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May 20, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-20

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PRO(ABLY
SHlOWERS

tlian tIatijx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DlY AND WILHT WIB
SERVICE

Lri rr. rr
1

VOL. XXIX. No. 163. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1919. PRICE THREE CE

I

PLN TO CREATE
OFFICE OfDEN
OF MENFAVORED
SUCH DEAN WOULD CONTROL ALL
ACTIVITIES OF
CAMPUS
OFFICE TO TAKE WORK
FROM COLLEGE DEANS
University Senate Proposes Solution
to Cope with Changed
Conditions
The Dean of Men proposition, which
is now in the hands of a committee of
the University Senate for report, orig-
inated when the Senate committee on
student affairs offered it to the pres-
ident and Senate council who, at a
special meeting devoted to the discus-
sion of the matter, adopted the reso-
lution. The proposition was in turn
submitted to the University Senate, the
latter then giling it to a sub-commit-
tee for consideration and report.
In regard to the new office the Sen-
ate committee on student affairs sub-
mitted to the Senate council the fol-
lowing:
"In the course of the past two dec-
ades, the extra-academic and quasi-
academic activities of the student body
have grown enormously in extent and
Importance. Many years ago the se-
riousness of the problems arising from
the increasing complexity of student
life was recognized by the University,
Senate, and this committee was cre-
ated to regulate the activities of stu-
dent organizations (except that ad-
minstering athletics) and to mediate
between the Senate and the student
body in affairs of University inter-
est. Since its foundation the volume
of the coimmittee's business and the
weight of its responsibilities have in-
creased year by year until today it is
face to face with a sense of its own
utter inadequacy to the needs of the
situation.
"Briefly stated, the fault in the pres-
ent adminstration of student affairs
rests in the fact that, though its name
has been changed, this committee re-
tains its original character as a com-
mittee on 'non-athletic organizations.'
Through the machinery of its sub-com-
mittees it has regulated, with varying
degrees of success, the plays, con-
certs and other entertainments given
by the many dramatic and musical
societies; it has controlled student
publications; it has regulated dances,
and other social functions; it has
maintained a relatively high academic
requirement for eligibility to partici-
pation in all public affairs; it has en-
couraged and assisted the fraternities
and sororities, house clubs, and cam-
pus societies in reforming their way
of life and improving their status in
the University; it has endeavored,
wherever possible, to co-operate sym-
pathetically with such self-governing
bodies as the Student council and the
Women's Judiciary council, and to in-
duce in the mind of the student body
a belief that the University authori-
ties would like to entrust student af-
fairs to 'student initiative.
"In all such matters the committee
believes that it has, in some degree,
accomplished the purpose for which it
was founded. But further it cannot go,
though much remains to be desired.
The fault inherent in our present sys-
tem is that, except in the case of the
women, the University, as such, does

not recognize the individual student as
existing. The several schools and col-
leges are more or less aware that a
law or medical student. is a human
being, but the University as a whole'
has no such purview. The individual
student can come before this commit-
(Continued on Page Six)
WYVERN TAKES IN ;
THIRTEEN WOMEN

