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May 15, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-15

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VOL. XXIX. No. 159.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1919.

PRICE THREE (

EN FORCING TR EATY
MEANS ECONOMIC
RUIN OF GERMANY
COUNCIL OF FOUR REPLIES TO
GERMAN NOTES ON
PEACE
YANKEE TROOPS READY
TO EVACUATE GERMANY
Ten Units to Be Left in Occupation
Districts Till Arrival of
French
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 13.-The answers of the
council of four to the German notes
on prisoners of war and labor sub-
jects were delivered this afternoon.
One of the later German notes deal-
ing with economic clauses of the
treaty declares that they mean the
ruin of Germany if they are enforced.
Protest on Territory
A note on- territorial questions pro-
tests against the Saar Valley arrange-
ment and the transfer of the Malmedy,
Moresnet and Rupen districts to Bel-
gium, as well as the forced evacuation
of part of Schleswig.
The note on reparations does not
protest against the payment by Ger-
many for the devastation wrought in
Belgium and northern France by
which it says Germany is ready to do
willingly. It is added that Germany
will not make reparation for this dam-
age on the grounds that she was re-
sponsible for the war.
Return of Prisoners
The note on the question of pris-]
oners says:
"The peace delegation notes with
satisfaction that the congress recog-
nizes the principle of the return of
prisoners of war and civilians with the
least possible delay. The delegation
deems that the details of the execu-
tion of this measure ought to be sub-
mitted to special commission.,
"Directoral discussions between the
commission and nearly all the bellig-
erents concerning prisoners of war
have been considered, even during hos-
tilities as the surest means of solving
the difficulties. Today it ought to be
all the easier to reconcile the differ-
ent viewpoints and clear. up certain
obscurities still existing on certain
details of the problem."
Coblez, May 14.-If the Germans
sign the peace terms, all the American
troops, except the Third Corps, three
divisions, and a few headquarter units
will be out of the occupation district
of Germany by June 1, or soon after
that date, according to reports in cir-
culation in Coblenz.
Three Divisions
It is understood that the first, sec-
ond, and third regular divisions will
be those to remain for the duties in
connection with turning over the area
to French control. The length of time
required to turn affairs over to the
French is estimated at a month.
If the Germans do not accept, the
plans for the withdrawal of the Amer-
icans, will, of course, be changed ma-
terially. General Pershing, when ask-
ed what would be the first action of
the American troops in event the Ger-
mans did not sign the treaty, said it
pay be depended on that America will
do their part, whatever it may be.

Im ediate Movement
plans have been so prepared that
on the German signing of the treaty
the movement of troops will begin im-
mediately, eight train loads leaving
daily. The equipment for the soldiers
will be shipped later.
CURRICULUM PETITION DUE
All students who desire to en-
ter in their next semester upon
the combined curricula in letters
and medicine or law must
today file with the regis-
trar, upon a blank to be obtain-
ed from him, a, petition to beI
granted that privilege. Today is
the last opportunity a student.
has to receive this privilege,
ARTHUR G. HALL,
I Registrar. I

MICHIGAMUA HOLDS
SECOND INITIATION
Michigamua held its second initia-
tion of the year last night in its Wig-
wam making Indians out of the follow-
ing seven palefaces:
Reed F. Bachman, '20.
Abe J. Cohn, '21L.
Dewey F. Fagerburg, '20.
D. K. Messner, '20.
Thomas F. McAllister, '2114.
Gilbert P. Schafer.
Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E
MOSCOW OBJECTIVE Of
S -R MCI ANCE

OPENING CONCERT OF 26TH ANNUAL
MAY FESTIVAL ATTENDED BY4,5OO1
AUDIENCE ISTHRILLED BY SINGING

SELECTION FROM WELL KNOWN1

"FAIR LAND OF
BE SUNG AS

FR EED OM"
OPENING

TO

"MADAME

BUTTERFLY"

