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May 15, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1919.

...r..... -__ -r .

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
,00 Sophomores weigh in for tug-
if-war at Waterman gymnasium, un-
Al noon and from 4 to 6 o'clock in
he afternoon.
0-Tryouts for skit in Banl Bounce
a room 205, Mason hail.
-Sophomore pep meeting in West
Physics lecture room.
0-Second May Festival concert in
Hill auditorium.
TOMORROW
0-Third May Festival concert in
ill auditorium.
0-Fourth May Festival concert in
Hill auditorium.
M0-Fresh lit Frolic In Barbour gym-
nasium.
0-Freshman engineer dance at the
Armory.
O-NOTICE S
y campus organizations or others
who have any editorial material for'
;he 1920 Michigan Handbook should
send it immediately to G. G. Whit-
iey editor, at Lane hall.
I junior engineers are urged to pay
:heir class dues as soon as possible
o the class treasurer, that their ac-
counts may be settled- before Coin-
nencement time.
phomore lits can pay their dues to-
lay from 8 to 4 o'clock in University
.l
NNECT WITH THE CONNECTICUT
MUTUAL
fe Insurance Co., organized 1846. My
ucational course free to the right
aduate. Don't see me unless you
ink you are a salesman. J. Fred
Lwton, '11, General.Agent, 610 Far-
ell Building, Detroit.-Adv.

DOUGHBOYS RECEIVE BEST
MEDICAL AID IN GREAT WAR
(Continued from Page One)
tals are now in operation in this coun-
try. Since the armistice was signed,
111,000 were returned to America, 44,-
000 sick and wounded taking curative
work during March alone.
Greater Call for Reconstruction
Colonel Billings said that since re-
construction has been so successful in
the army, industry will demand it al-
so. "The industrial army," he went
on to say, 'will look to the govern-
ment for this work which should be
standardized with government assist-
ance in local districts. As hospitals
are built to restore disabled men and
women and not educate them after be-
ing restored, schools of rehabitation
should be established in connection
with hospitals for curative work. No
man should be permitted to go to a
soldiers' home to be cared for by the
government if he can be rehabilitated
so that he can engage in a useful oc-
cupation. By the same token, the state
should not be expected to place in its
lmhouses those civilians who, when
incapacitated, can be brought to a
state of usefulness again."
Surgeon-General Ireland has a son,
Paul Ireland, 120M, in the University.
Both father and son are members of
Alpha- Kappa Kappa fraternity.
G. W. HULBERT, '17, COACHES
DEBATING AT IOWA STATE

i
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Thursday
ONE DAY

I

SPECIAL

Men's 3'C

Quality

Unusual success- has been achieved
by George W. Hulbert, '17, in oratory
and debating work at the Iowa Statet
Agricultural college. Hulbert, who re-
ceived public speaking training under1
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, has been coach-;
ing the college teams in preparationr
for their dual debates with 'the Uni-;
versity of Kansas.
Upon being discharged from the
army in January, 1919, Hulbert re-
turned to his work at Ames, coaching
both the college teams to a victory
over Kansas.
Hulbert was active in debating, ora-
tory, and dramatic work while here in
the University. -
SCHOOLS MUST TEACH ALL
SUBJECTS IN ENGLISH
Speaking in behalf of the attempt
of the department of the interior to
obtain legislation for Americanization
in the forthcoming congress, Dr. P.
P. Claxton, commissioner of educa-
tion, recently stated that all private
and parochial schools must conform
to public school standards and teach
all subjects in English. He added that
this is not to discourage the use of
foreign -languages, but rather to com-
pletely Americanize foreigners through
the schools.
F. V. Thompson, superintendent of
schools of Boston, Mass., also advo-
cated the careful supervision, particu-
larly of those schools attended by im-
migrants and the industrial classes.
"Education," he said, "is a public mat-
ter, and should be carried on through
the co-operation of t he nation, the
state, and the community."
"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS"