f 13% ritish Airman
Lands In Europe
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
London, May 19.-Aviator Hawker
Is reported to be safe, acording to a
Central News dispatch from Trale,
Ireland. The dispatci adds that
Hawker droppedinto the sea thirty
miles from Valencia on the west coast
of County Kerry and south of Dingle
Bay.
London, Ma 19.-Up to 6 o'clock no
authoritative news has reached the
air ministry as to the whereabouts of
the Sopwith machine carrying Harry
Hawker and Lieutenant-Commander
Grieve who bggan their trans-Atlantic
flight yesterday.
Reports were current that two wire-
less messages had been picked up at
the Lizard wireless station. One said
that Hawker was still on his way at
4:14 o'clock in the afternoon. Thee
other which came from an unnamed
American steamer was to the effect
that Hawker was still flying at 4,:40
o'clock.
Nothing confirmatory of these mes-
sages has reached London. A wire-
less dispatch to the admiralty from
the Charlestown station says: "Sop-
with machine down in Lat. 52*:30',
North Long. 11 west which is about
40 miles west of th, mouth of Athe
Shannon."
Wathington, May 19.-After weath-
ering a 60 mile gale and heavy seas
the missing seaplane NC-3, flagship of
the American trans-Atantic squadron,
reached Ponta Del Gada harbor to-
day under her own power nearly 60
hours from the time she was forced
down by a fog when almost in sight of
the Azores on the record breaking
flight from Newfoundland to Lisbon
and Plymouth.
NC-3 Will Complete Flight.
With the NC-3 safe officials express-
ed belief that the big seaplane could
be put in Condition to continue the
flight to Lisbon and Plymouth, with
the NC-4 which was still held at arta
by unfavorable weather. The NC-1,
however, was definitely out of the
running as the result of the pounding,
she received after landing on the
water.
RED CROSS WILL ME
"POTS" INTO SWEATERS
BELGIANS NOT TO DISPORT DIS-
CARDED FROSH
HATS
With Cap night but a few days away,
the committee in charge wishes to em-
phasize its request that sophomores
and upperclassmen, as well as fresh-
men, bring their toques and throw
them in the boxes provided. Both
freshman "pots" and toques will be
made use of.
Made Into Sweater
Contrary to the general belief, this
"headgear" is not used as such by the
Belgians. The yarn from both "pots"
and toques is unravelled and used in
knitting sweaters. The Red Cross
says that they can make use of all
such material they can obtain.
Wood Hard to Get
With the plans for the evening prac-
tically completed, the committee is
having some trouble in obtaining wood
for the bonfire. It seems that many
merchants .are using paper boxes in
place of wooden, and toy manufactur-
ers are buying up all the available

wooden boxes. All the town mer-
chants have, however, been very good
about promising all boxes which come
to hand, to the committee.
Dieterle to Sing
Robert R. Dieterle, '21M, is to lead
the singing during the evening, and
it is expected that this will be quite
a feature of the occasion. All seniors
are to attend in cap and gown. A
complete program of the evening will
be announced Thursday.

G EEN' STOCKINGS
Comedy Club Production to Be Given
Thursday Evening at
Whitney
PLAY SUCCESS ON AMATEUR
AND PROFESSIONAL STAGE
A. E. W. Mason, British dramatist
and novelist, is the writer of "Green
Stockings," the three-act play to be
presented on Thursday night, May 22,
at the Whitney theater by the Comedy
club.
Mason Actor Himself
Originally an actor himself, Mr.
Mason was able to gauge the situations
which might make the most urgent
appeal to his audiences, his abilities
as an author making it possible to in-
vest these situations with lines abound-
ing in humor.
A wide list of successful plays, in-
cluding "The Prncess Clementina,"
"The Witness for the Defense," and
"Open Windows," demonstrate that Mr.
Mason has gained a reputation among
the foremost of the British dramatists.
Had Long N. T. Run
"Green Stockings," since enjoying
its first long run in New York, where
Margaret Anglin and H. Reeves Smith
played the leading roles, has proved
quite popular with stock companies
and amateur societies, having been
reproduced by the dramatic clubs of
the majority of the larger universities
of the country.
Mr. Don McIntyre, manager of the
Whitney, in whose theaters in Cleve-
land, Milwaukee, and Detroit, "Green
Stockings" has been played, declares
it to be one of the best of comedies,
%nd one which has been greatly en-
joyed in these cities.
Dress Rehearsal Tonight
Dress rehearsal will be held tonight
at the Whitney theater. It is expected
that the Girls' Glee club, which leaves
Thursday for a concert in Jackson,.
will attend this rehearsal. Afternoon
and evening practices were held yes-
terday in preparation for the dress
performance.
Tickets for the play have been plac-
ed on sale at the Busy Bee, at Wahr's
bookstore, and with the members of
the committee. The tickets sell at
50 and 75 cents, and may be reserved
at Wahr's or Sheehan's book stores.
STEWARDS TO ACT
ON BUYING SYSTEM
Final plans in forming an interfra-
ternity co-operative buying system
will be made at a meeting of all the
stewards or their representatives at 7
o'clock Tuesday night in the Union.
Much was accomplished toward the
furthering of such a scheme a week
ago but definite steps could not be
taken in spite of the fact that all the,
representatives present expressed sat-
isfaction with the plan. Since the last
meeting cards have been sent to all of
the fraternities asking them to have
their stewards present.
It is hoped that at least 40 will be
present in order 'that arrangements
may be made for buying part of the
.fall goods at the reduced prices which
it is expected may be secured by co-
operative buying.

