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May 18, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAIR

I

TODAY

001.

AIL-
AW

4:3att

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 162.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1919.

PRICE THREE

YEARLINGS FGHT
SOPHS0TO TIEIN
SPRING CONTESTS
BOTH CLASSES BTTTLE HARD FOR
HONORS IN A L ATHLETIC
GAMES
CLASS OF '22 WINS BIG
VICTORY IN BAG RUSH
Second Year Men Obtain Possession
of Rope and "Tenderly Escort
it to Stable"
'Twenty-two against '21, brawn
against brawn and a tie . score re-
sulted.
A final tally of the points of the
Spring games won by the two under-
classes showed that each had secured
four and one-half of the fought for,
hoped, for, and even cursed-for, nine.
Although the sophomores won the rope
and brought it back, the freshmen are
strong in telling the world that they
"licked the sophs to a finish" in the
bag rush. The fighting honors belong
equally to each of the valiant foes and
the spoils of the combat are to both
classes.
Two Classes Equal with Canes
The result of the strenuous efforts
of-the picken men in the cane spree,
the first contest of the day, was a tie
score. Each side was credited with
one-half, a point. The relay obstacle
races were then run off with a thrilling
accompaniment of paint and vociferous
arguments with the referees. The first
of the races went to the sophomores,
the next to. the freshmen, and in the
last race the red flag came in a few
feet in front of the green one. Having
won a majority of the runs, the class
of '21 was given the two points. The
score was then two and one-half to the
freshmen's one-half.
Due to the practically complete turn
out of the first year men, the sopho-
mores battled first one-half of the
greens in the tug-of-war and, then the
(Continued on Page Six)
403STLL M IiG;
NC-4 FE AT AZORES
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 17. - The NC-3
flagship of the Naval transatlantic sea-
plane squadron, still was missing to-
night fter having negotiated two-thirds
of the 1,350 miles from Trepassy Bay,
Newfoundland, to the Azores, the mid-
ocean station, on the overseas flight
course.
Although strenuous efforts had been
made to get some word from the high
ship, the fate of Commander John
Henry Towers and his crew of four
men was unknown at the navy depart-
ment.
The NC-1, Lieut. Commander Pat-
rick N. L. Bellinger's ship; was forced
to descend to the surface of the ocean
200 miles from Fayal after becoming
lost in the fog and, at last reports to
the navy department, four destroyers
were rushing- to her assistance. She
was undamaged and had sufficient fuel
to cary her on, as her S. o. S. calls
simply asked for bearings.
The NC-4, the "lame duck" of the
overseas squadron, was safe at Horta
on the Island of Fayal tonight, hav-
ing landed at 9:20 o'clock ,this morn-
ing, Washington time, after a remark-
ably fast passage from the starting
point. Lieut. Commander Albert C.
Read was expected to take his ship
to Ponta Delgada tomorrow for the
dash to Lisbon, where the transocean
flight would be completed.
London, May 17.-The commander of
the NC-4, describing the flight to the
correspondent of the Weekly Dispatch

stationed at Horta, said that he flew
his machine at 10,000 feet until he cit-
ed the Island of Corvo. He then de-
scended to 200 feet owing to the fog.
Half an hour before his arrival, the
NC-4 was forced by the fog to alight
oan the water in search of a harbor.
When this was located the flight was
resumed and the airplane got along-
side the cruiser Columbus. It. was
reported that the NC-1 had alighted on
the water nearby but expected to ar-
rive at any moment.

