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May 17, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-17

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THE WEATHER

l

PROBABLY FAIR
TODAY

000,

trigaut

&flt4ilx

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

,.

VOL. XXIX. No. 161. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1919. PRICE THREE C

.,.....

MAY FESTIVAL AUDIENCE CHARMED
BICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA;
MADAME HOMER SCORES BIG HIT

TREMENDOUS APPLAUSE CALLS
CONTRALTO BACK FOR
SIX ENCORES
SINGER SUPPORTED BY
ORCHESTRAL NUMBERS

THIS

AFTERNOON'S PROGRAM
WILL BE OPENED WITH
"PASSACAGLIA"

"FAUST" WILL CLOSE
CONCERT OF EVENING

I GERMANS PREPARE NOTE FOR ALLIES;
CHINESE ENVOY ORDERED NOT TO SIGN
(By Associated Press) monst of the time. The main conflict
Paris, May 16.-It became known to- is over the constitutionality of the
day that the German peace delegation parliament sitting in Pekin under con-
was preparing to send another note 'trol of the northern government. Re-
to the allied and associated powers cent reports have been that a com-
concerning the peace treaty. The note, promise appeared imminent.
which has not yet geen completed, is
said to be in relation to Alsace and (By Associated Press)
Lorraine. ; Paris, May 16.-The United States
-- battleship U. S. S. Arizona and four
(By Associated Press) United States cruisers have arrived at
kSymrna according to an Athens dis-
New York, May 16, --1The Chinese patch.
caiilet reported to have resigned )n: Advices to the peace conference say
Paris dispatches todaydecided to in- that transportscarrying Greek troops
stret the delegation at Paris not to have sailed from Saloniki for Smyrna.
sign t he treaty :according to a dis- Debarkation of Troops Begun
pal ch from Pekin, dated May 7. It is In connection with the military and
not unlikely the proper resignation has naval movement to Symrna L'Intransi-
some connection with the Chinese gent says that allied troops already
feeling over the decision of the peace have been debarked. It says that the
conference concerning Shantung. concentration at Smyrna is a precau-
* Shanghai Session Deadlocked tion being taken against the day when
t Representatives of northern and the peace conditions imposed on the
southern China have been in session Turks will be put into effect and when
at Shanghai for several months, but the Turks may be invited to leave Eu-
the conference has been deadlocked for rope.

Gabrlowtsch Thrills Audience wit
His Brilliant Performance in
Afternoon
(By Paul A. Shinkman)
Once more has a May Festival aud:
ence surrendered to the charm o:
America's premiere contralto - Mm
Louise Homer, who appeared as sok
ist with the Chicago Symphony or
chestra last night in the fourth Festi.
val concert.
In spite of the fact that Madam
Homer, has already appeared eigh
times in Ann Arbor, she was given
tremendous welcome such as no indi
vidual 1919 Festival artist has yet re
ceived, and was compelled to give si:
encores in addition to her three sched
uled appearances on the program.
Displays Versatility
Her first number of the evening wa
Beethoven's stately aria, "The heaven
are telling the Lord's endless glory,
which was followed with one of th
artist's own favorites - the Bac
aria, "My heart ever faithful." In th
second half of the program, Madam
Homer sang Debussey's "The year
roll by no comfort bringing" and th
entrancing gavotte-aria, "'Tis I! all i
now broken" from "Mignon." The firs
was delivered with a somber majest
which seemed to grip the great audi-
ence until the artiste broke forth wit
the rippling gavotte-aria.
The most dit lt of the coutrlto
numbers was her concluding aria, "C
fatal dower" from Verdi's "Don Car-
los," which served admirably to exhib.
it her genuine dramatic power, which
has achieved such success for her o
the Metropolitan opera stage. Her en-
cores included such favorites as Han-
del's "Largo" from "Xerxes," and "My
heart at thy sweet voice" from "Sam-
son and Delihh."
Unusual Qualities
Madame Homer has a voice of
breadth and experience which is un-
fortunately too unusual among mod-
ern concert singers. Its rich, full tone
combined with a personality which is
positively radiant, left the audience
clamoring for encore after encore.
The orchestral numbers on the pro-
gram were Dvorak's "Carneval" over-
ture, Mozart's Symphony in Q minor,
"The Enchanted Forest" by d'Indy,
and the Delibes suite, "Sylvia." These
were all presented in the finished
manner which Festival patrons have
come to expect from this orchestra, es-
pecially the last with its brilliant
Prelude, languorous Valse, played with
muted strings, delicate Pizzicati, and
sweeping Cortege de Bacchus.
Star Berates "Frosh"
What will be the war's effect upon
.music? - Nobody can say, and I real-
ly mustn't hazard a guess, although
we know that it is making a tremen-
dous change," said Madame Homer
between numbers. Then she laughed
and added:
"Yes, I have read your Daily and
you may tell the "Frosh" for me that I
consider them very naughty to hold
their dances on the night of my con-
cert. Tell them I feel greatly slight-
ed, but I know that some day when
they become juniors, they will think
better of me."
Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms, the
great musical trinity, were represent-
ed on the Symphony matinee program
of the May Festival concert yesterday
afternoon by Ossip Gabrilowitsch and
the Chicago Symphony orchestra, un-
der the baton of Frederick Stock.
Mr. Gabrilowitsch played the
Brahms Concerto for Pianoforte in B
flat major in a manner that deserves
praise . of the highest order. The
rngany technical difficulties were mas-
tered with the utmost finesse and ease.