I

BINGAY CONVERSANT
WITH COLLEGE MEN
To Speak Under Auspices of Pi Delta
Epsilon and Sigma Delta
Chii
DETROIT EDITOR HAS MANY
UNIVERSITY GRADS ON STAFF
Malcolm W. Bingay, managing edi-
tor of the Detroit News, who speaks at
4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon in
room.208 Tappan hall on "The No-
blesse Oblige of Journalism," has had
extensive dealings with Michigan men
and women engaged in metropolitan
newspaper work. On the News staff
are a number of University alumni.
Because of Mr. Bingay's experience
with college graduates, it is expected
that his lecture will be attended by all
interested in any phase of journalism.
First Address in City
Pi Delta Epsilon and Sigma Delta Chi
national journalistic fraternities, are
sponsoring Mr. Bingay's address,
which is the first he has ever given be-
fore a public audience in this city.
Prof. Fred Newton Scott, of the
rhetoric department, will introduce the
speaker. Other evidence of the impor-
tance which University newspaperdom
is attaching to the address .may be
found in the fact that several of the
classes in journalism and rhetoric will
be given an assignment based up-
on it.
NEOPHYTES ENTER
BARRISTERS' RANKS
A banquet at the Union at 6 o'clock
Monday night terminated the ebb of
the energies of the nine men initiat-
ed into Barristers, senior law honor-
ary society. Those taken in were:
B. B. Mathews, H. E. Braun, C. C. An-
drews, R. R. \Winslow, C. K. Patter-
son, S. J. Slavens, G. W. Struch-
.mann, S. G. Riley, and D. T. Mosir.
James E. Chenot was toastmaster
at the banquet and R. R. Winslow
spoke for the new men.
M. COPEAU CHANGES
LECTURE SUBJECT
"French Dramatic Renovatio' is
the subject that M. Jacques Copeau
will speak on Wednesday aternoon ac-
cording to a telegram received by
Prof. A. G. Canfield, head of the
French department, late Monday night.
M. Copeau's original subject was
'What Is French," with special ref-
(rence to dramatic art. Professor Can-
field wrote to M. Copeau a few days
ago telling him of the increased Inter-
est in dramatics on the part of the
students on the campus, and it is prob-
ably in consideration of this commu-
nication, that M. Copeau changed his
subject.
STUDENT COUNCIL WILL MEET
TODAY TO DISCUSS ELECTION
Animportant meeting of the Student
Council will be held at 7 o'clock Tues-
day night at the Union. Matters per-
tainng to coming election will be dis-
cussed. All members must be pres-
ent.

Late Wire, B11riefs
(By Associated Press)
Archangel, May 19.-Arrangements
are under way for the transportation
to England of the 339th American In-
fantry within 10 days' time.
The battalion, of the 13th Engineers
on the Archangel front and the rail-
way troops on the Murmansk front
will be the last American forces with-
drawn from North Russia according to
present plans.
- Helsingfors, May 19. -British war-
ships engaged the Russian Bolshevik
fleet in a 35 minute fight in the Bay
of Finland. The Bolshevik fled to
Kronstadt after one of their, vessels
had been sunk and another stranded.
London, May 19.-General Denikine,
who is personally conducting the ope-
rations of his anti-Bolshevik army
against the city of Tsaidam on the
Volga announces the capture of 100,-
000 prisoners and 28 guns from the
Bolsheveki. This news was tele-
graphed by the chief of the British
military mission at Ekaterinodar.
BAND BOUNCE SECURES
SIX YVAUDEVILLE ACTS