EDITOR OF DETROIT
NEWS TO TALK HERE
Malcolm W. Bingay, managing edi-
tor of the Detroit News, will speak on
the "Noblesse Oblige of Journalism"
at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon In
the history lecture room in Tappan
hall.
He comes to Ann Arbor under the
joint auspices of Pi Delta Epsilon and
Sigma Delta Chi, national journalistic
fraternities. Mr. 'Bingay's lecture will
be the first he has ever given before
a public audience in this city, and it
is expected that many will avail
themselves of the opportunity to hear
him.
Inasmuch as he has had much ex-
perience with college men and women
in the field of metropolitan journal-
ism, Mr.. Bingay is considered to be
able to speak with authority along
these lines. On his staff are a num-
ber of graduates of the University.
FAUST SCORES HIT
CLOSING FESTIVL
Fernando Carpi and Miss Fitziu Please
in Gounard's Master-
piece
COURBOIN TILRLLS AUDIENCE
WITH FEW ORGAN RENDITIONS
(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Gounard's romantic opera, "Faust,"
sung by a cast of representative stars
accompanied by the University Choral
union and the brilliant orchestration
of the Chicago Symphony concluded
Ann Arbor's Victory Commemorative
festival last night amid the ringing
cheers of Hill auditorium's vast audi-
ence.
Fernando Carpi set a histrionic
standard for the interpretation of
"Faust" which it will be hard for any
artist to surpass. His splendid vocal
equipment enables him to successfully
carry the part of the serious, pessimis-
tic recluse and the rejuvenated lover.
Miss Fitziu Stars in "Faust" Selection
Miss Anna Fitziu gave a grippingly,
realistic impersonation of the charm-
ingly lovely yet pathetically sorrowful,
Marguerite.
Minerva Komenarski sang Marta and
Seibel in an artistically tempermen-
tal manner. Her voice is suave and
even-flowinga showing technical finesse
and beautiful legato quality.
De Segurola Portrays "Fauste'
The deep voice of Andres de Segu-
rola was well-suited for the singing
of Mephistopheles. When in the throes
of evil intent there was always a re-
serve force of power and in the laugh-
ing passages a glimpse of his dramatic
ability was apparent.
Carl Formes, formerly associated
with Mme. Melba, took the role of the
tempermental Valentine, who was the
heroic, loving, fallen, and unforgiving,
brother in turn.
Soldier Chorus Brings Applause
Robert R. Dieterle, '18, deserves fav-
orable comment for his interpretation
of Brander. There is no doubt that he
possesses all the qualifications and
the personality of a comingbaritone
virtuoso, and he was by no means
overshadowed by his distinguished fel-
low-artists. Mr. Dieterle's voice is pure
and unaffected, ringing true in every
Instance and displaying both tempera-
ment and artistic conscience.
Frieze Memorial organ was most ef-
fectively introduced in the church
scene with Prof. Earl V. Moore as or-
ganist
The familiar Soldier Chorus was
given much applause which resulted
in Professor Stanley's responding with
a repetition.
Act .V brought the program to a
close with a struggle between the deep
(Continued on Page Six)

All- Campus Election Nominees
Following is the list of the nominees of the various campus
organizations who will be voted on at the All-Campus election,
Thursday, M~ay 22.
MICHIGAN UNION
President of Union-Ralph E. Gault, '21L; Carl T. Hogan, 20E; F.
Cortez Bell, 211; Thomas F. McAllister, (by petition).
Recording Secretary-C. P. Scegafer, '20A; Edwin S. Larsen, '20.
Law Vice-President-Rolland Winslow, '201; James McClntock,
'21L.
Engineering Vice-President-Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E; John
Reilly, '20E.
Medic Vice-President-Harold Makinson, '21M; Joseph Palma, '20.
Literary Vice-President-WilliamW. Hinshaw, '20; William A. Let-
zAnger, '20.
Combined Departments Vice-President-C. J. Clem, '20D; M. S.
Ballard, '2011.
Faculty Members of Board of Directors-Dean Henry M. Bates,
Law; Prof. John C. Parker, Eng.; Prof Henry C. Adams, Lit.
STUDENT COUNCILMEN AT LARGE
(Three to be Elected)
Cecil Andrews, '20L; Carl Johnson,'20; G. G. Whitney, '20; E. Mules,
'21; Thomas McAllister, '211; LeGrand Gaines, '21E.
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Football Manager-Hart H. Anderson, '20; Mathew S. Towar, '20.
Assistant Football Manager-(Four to be Elected)-Herman J. De-
Lano, '21; Robert E. McKean, '21; Joseph Gebhardt, '21E; Rich-
ard G. Marshall, '21E; Ray Corwin, '21E; J. Tedford Bachman,
'21E; Schuyler Smith, '21E; Hyman Levinson, '21.
Basketball Manager-C. B. Shoemaker, '20E; W. G. Harbert, '20E.
Assistant Basketball Manager-(Four to be Elected)-D. A. Long-
necker, '21E; D. G. Porter, '21E; D. it. Logan, '21E;R . F. Grind-
ley,'21E; M. Penick, '20.
Track Manager-H. L. Popp, '20; G. P. Schafer, '20A.
Assistant Track Manager-(Four to be Elected)-R. 0. Fischer,
'21E; D. A. Forbes, '21; G. L. Rourke, '21; J. A. Spence, '21E;
1). B. Stratton, '21E; W. B. Weathers, '21E; H. Whiting, 2nd, '21;
W. H. Wirt, '21.
Baseball Manager-WilliamB ade, ''20; Andrew Dornan, '20; Harry
House, '20.
Assistant Baseball Manager-y-(Four to be Elected)-William Baks-
lee, '21L; Notary Gleason, '21; Ernest Armstrong, '21; Jack
Foley, '21; Cecil Rorick, '21; Frederick Storrer, '21; Frederick
Trhompson, '21; Donald J. Porter, '21.
Y. . C. A.
President-J. E. Goodwillie, '20E; R. J. McCandless, '21M.
Vice-President-H. B. Vinkelmulder, '20; D. M. Thompson, '20.
Secretary-I!Frost, '21E; K. Chdester, '20.
STUDENT COUNCILMEN
Junior Laws-R. R. Winslow, E. J. Blackert, B. B. Matthews.
Sophomore Lits-Fred Petty, William Wirt, Lawrence Butler.
Junior Architets-E. G. Jehle, G. P. Schafer, G. H. Benjamin.
Sophomore Engineers-N. D. Weathers, H. H. Lippincott, P. Mc-
Lanth.
Junior Medics-James S. Ilump, Joseph A. Kerwin, G orge F.
Moore.
Junior Dents-L. R. Hirth, E. R. Drevdahl.
Junior Lits-J. P. Hart, David Nash, David Landis.
Pharmies-H. E. Sayles, F. J. Helbig.
BOARD IN CONTRL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
(Three to be Elected)
Harold AMackinson, '21M; Earl Cress, '20; Joseph V. Tracy, '20E;
Burton A. Garlinghouse, '20; William M. LeFevre, '19-'23M;
DavidB. Landis, '20; Ralph E. Gault, '21L; Carl H. Velde, '20;
Cecil C. Andrews, '20L.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
President-J. il. Darbarker, C. R. Ford.
Vice-President-A. B. Weston, B. Douglas.
Secretary-Robert Storrer, Arthur Heimerdinger.
Treasurer-Stanley Lowe, M. F. Gardner.
ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY
Pesdent-E. D. Straight, L. A. Abel.
Vice-President-K. Rindge, H. Booth, C. Hubach.
Secretary-A. R. Wagner, L. F. Schott, M. Morse.
Treasurer--G. H. Benjamin, J. H. Page, J. C. Goddeyne.
Honor Committeeman-S. G. Wiener,\J. H. Benjamin, J. C. Goddeyne.
ENGINEERING HONOR COMMITTEE
Freshmen-(Two to be Elected)-John Madden, Alfred May, Brt-
lett Booth, Arthur Stock.}
Sophomores-(Two to be Elected)-C. G. Wetzel, L. A. Gaines, J.
H. Pilkington, W. H. Blodgelt.
Juniors-(Two to be Elected)-J. C. Edwards, J. Darbarker, J. P.
Dickinson, L. Shinder.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
President-Herman A. August, Carl G. Brandt.
Vice-President-Anna McGurk, Florabell Ells.
Secretary-Ida B. Gratton, Olive Smith.
Treasurer-James K. Pollock, Lawrence H. Seltzer.
Delegates at Large-(Eight to be Elected)-Jane Bartland; Earl
Baxell, Earl Dunn, Leland Gait, Kelsey Guilfoil, Eliza McRobb,
Earl Miles, Simon Shetzer, George True, D. A. Watts.

