cablegram said:
N-1 Lost at Sea
"NC-1 sunk at sea, all persons res-
cued. NC-3 at moorings in Ponta del
Gada in very badly damaged condi-
tion. Both lower wings wrecked, wing
pontoon gone, tail badly damaged, hull
severely wrecked and leaking badly.
It is being dis-assembled and will be
shipped to New York.
"NC-4 at mooring In Ponta del Gada
bay in excellent condition aLd will Io-
ceed to Lisbon as soon as weather
permits.
"All personnel in excellent condi-
tion except very minor casualties to
NC-1 crew.
Raynham Again in Race
iSt. Johns, May 20.-Frederick ,P.
Raynham, the British aviator whose
intention to attempt the ocean flight
simultaneously with Harry Hawker,
believed to have been lost at sea, came
to grief when his Martinsyde plane
was wrecked while running to the
"take off," announced here today ttt
he was again in the race for the first
non-stop ocean air cruise.
Recovered sufficiently from injuries
sustained when his machine was
wrecked to move from his bed, Rayn-
ham said that the machine could be
rebuilt with spare parts on hand here,
provided the motor was in working
condition.
STYLUS SETS DEFINITE DATE
FOR SUBMISSION OF STORIES
For the present year at least Stylus
Literary society has decided to limit
the short story contest to women only.
Ten dollars in prizes is offered for the
best stories. On account ofsome ap-
parent misunderstandng about the
;date on which the stories were to be
submitted the date has been changed
to May 28. All manuscripts must be
in by that time.

ENTERTAINERS, NOTICEI
Tryouts for entertainers for
the Varsity Glee and Mandolin
club will be held between 2
and 4 o'clock in room 328 Natur-
al Science building. Imperson-
ators and monologue men espec-
sally wanted.

referred to committees,
senators objecting to all
immediate consideration.

Democratic
requests for

WOLVERINE NEEDS TRYOUTS
J. Ellpworth Robinson, '19,
business manager-elect of the
Wolverine, summer publication
for the University, would like to
meet all students interested in
the business side of the paper at
5 o'clock Friday afternoon at
The Daily ofice.

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TUESDAY,
MAY 27, 1919
8 PM.

ADMISSION- 35 CENTS

4 SALE ON CAMPUS AND AT WAHR'S, GRAHAM'S, AND MICHIGAN UNION

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