In the Scherzo movement his brilliant
thrilling sparkled with breath and
life. ,
Mr. Stock responded to innumerable
recalls after the Beethoven symphony
which was greatly appreciated by the
audience. He has the rare character-
istic of making his men catch his vis-
ion and inspiring optimism.

UNDERCIASSES WILL BATTLE -FOR
SPRING GAMES' SUPREMACY TODAY,
TUG-OF-WAR SCHEDULED FOR NOO

C'arpi, Anna Fltzlu, Segurola,
i, eterle Will Take Solo,
Parts

and

Frieze Memorial organ gave proof
of its wonderful possibilities last year
when the famous French organist, Jo-
seph Bonnet, gave the Saturday aft-
ernoon program. The organ will be
played this afternoon by another dis-
tinguished artist when Charles M.
Courboin, the Belgian virtuoso, ap-
pears. The program will begin at 2:30
o'clock.
* Bach's "Passacaglia" in C minor will
open the program. It will be followed
by two Preludes in E major, composed
by Saint-Saens, who has written ex-
tensively for the organ of which he
is a master.
The next numbers will be De Boeck's
"Allegretto," Ravenello's "Christus
Rhesurrexit,' 'and two movements from
Cesar Franck's "Grand Piece Sym-
phonique." Schumann's "Sketch" N,
3 will furnish a lighter touch to the
program and will be followed by Yon's
"Echo" and "The Primitive Organ."
Cesar Franck's great "Piece Heroi-
que" will be the concluding number.
"Faust" in Evening
Gounod's immirtal romantic opera,
"Faust," which will furnish a brilliant
finale to the May Festival when it will
be sung at the evening concert, needs
little comment. Its familiar arias and
'choruses never fail to bring a round,
of applause, and as interpreted by the
distinguished list of solists, the Uni-
versity Choral union, and the Chicago
Symphony orchestra, conducted by Dr.
A. A. Stanley, are bound to prove dou-
bly welcome.
Famous Soloists
The solo parts will be taken by Fer-
nandi Carpi as Faust, Anna Fitziu as
Marguerite, Andres de Segurola ast
Mephistopheles, Emilio de Gogorza as.
=Valentine, Minerva Komenarski in the

two roles of Siebel and Marta,

and

Robert R. Dieterle as Wagner. Maid-
ens, Old Women, Students, and Sol-
diers choruses will be sung by the
Choral union. Prof. Earl V. Moore
of the School of Music will be organ-
1st.
t.
Frosh Frolic Is
implyGr
"The best and nothing but the best"
was the slogan of the committee in
charge of last night's Frosh Frolic.
The Pontchartrain's "syncopators,"
Detroit's best orchestra, came up to the
expectations of the Detroiters and ex-
ploded the knocks of those from Chi-
cago and the east. Although the pro-
grams, and some say the punch also,
suffered-at the hands of a few jealous
class rivals the fortunate young la-
dies were unanimous in proclaiming
the affair "simply grand."
Confetti, balloons, and fancy caps
livened the party, if that were possi-
ble, and the programs were pleasingly
unique. A clever decoration scheme in
green and white was followed out.
"Pat" Conway entertained the fresh-
men and their ladies with a solo dur-
ing one intermission.
A noticeable sprinkling of upper-
classmen among the first year men
showed that contest of terpischorean
art" was at least "worth while attend-
ing." In fact everyone seemed to be4
enjoying himself.
ARCHITECTS JUDGE
STUDENTS WORK
Introducing a new plan for the1
grading of problems and designs of
the students of the architectural de-t
partment of the University, three De-
troit architects yesterday judged the
work of the sophomore and junior-
classes. The students worked prob-
lems and designs on a library and
garage.
Providing the plan meets with suc-
cess, it is proposed that it be per-
manent. It offers the student a more
practical judgment of his work.
The three architects who judged the
work yesterday were: George F. Ma-
son, president of the state registry
board of architects; Chas. Kotting,
president of the Michigan chapter of
the American Institute of Architects;
and E. A. Shilling, president of the
Michigan Society of Architects.