Hosiery

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Paris, May 13.--The Austrian peace
delegation arrived at St. Germaine-
en-Laye this evening.
The delegation was met by Prefect
Chaliel and representatives of the
French government and the allied and
gassosEn gine ers
gation was headed by Karl Renner,
the chancellor. Arm o
The first meeting with the Austrian
delegates presented a sharp contrast
to the first meeting with the German You w ill w ant
delegates because of its greater ease O il W
and friendliness.y
-- any upper classn
New York, May 13.-America's great
food relief program for the devastat- you should be c
ed countries of Europe will be prac-
tically completed in another six weeks, serge trousers---
according to a statement issued today
by the grain corporation, which the
statement says, will start its final $4.50 to $15.00
shipments across the Atlantic by the
middle or latter part of June.
At the four ports of Boston, New
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore
alone, 44 ships were loading today.
These shipments, with those whicht
will follow in the next six weeks, are E T LIBERTY
supposed to be sufficient to carry the 604 EAS
famine-stricken population of Europe
over until the next harvest.
NOMINATIONS BEING MADE FOR CHICAO PROFESSOR TALKS
ORATORICAL CONTROL BOARD ON QUESTION OF POLAND
New Constitution for Management of (Continued from Page One)
Campus Oratorical Affairs Poland, the political over riding the
Accepted common people."
"The patriotism in Poland is better
Nominations for members of the new than in any other state I know of. It
oratorical board in control of campus is something divine. A Pole feels his
oratorical activities are being made duty and obligation to his country,
this week and names of nominees will when he is living in another state and
appear the latter part of the week. is bound by his patriotism to protect
These names are to be voted upon and support his country at all times.
at the All-campus election. Even his children and grandchildren
Due to the recent reorganization of have the same regard to their state of
the University Oratorical association, extraction."
a new constitution for the body was While the past governing body in
necessary. At a meeting held -last Poland has tried to make every person
week Prof. R. D. T. Hollister read the a distinct individual, as property of
proposed constitution article by arti- the state, and do away with all united
cle. Following a few slight changes bodies except the government; the
the document was voted upon and ac- professor thinks that the holding of
cepted. the people by religion has done much
According to the newly adopted to keep up a united spriit which aft-
plan, campus oratorical affairs will be er a century will have developed into
managed by a new oratorical board one of the greatest states in all Eu-,
composed of 20 members. Of this rope.
number four are officers of the or-
ganization, eight are to be elected from Hohenzollern Statues Removed
the campus at large, four are to be
appointed from the four campus ora- Berlin, May 14. - Marble busts,
torical societies, and the other two paintings, lithographs and chromos
representatives are the financial man- calculated to keep green the memories
agers, Prof. I. D. T. Hollister, and of the dethroned Hohenzollerns are
the inter-collegiate contest director, to be removed from public administra-
Mr. R. K. Immel. tion buildings, schools and other offi-
cial premises in Berlin as a result of
CIVILIAN FORCES NOW STAN) a resolution adopted by the munici-
GUARD AT CAMP CUSTER pal council.
Camp Custer, Battle Creek, May 14.
-Camp Custer is having a hard time SPA L DIN G 'S
getting used to civilians doing guard
duty after seeing the camp patrolled Qo, For Shoes
by men in uniform since the day it Caps,Belts
was opened. It is a novelty to see FADFoot Ball
the men in "cits" covering their beat W o Equipment
and others in "its" perched in towers AD Sweaters
watching for fires and marauders. Jerseys
But it all will help the plan for dis- And the implements for every
charging more men, and those in the athletic game, of course.
service for the period of the emergency A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
are not laughing at the innovation. 211-217 So. State St.
Reserve officers who desire to be- CHICAGO, ILL.
come regulars will hereafter face
a new board, which will examine them
as to fitness and then, if approvings
the candidates, pass them on for theirA D
regular tests. This board will elim-
start. emsedd'lpedl

ALLEGED BRIBERY AT CAMP
DODGE INVOLVES FIVE
Des Moines, May 14.-Five persons W e had the
were indicted on charges of conspir- mcritical
acy and bribery by the United States
grand jury yesterday for an alleged c r i t i c s i n
attempt to gain a monopoly in govern-
ment supplies at Camp Dodge. m ind when
Michael Levy and S. D. Brill, of Chi-
cago, representatives of Michael Tau- w e m a d e
ber Co., St. Paul, are accused of offer-
ing $1,000 to Capt. L. E. Sinner, salv- Dixon's El-
chief, to fix it so they could gets
$39,000 worth of supplies for $12,500. dorado.
Arthur Kogrner, Washington; J.
Rhoade, broker, Norfolk, Va., and' A. c
Gross, Minneapolis business man, are
accused of trying to bribe Lieut. H. R. And it hasV
Vanstrum, Q. M. C., to get a purchase
of 30,500 government blankets. receiv edM
17-YEAR-OLD BOY CHARGED t h e ir u n - I
WITH THEFT OF DIAMONDS
New York, May 14.-Two boys were qualified ap-
arrested here last night, charged with oval.
the theft last Saturday of $100,000 in r
diamonds from Meyerwitz Brothers,
Broadway jewelry firm. Police claim
to have found all the missing jewels-
at the home of one of them.
Bertrand Maron, alias Bertrand 1/ I t n
Burgess, 17-year-old messenger, was
charged with the theft and Solomon at all stationers
Green, a friend of Maron, is charged

RL

LCOLM

ST.

COR. MAYNARD

( RAGE .MAK E. U.S.PAT. Orr.
MBEN'S SHOES
of Special Merit
/ -
Our Stocks complete
No necessity of misfitting
The limit of value at any stated price
We especially invite comparison of. our $9.50 and $10.00 B3rown calf
and Cordovan Oxfords. Every pair gua±ranteed satisfactory.

i°I

MAY16

Lits.
Barbour Gym

to look just as speck and span as
nan dare be and in order to be so,
lad in one of our white flannel or
We have your size ranging from
---if you come in at once

FROLIC

4 airs for $1.0
A full assortment of
the wanted s p-r i n g
shades.
White
Black
Navy
Gray
Tan
Palm Beach
Toes and Heels so
made as to defy wear.
All sizes
4 Pair for $1.00
F. W.Gross
309 South Main Street

We Feature 1"t

Walk

- Over Boot Shop

115 S. MAIN ST.

4

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Rosa Ponsolle
(May Festival Star)
RECORDS

Tosti's Good Bye

COUSINS & HALL

II

La Forza Del Destino
Madame Butterfly
(Un eildi vedremo)
Keep the Home Fires
Burning

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Kirschbaum Clothes
FOR STYLE
FOR QUALITY
FOR VALUE

Members Florists Telegraph Delivery

DO NOT FAIL TO HAVE THEM PLAYED
On Sale at

01,19

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Aliniendinger Music
122 E. LIBERTY ST.

Shop

PuPmps
For Warm
Weather
We are carrying these
special pumps in black,
brown and white.

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'['. IL C 22 gTs A
ND D ...
9 N6PC

$5.00, $6.00, $'7.00

Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new lint. of
PARIS FASHIONS
Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses
Newest materials, newest models, newest colorings, ana
lowest prices
7-1-

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1Tahr' S

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108 S. MAIN

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