SCORES BIG HIT

NUMBER

EAST

RUSSIAN MILITARY OPERA-
TIONS DELAYED BY
THAW

Paris, May 13. - Plans are being
made by the All-Racan government at
Omsk to begin an advance on Moscow,
Admiral Kolchak, the head of the gov-
ernment, declared in an interview with
the correspondent of the Petit Parisien.
In discussing the military situation in
Eastern Russia the admiral said:
"Owing to the thaw and the diffi-
culty of moving artillery, a lull pre-
vails, but the operations will be re-
sumed before long and we will try to
establish communications with Arch-
angel, and also with General Denekine
in the south.
"The advance in the direction of
Moscow will then begin. The capture
of Moscow is the supreme end, the
political aim. But we must reach the
purely strategic aim, which is the de-
struction of the Soviet army."
Admiral Kolchak said that the allies
would aid in the campaign by sending
armament, munitions and clothing to
the army of the Omsk government.
After the final vistory, the admiral
continued, a national assembly will
be called to which he will hand over
his authority.
Honor Of Poland
S till Unstained
"There would have been no modern
Prussia and therefore no war if Po-
land had taken in Western Prussia,
during the fifteenth century," said Dr.
Znaniecki, of the Chicago university,
in his lecture upon the "Evolution of
Poland" in the Natural Science audi-
torium Wednesday afternoon.
Because western Prussia was pro-
testant, the Polish king did not desire
to federate it, as he had done with
eastern Prussia and a few neighboring
states. During the entire development
of Poland between the fourteenth and
sixteenth centuries, not a war of con-
quest was waged, but by applying her
principle of federation she became the
most powerful state in central Europe.
Religious Troubles Interfere
"In order to, understand the phe-
nomenal development of Polish history
one must see that it was spontan-
eous," said Professor Znaniecki. One
of the chief causes that stopped the
development of Poland as a large state
was the religious troubles with other
countries, especially Rome. Because
Poland failed to incorporate Russia
and Prussia, she failed to be the lead-
ing power in central Europe, owing
to the development of the military
powers of both of these countries. The
Chicago professor is sorry for political
reasons that she failed to develop a'
military machine in time, but glad for
moral reasons that she failed to do
so, although she lost her place polit-
ically among the nations of Europe.
From the seventeenth century on Po-
land would have had to devote her
energy to a military regime instead
of an industrial one in order to keep
her place.
Professor Znaniecki believes that
the nobility of Poland was more re-
luctant in granting the common peo-
ple their political liberty than any
other upperclass in all Europe. Po-
land was the only state in Europe
which did not lose its free corpora-
tions.
Nobility Had Upper Hand
The nobility or political booty at the
beginning of this war, however, was
much different than that of the seven-
teenth century, as the professor stat-
ed. The important offices of the gov-
ernment were either In the hands of
a Prussian, Russian or Jap. "This,"
he said, "made two distinct bodies in'
(Continued on Par ix

APPLAUSE WON BY
MISS ROSA PONSELLE
Chleago Symphony Orchestra Adds to
Pleasing Execution of All
Numbers
(By Edna Lucking Apel)
Under the baton of Frederick Stock,
the opening of the second quarter-
century of the existence of the May
Festival was celebrated by 4,500 peo-
ple singing "The Star Spangled fan-
ner" accompanied by the Chicago
Symphony orchestra and the Frieze
memorial organ.
Enthusiasm ran high throughout the
program, especially in the numbers
furnished by Rosa Ponselle, the young
23-year-old Italian soprano who made
her debut in Ann Arbor last night.
Miss Ponselle has a dramatic so-
prano voice unusual in lyric qualities
she shows remarkable technical finish
and displays exceptional talent when
it is remembered that she received but
five months training before entering
grand opera last November. She sang
on an even level throughout the pro-
gram and no chest tones could be de-
tected when she changed registers.
Her phrasing was excellent due to the
perfect breath control. In French,
Italian, and English numbers, her en-
unciation was exceptionally distinct.
Voice Never Falters
In the aria, "One Fine Day," from
Puccini's "Madame Butterfly," Miss
Ponselle conveyed the longing and the
hopefulness that the lover would re-
turn by sympathetic pathos of tone
and facial expressions, and the ease
with which she took the difficult B-flat
vowel merited genuine praise. Her
voice spanned contralto tones with the
highest soprano, and loud fortissimos
with whispered pianoissimos.
In the "Suicido," from "La Giocon-
da," her dramatic ability was evidenc-
ed and the fact that this is Miss Pon-
selle's favorite aria is no doubt large-
ly responsible for her colorful inter-
pretation.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra
had no small share in the success of
the program. The orchestra is larg-
er than it was last year and seems
to show a greater degree of excel-
lence, if that were possible.
Orchestra Has Difficult umber
The big orchestral number on the
program was Chausson's "Symphony
in B-flat." This work is permeated
with beautiful themes. In the first
movement there are several complete
and contrasting sections. Great skill
was exhibited by Mr. Stock in the great
emotional passages and the climax.
In the second movement, there are
so many transformations of the lead-
ing subject as to make repetition nec-
essary, which serves to strengthen the
appeal of the coda.
The great audience was noticeably
pleased with Lalo's "Norwegian Rhap-
sody." There are two distinct divi-
sions in this number. In the first, the
strings announce the theme which ends
with a further development by the first
violins against a background of chords
by the harp and remaining strings.
In the second part, the trumpets sound
the subject fortissimo, and the move-
ment is brought to an end as it be-
gan with abrupt trumpeting.
Mr. Stock's Composition Rendered
An appropriate climax to the even-
ing's program was furnished by Mr.
Stock's own composition "March and
Hymn to Democracy," a significant
Work typifying the serious and tragic
along with the spirit of unending hope
and implicit faith in the ultimate re-
generation of humanity. All the re-
sources of the orchestra were employ-
ed in the presentation of this work,
and the audience was sent away with