VARSITY BAND ESCORTS
YESTERDAY IN DETROIT
PARADE

:32D

Tickets for the annual Bounce of the
Varsity band, which is to be given
Tuesday, May 7, in Hill auditorium,
will go on sale for 35 cents today on
the campus and at Graham's and
Wahr's book stores.
A search for talent has secured the
management of the Bounce six acts
of talent which it is expected will be
the equal of any in past years. Be-
sides the vaudeville the band w'll play.
It is to make up deficits of trips to
,Chicago, Saginaw, Detroit, and to pay
for the equipment and uniforms of
the band that the Bounce is given each
year. Only yesterday the organization
played in Detroit for the return of the
Red Arrow division.
A great ovation was reecived.by the
band as they marched up Woodward
avenue playing "The Victors" as they
escorted the 32d in its victory parade.
This is their second trip to Detroit as
they recently played at a meeting of
the -Liberty loan captains, and it was
because of their phenomenal success
that the band was asked again.
Failure To Sign
Mleans Mrassacre
(By Associated Press)
Versailles, May 19.-The German
counsellor who expressed the view on
his return from Berlin today that the
German delegation would meet with
bodily harm if they did not sign the
treaty, said he based his declaration
on the peace hunger of the German
-people.
People Hunger for Peace
"You seem to fear that we will not
'sign the peace treaty," he said, "but
we will sign because if we were to go
back without concluding peace we
would be massacred on reaching Ber-
,in. The people hunger for peace and
are growing impatient. The question
that is eausing us most anxiety is tht
of commercial openings without which
we could not carry out, despite all our
good will, the clauses of the treaty."
Paris, May 19.-It is asserted by
newspapers that the council of four
,will decide to internationalize Fiume
because no other arrangement could
be accepted by both Italy and Jugo-
Slavia.
ADELPHI TO HOLD
MEETING TONIGHT
Adelphi House of Representatives
will hold its final active meeting of the
year at 7:30 o'clock tonight in its
rooms on the fourth floor of U-hall.
Election of officers will take place and
plans for the coming year will be dis-
cussed.
The Adelphi freshman debating team
Is rounding into shape for the annual
debate with the Alpha Nu freshmen,
which will be held May 30th. The win-
ning of the freshmen cup this year by
the Adeph will leave one more year
to battle for the permanent possession
of the cup, and interest runs high re-
garding the outcome of this year's de-
bate.

MICHIGAN WALKS
AWAY WITH IOW
BALL GAME, 8B
WOLVERINES PLACE HITS IN
RIGHT GARDEN; GARRETT
HITS TWO BAGGER
KARPUS SLUGS HOMER;
PARKS STRIKES OUT 1
Mae and Blue Diamond Stars Saot
Sphere for 13 Hits Oft
Hamilton
Team W L; t
Mich'gan',.............4 0 1000
Illinois.... . ... .......5 1 .833
Iowa ..................3 2 .00
Indiana . ................2 2 .500
Ohio State..............1 1 .500
Chicago ................2 4 .33
Wisconsin ...... ....1 4 .200
Purdue.................0 4 .000
(Special to The Daily)
Iowa City, Ia., May 19.-Michigan
substantiated its supremacy as the
leader of the Conference In baseball
here today when the Wolverines de-
feated Iowa University, the prospective
champions to the tune of 8-1.
With a home run credited to Kar-
pus, a three bagger to Knode and Gar-
rett and a two base hit to Van Boven,
besides the other safe bingles, the final
number of hits registered off the Iowa
pitcher numbered 13.
Parks Fans 10
Ten strike out credited to Parks
were responsible for the low score
of the opposition, while the few hits
that the home team could place, were
speedily fielded by the.vIsIting nine.
Michigan started the C02in3 Zith9
first inning, and did not give up
turn at bat until a comple = i0
of the diamond had been made. Ia
was unable to recover until the se-
and inning, when their only counter
came.
From then on, it was easy sailing
for the Maize and Blue. In fourth
inning, the Wolverines connected with
the ball a sufficient number of times
to increase the count by four runs,
while in the eighth round, they annex-
ed three more.
Irish Replaces Belding
Practically all of the Michigan slug-
ging was directed to Belding In right
field, who found it unable to han1 1
the hot drives of the Wolverines, which
had penetrated the infield. He was re-
placed by Irish, who attempted to stop
,the work of the visiting team, but
without avail.
Out of five times at bat, the Michi-
gan captain, Knode, slammed out three
safe hits. One of them brought him
to third base without a stop. Karpus'
home run was probably the feature of
the contest, for the home pitcher was
supposed to be impregnable.
Both teams used 10 men in the con-
test, and both substituted fielders.
Michigan sent Van Boven into the con-
test for Cooper, who in his turn If:
bat, connected with the ball for the
two base hit.
The contest places Michigan in the
supreme position in the Big Ten stand-
ing, with no one able to dispute it be-
'sides Illinois. However, Illinois, ear-
lier in the season, fell before the Iowa
aggregation. This leaves Michigan the
only undefeated nine in the Confer-
ence.
(Continued on Page Six)