AMERICN NAVAL PLANES
S9TAR TLNICFLIGHT
NC-3 FIRST TO LEAVE ON LONG
PROJECTED
FEAT
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 16. - American
naval seaplanes started on the long
projected flight across the Atlantic
ocean shortly after 6 o'clock New York
time tonight. This official announce-
ment was made at the Navy depart-
ment.
The announcement said that the NC-
3 left at 6:06, the NC-4 at 6:07, and
the NC-1 at 6:09 o'clock, the time be-
in on the basis of New York compu-
ta Fion.
An official dispatch from Trepassey
Bay reported that the three planes had
passed from sight in their eastward
flight at 6:20 psm.
Dirigible C5 Lost
Washington, May 16.-The Navy de-
partment tonight !made public the
following dispatch received from the
commander of the destroyer Edwards
upon return of the vessel to Newfound-
land.
"Dirigible C-5 lost. Unable to learn
whether merchant ship that reported
it has abandoned or rescued it. Ed-
wards unable to locate either of them."
COLLEGE MEN NOT
ALWAYS OFFICERS
College trained men do not neces-
sarily make the best army officers, ac-
cording to Gen. John Henry Sher-
burne who is quoted in the Harvard
Crimson,
Many of the best officers during thej
war were men of mediocre education,
General Sherburne further states, and
he goes on to say that the ability of a
man to lead and not merely being a
student should determine whether a
commission should be granted. This
ability may best be found out by hav-
ing all prospective officers serve a pe-
riod of enlistment. This gives theme
the viewpoint of the enlisted man and
also if they show ability as sergeants1
and corporals it is reasonable to be-
lieve that they will show the same1
ability as officers..
Derby Rapes Expect Large Crowdsc
London, May 16.-This year's Der-s
by at Epsom, the first since before1
war, is expected to bring out one of
the largest crowds in the history of the
amous rce.
The picturesque procession of coach-F
es, brake and donkey carts of the oldt
lays, from London to Epsom, is ex-y
pected to give way this June to a long n
line of speeding automobiles. e
Queen Given Medical Degree
Brussels, May 16.-Queen Elizabeth v
>f Belgium has been nominated Doc- e
:or of Medicine by the University of n
Liege, in recognition of her work as t
urse throughout the war. The Rec-
;or of the University handed the di- e
>loma to the Queen and read an ad- p
ress from the faculty in her honor.N