"THE MICHIGAN CHIMES" MAKESBOW
T MPSIFLLNW WILL ACT AS UNIVERSITY BULLETlI

SPRING GARGOYLE
APPEARS MONDAY
The May number of the Gargoyle,
which will be on sale Monday, is in
reality a re-incarnation of the spirit
of springtime. Like the School of
Music it is breezy and airy and a
scream from beginning to end.
It contains the following features:
Afthony and Cleopatra, as Shake-
speare would have written it today.
Why Canta Loped, a thrilling short
story after the fashion of the Russian
school, Our Own Primer, a lesson for
the wayward youth and 44 new and
original jokes. The issue promises to
be one o fthe most popular of this year
TRCTEMLICKS
MAOON,93-42
E. H. Moore Cheats Captalmi Sedgwick
Out of Two Mile
Honors
CARL JOHNSON SCORES 20
POINTS IN FOUR EVENTS
Michigan won theatrack meet from
Chicago, Saturday afternoon, by the
overwhelming score of 93 to 42.
The Wolverines' victory was even
more decisive than the followers of
the sport had predicted, Coach Far-
rell's men taking all three places in
the javelin throw, which was one of
the events that had been conceded to
the Maroons.
Sedgwick Loses Two Mile
Probably the biggest surprise of the
meet was the defeat of Sedgwick in the
two mile run. Captain Sedgwick was
expecting keen competition from Mc-
Cosh in this race, but Coach Stagg
kept McCosh out of the event and sub-
stituted E. H. Moore against the Mich-
igan distance man. E. H. Moore proved
to 3be a dark horse, sticking close to
Sedgwick all through the race and fin-
ally out-sprinting him in the last lap.
Speer, of Chicago, ran a spectacular
race in the half-mile run, making the
880 yards in one minute 57 and 2-5
seconds in the face of a strong wind.
In this race Burkholder took second
place in about 1: 59, the best timethat
he has ever made. He showed good
form and promises to develop into a'
fast half miler before his two more
years at the University are finished.
Five Clean Sweeps Recorded
Coach Farrell's squad took all three
places in five out of the 14 events and'
did not fail to place in any of them.
Chicago lacked sprinters, being able
to do no better than fourthin either
the 100 or 220 yard dashes.
Carl Johnson carried away first
place in all of the four events that he
entered, the broad and high jumps, and
the low and high hurdles. Losch came
second in the way of honors, taking
first place in the 100 and 220 yard
dashes.
Butler ran the quarter mile in per-I
fect form, and it is thought that he7
could have bettered his time some if;
he had been pushed harder.' Speer,i
who took second place, was set back
six yards for breaking at the start.-
Wesbrook surprised everyone by
broad-jumping 22 feet 7 in., only four
inches less tha Carl Johnson, who
took first place. Wesbrook's best1
jumps up till this meet were around
20 feet.
(Continued on page three)

BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS SEEKS FOR
STUDENT COMMENT
T. F. MC ALLISTER EDITS
LATEST PUBLICATION
Members of Honorary, Literary and
Executive Organizations Gain
Editorial Places
By action taken at yesterday's meet-
ing, the Board in Control of Student
Publications in a resolutin established
a new campus magazine, to be called
"The Michigan Chimes," and elected
Thomas F. McAllister, '21L, managing
editor, and Walter Riess, '20, business
manager, for the year 1919-1920.
Including an advisory editorial
board made up of representatives of
the campus honorary, literary, and ex-
ecutive organizations, and the propos-
al to make the publication the forum
of expression for questions concern-
ing the University, the following res-
olution was passed:
Plan to Develop Campus Spirit
"Resolved - That in order to pro-
vide a means for developing a broad-
er university spirit among the stu-
dentstof the University of Michigan,
and to afford the medium for the In-
terchange of views relating to univer-
sity life and ideals between the mem-
bers of the various schools, colleges,
and student organizations, the Board
in Control of Student Publications
hereby establish a new student maga-
zine to be called The Michigan Chimes.
"Resolved further - That it be con-
ducted under the auspices of an ad-
visory editorial board consistingnof the
President of the Michigan Union, the
President of the Student Council, the
President of the Athletic association,
the President of the Women's League,
a representative chosen by Michi-
gauma, a representative chosen by the
Quadrangle club, and representatives
of such other organizations as may be
hereafter determined by the Board in
Control -of Student Publications.
Subscription Price to Be Set Later
"Resolved further - That Thomas
F. McAllister, '21L, be appointed man-
aging editor, and Walter Riess, '20,
business manager of this magazine for
the year, 1919-1920, salaries to be ad-
justed later, on substantially the same
basis as in the case of The Gargoyle
and the Michiganensian.
"Resolved further - That the sub-
scription price be left to the super-
vising business manager with power."
New Paper Acts as Forum
It is believed with the establishment
of the new magazine, a new era isen-
te'red upon in the historyy of student
publications at the University of Mich-
(Continued on Page Six)

WOLVERINES NOSE OUT
CHICAO MEN IN NINTH
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, May 17.-Michigan turned
Chicago day into a blue: one for the
Maroons, for the Wolverine athletes,
after winning the tennis matches and
track meet at Ann Arbor, made a third
victory by winning from the Windy
City nine 4 to 3.
Coach Lundgren's proteges won the
game by a ninth inning batting rally,
after the Chicago men apparently had
the game on ice. Pheney, batting for,
Langenhan in the ninth, slammed out
a triple, which was followed by an-
other triple by Schluntz, batting for
Glenn. The two following men were
put out. Bowerman soaked the pill for
a doubl'e, bringing in the winning
run.
Glenn pitched the entire game, strik-
ing out 10 Maroons. Bowerman was
the star of the contest, making two
doubles and a sensational catch in
right field.
The Michigan men showed a better'
batting eye, Schluntz, Pheney, and
Karpus succeeded in batting three base
hits, Score by innings:
'''' ""'''1 2"3 4 5 6 78s 9 B H
Michigan. ...1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 4-10
Chicago . ....0 201000003-2

.1

Reserve your seats for
"GREEN STOCKINGS"

On Sale Monday at 9 at Wahr's and Graham's

Huron and Division
10.30 A. M.
Leonard A. Barrett
Is Organic Unity of Protestantism Possible?

Presbyterian (
61P.-M.I
Prof. T. E. Rankin Yo
A Study in the Books of the Bible Sunday

church
6:30 P. M.

Huron and Division
7:30 P. M.
William Moll Case
(Just returned from France)
The Sinews of a Victory-A Message 'from
Verdusn

dung People's
Evening Se

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