J'icigan Alumnae
Start Big Drive
Duties of senior women as alumnae
will begin tomorlow, with the opening
of a campaign to raise money for the
paying off of the debt on Alumnae
residence. The debt is $4,000 and it
is hoped that $3,000 of it wjll be sub-
scribed by Michigan alumnae from all
over the country and that the remain-
ing $1,000 will be subscribed by the
senior women now.
The campaign will be managed by
Jennie A. Duemling, '19, and a -com-
mittee of 20 girls. They will canvass
all dormitories, league houses, and so-
,rority houses and .speecehs will be
made in each one for the purpose of
interesting senior women in this re-
sponsibility. Eacll girl will be asked
to subscribe $5, the pledges to be pay-
able between now and next year.

UNION PLANS TO HAVE "CHIN CHIN"
VETERAN TEACH TERPSICHOREAN ART

In order to give prospective tryouts
for the opera next year a chance to
learn the rudiments of stage dancing,
and thus eliminate some of the delay
experienced this year, the Union has
arrangd for Roy Hoyer, conceded to
be one of the best male dancers in
America, to come to Ann Arbor for
several days beginning May 26, to give
dancing lessons.
Mr. hloyer has been dancing for the
last two years with Fred Stone in
"Jack o' Lantern," and previous to
that in "Chin Chin." The fact that' he
has a five year contract with the
Dillingham interests, and that this is
the only time he can get off to come to
Michigan, makes it necessary to hold
the classes at this tinie.
Besides the rudiments of stage
dancing, Mr. Hoyer will instruct in
aesthetic dancing, so that some solo
dancers may be developed for next
year's opera. An attempt was made
to introduce a few of these dancers in
"Come On, Dad," but none of sufficient
ability could be found.
One or two special classes will also

be open to women of the University,
that the Junior Girls' play may benefit
by Mr. Hoyer's coming, as well as
the opeia. They will be conducted
separately.
Only a limited number of pupils will
be accepted for the classes, so that
Mr. Hoyer can give everybody the
benefit of individual attention. Any-
one who wants further instruction can
get it, however, by arranging for spec-
ial private lessons.
Although those who take the lessons
will have an advantage in the compet-
ition for places in the cast and chorus,
the Union wishes it understood, to
avoid misunderstanding next year,
that taking the lessons will not as-
sure places in the company.
Tuition for the course of 10 les-
sons has been made very low. Furth-
er information, and reservations for
the course, can be made by calling
at the Union personally, or by tele-
phone, and asking for Mr. E. Mortimer
Shuter, director of "Come On, Dad,"
who is superintending part of the ar-
rangements for the opera next year.

Thirteen sophomores were initiated
into the whys and wherefores of Wy-
vein, junior Ahonorary society, yester-
day afternoon at the home of Ruth
Jennings, '20. The initiates were:
Alice Beckham, Beatrice Beckwith,
Alice Comlossy, Marguerite Clark, Al-
lis Hussey, Lois DeVries, Marcella
Moon, Mary Dee Lane, Martha Seeley,
Esther Paffenbach, Josephine McGin-
nis, Alice Hinkson, and Helen Masters.
The newly elected members will give
a party for the older. members on,

O4$GANIZATIONS, NOTICE!
All orgnizations who are to
be represented iin the All-Cam-
pus election May 22, must send
two delegates to the Union at 7
o'clock tonight to receive in-
structions.

.I

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