SIGMA XI CHOOSES 42
IN ANUL ELECTION
NATIONAL HONORARY SOCIETY
SELECTS SIXTEEN UNDER-
GRADUATES
At the annual election of Sigma Xi,
national honorary scientific society,
Thursday afternoon, 42 were chosen
.to membership. Election to this so-
ciety is based primarily on research
ability. The following were elected:
Four from Faculty
Faculty-Edwin D. Baker, instructor
in chemical engineering; Paul Beav-
en, instructor in pediatrics; Adeline E.
Gurd, instructor in psychiatry; Clair
Upthegrove, assistant professor in
chemical engineering.
22 Grads Chosen
Graduates - Jeanette Armstrong,
physics; Ray V. Beshgetoor, electri-
cal engineering; Wilber Brotherton,
Jr., botany; Wallace E. Cake, chem-
istry; Frieda Cobb, botany; Jean Paul
Cooley physies Robert Day ele
trical engineering; Wesley G. France,
chemistry; Roy Greenthal, medicine
and surgery; Charles H. Griffitts,
psychoology; Harry E. Hammond,
physics; Julia M. Hawkes, astronomy;
Carl D. La Rue, botany; Margaret S.
Pengelly, botany; Charles E. Sando,
botany; Ellen D. Schulz, botany; Er-
win 0. Scott, chemistry; George F.
Smith, chemistry; Philip W. Shepard,
chemical engineering; Earl G. Sturde-
vant, chemistry; Adolph F. Wendler,
chemical engineering; Elmer H. Wirth,
pharmacy.,
Sixteen Undergrads Elected
Undergraduates-David G. Bovee,
mechanical engineering; Clarence
B. Campbell, mechanical engineering;
Casimir A. Domzalski, medicine and
surgery; Roy W. Elliott, civil engi-
neering; Harold E. Gladhill, chemis-
try; Wesley C. Huff, electrical engi-
(Continued on Page Six)
FROSH ENGINEERS'
DANCE SUCCESS
"Ike' played his best, the girls look-
ed their prettiest, and the punch was
"right there" at the Freshman Step
last night at the Armory.
The large crowd formed a block E
led by Claude A. Van Patten and Tes-
abel Worden of the University School
of Music. A picture was taken of the
dancers just as the final strains of the
'Victors"were sounded by the seven
piece orchestra.
Instead of giving large fancy pro-
grams the committee prepared small
programs and gave all the women
pounded silver dorraine cases. "Just
he dearest things." The programs
were silver grey and the dances were
numbered with the inscriptions of the
engineering honorary societies.
The question that arose before the
dance as to whether the men should
dear white flannels or not was decid-
d by the appearance of both the flan-
els and the "just decided to come at
he last minute" style.
"Pure if nothing else" was the gov-
rning maxim that presided near the
)unch bowl who did nothing else but
wash glasses.

PROMPT START IS NESSECARY
BECAUSE OF TRACK
MEET
CONTEST WILL BE HELD
AT 1:30 IN AFTERNOON
Teams Remain Unchanged and Rules
Are Same for Match; Captains
to Lead Men
The tug-of-war will be held at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon over the river
near the Wall street bridge.
Heavy rain yesterday caused the
postponement. It was undecided by
the Spring games committee up till
2:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon but
at that time a quickening of the down
pour resulted in the dicision that it
would be practically impossible to
stage the contest that day.
The underclassmen will meet this
afternoon at 12:45 o'clock. Freshmen
will assemble at the flag pole and
sophomores at Waterman gymnasium.
At 1 o'clock under the leadership of
their captains the teams will march
to the river where a revolver shot will
start the first pull at 1:30 o'clock.
The teams will be the same as an-
nounced and the same rules will be
followed.
The contests will begin promptly on
time so that all may be run off before
the track meet ,starts.
Late Wire Briefs

CLASSES '21 AND '22 CLASH
STRENUOUS FIELD
EVENTS
ENTHUSIASM AROUSEDJ
BY CLASS MEETIN
Freshmen to Meet at Flagpole
Sophomores to Gather at
Tappan Hall
Relay races, the cane spree, and
bag rush, to be held on Ferry field
morning, will decide whether the e
of '21 or the class of '22 is the m+
powerful.
Pep meetings with lively speal
have put real fight into the und
classes and each class is expected
turn out to a man in a mighty ef
to prove that it is the finest that.e
'graced the campus of Michigan.
'3 Fehestf
One of the speakers at the- sop
more meeting said that the class
'22 was the "freshest" he had .w
-seen and that every man of that cl
needed a thorough trimming with
the. fixings. Th. sophomores bell
him and are "out for blood." The i
year men, judging from the turn-
at their meeting, will not necessa
be on the defensive and their lead
are confident that the sophs will
"wiped off the map."
Classes Meet at 9:15
At 9:15 the freshmen will meet
the flag-pole and the sophomores v
gather at Tappan hall. Every m
will then be tinted with his resj
tive color and, under the leadershi,
their captains, the armies will ma
at 9:30 to Ferry field:
The winning of the cane s,
counts one point, the relay 1
points, the bag contest three and
tug-of-war three points. The class
curing the most of the nine pointsa
have justly earned the title pt"chs
Captains AuaaouneedC
A. O. Cuthbert is captain ofsopl
mores in the bag rush and he will
assisted by Usher, Shields, LAur
Kirby, Paislee, C. Wilson, Riva
West, Sanderson, and Calcord. '
sophomore entrees for the cane sp
will be announced at the field.
F. T. Czysz will captain the Tre
men in the bag rush. His lieutena
Are: Steketee, Dunne, Vick, E. W
son, A. H. Mesner, F. E. Moersh,
E. Hamilton, W. K. Rindge, and Bi
ton. The freshmen cane-spree conte
ants are as follows:
Freshmen
F. Czysz, G. Gilmore, J. Barnes,
E. Hamilton, H. E. Wilson, K. RI
kin, R. D. Rogers, L. H. Gunsbu
F. Steketee, E. G. Bradley, H. Se1.
C. E. Carlson, D. D. Brittson, H.
Waha, G. M. Cameron, H. Akers,
S. Ellerthorpe, R. Dunne, M. Bai
and M. D. Moersh.

(By Associated Press)
Montreal, May 16. - What the po-
lice say was intended to be a daylight
million dollar holdup of two Montreal
banks was frustrated today when
three men heavily armed were arrest-
ed in a Mfotor car near the financial
in~suttins 'he money had been d6-
posited as part of the payroll of the
Canadian Pacific Railroad.
(By Associated Press)
New York, May 16. - Julius H.
Barnes, federal wheat director, late to-
day formally notified L. F. Jates, pres-
ident of the Chicago Board of Trade,
that the exchange should re-instate
the rule limiting the amount of open
trades in corn for any one interest or
individual to 200,000 bushels. His sug-
gestion was designed to prevent undue
speculation.
(By Associated Press)
Copenhagen, May 16.-Petrograd is
expected to be occupied within a few
days by a strong Finnish army com-
manded by General Mannerheim, lead-
er of the government forces, according
to advices to the national Tidende.
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 16.--President Wilson's
message to be read at the approach-
ing session of Congress will consist
of approximately 3,000 words: It is
being sent forward to Washington to-
night. The message deals entirely
with domestic questions, and some
space in it is devoted to woman suf-
frage.
MENORAH SOCIETY
TO HEAR ADDRESS
Prof. Simon Litman, professor of ec-
onomics at the University of Illinois,
will address the Menorah society at 8
o'clock Sunday evening in Lane hall
on the subject of "The Jew in Art and
Science."
Professor Litman is a graduate of
the Universities of Petrograd, Paris,
Munich and Zurich. . He has taught
at the Universities of Paris and Cali-
fornia, and since 1908, at the Univer-
sity of Illinois. He is the author of+
several books on economic subjects
and a frequent subscriber to economic
and other journals.I
A prominent feature of Professor
Litman's address will be an open dis-1
cussion which will follow it.I

GERMANS HINDER CAMPAIGN
IN RIGA AGAINST BOLSHK'
Hun Maneuversw in Lithuai,
Reds, Says "1 Temps"
Correspondent
Paris, May 16.-- The German
their imperialistic maneuvers in
via and Lithuania are retarding
concerted campaign against the
sheviki in the region of Riga
.southward accQrding to the War
correspondent of "Le Tempa,",Frt
newspaper.
The effect of the coup at L
where the Germans overturned
Lett government, he says, has para
ed the anti-Bolshevik activity of
Letts and prolonged the domina
of Riga by the Soviet forces. LetY
politically and militarily under the
fluence of the Germans.
The presence of German troops
German agents in Lithuania, it is
ed, is holding up Polish military
tivity against the Bolsheviki.
The correspondent urges the ne
sity of compelling the withdrawa
the German troops as soon as pc
ble, asserting that there is no mili
reason for their presence.

FESTIVAL SUNDAY
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
A Gounod Program
"JERUSALEM"-Miss West and Chorus
"SANCTUS"-Mr. Hamilton and Chorus
"OH, DIVINE REDEEMER"-Mr. ,Dieterle
Sermon-lecture by Lloyd C. Douglas
"THE CULT OF THE SECOND BEST"

General Pershing to Visit London CITY BATHING BEACH BEING
Paris, May 16.-General Pershing, ENLARGED FOR BIG CROW
according to plans announced today,
will leave Paris on May 22 on his trip The Ann Arbor municipal bath
to London, where he will be the guest beach is being enlarged in order
of the British government and will re- take care of all swimmers. WI
view American and British troops. The completed the beach's capacity will
general and his party will return by doubled. An instructor' will be p
way of Brussels, where a big celebra- vided for those who wish to learn
tion will be held May 29. General swim. It is expected that both swi
Pershing will then go by auto to the ming and diving contestawill be h
large American battle cemeteries at during the summer. Four hundi
Beaumont and Ronagne to attend serv- lockers are being constructed .
ices on Memorial Day. 1suits and towels may be rented.

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