a greater realization of the achieve-
cents of Victory and Democracy.
Rosa Ponselle, whose rendition of
the arias from "Aida" elicited great
applause from the audience in - Hill
auditorium last night, was initiated in-
to the Mu Phi Epsilon, national mus-
ical society, immediately after the
concert.

NEXT YEAR'S WOMEN
LEADERS ELECTED
At the election of thecommittees to
care for the women's activities on the
campus next year, held at 4:30 o'clock
Wednesday in Barbour gymnasium, the
following were elected:
Junior elections: Social committee
-Roberta Dean, Kathryn Glass, Lucy
Huffman, Gretchen Jones. Senior play
committee-Laura Peacock, Sue Ver-
hinden, Rose Sturmer. 'Judiciary
council nominations--Ruth Abbott
and Sue Verhinden.
Sophomore class--Judiciary council
nominations: Alice Hinkson and
Dorothy Dunlap. Junior girls' play
committee: Lois Defries, Gladys
Reincke, Alice Combasy, and Helen
Masters. Social committee-Beatrice
Beckam, Joan McGinnis, Bessie Rob-
erts, Phyllis Wiley, and Quinette
Summers.
TRANSTLANTIC FLYERS
WILL LEAVE TODAY9

ROBERT DIETER LE, 018,
WILL SING TONIGHT
Noted Artists Will Render Hadley's
"Ode to Music"; Choral Parts
Intricate
Prof. A. A. Stanley has set to music
the Rev. F. Denison's hymnus,-entitl-
ed "Fair Land of Fredom," which will
be sung as a patriotic introduction to
the program of the second May Fes-
tival concert at 8 o'clock this even-
ing in Hill auditorium by the Choral
union.
The soprano solos will be sung by
Miss Lois Johnston, of Detroit, and
Robert Dieterle, '18, will take the bar-
itone parts. Both of these soloists are
pupils of Mr. Theodore Harrison, head
of the vocal department of the Uni-
versity School of Music. The hymnus
is intended to express the sentiment
of democracy in America and is a tri-
bute to victory.
Henry Hadley's "Ode to Music" is a
work that makes excessive demands
on the choral forces. The work is di-
vided into 10 main sections, each il-
lustrating some phase of music's pow-
er of expression, and so arranged in
sequence as to lead to an irresistable
climax at the end. The soloists will
be Miss Lois Johnston, soprano; Mme.
Merle Alcock, contralto; Mr. Arthur
Hackett, tenor; Robert Dieterle, bar-
iton, and Mr. Gustaf Holmquist, bass.
All of these artists are American ex-
cept Mr. Holmquist, who was born in
Norway.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra
conducted by Frederick Stock will ac-
company the Choral union and artists.
Frolic Open To
Upperclassmen
Upperclassmen have been invited to
attend the Frosh Frolic this year,
which will be held Friday night in
Barbour gymnasium. Fifty tickets are
now on sale at the Michigan Union
desk at $2.20 each.
Detroit's hest orchestra, which is
noted for its jazz music at the Pont-
chartrain, has been engaged for the
occasion. "Henry," the versatile vio-
linist, will lead the musicians
Garlands and festoonse have been
purchased by the decoration commit-
tee, who will transform Barbour gym-
nasium into a modern fairyland. The
general color scheme will be in green
and white. Ice cream, cake, and punch
will be served to the guests between
dance numbers. The entertainment
committee has also arranged for sev-
eral novel features.
The jazz orchestra will start the
function at 9 o'clock promptly. White
trousers and blue coats will be in
vogue for the men.
BAND CONCERT CANCELLED
DURING MAY FESTIVAL WEEK
Friday night's open air concert by
the Varsity band will not be given this
week due to the chance of a conflict
with the May Festival concert. Al-
though the band concert would prob-
ably be over before the time schedul-
ed for the Festival concert to begin,
Captain Wilson believes that the time
would be too short between the events.
It is possible that the band will play
for the track meet to be held Sat-
urday on Ferry field.
Regular weekly rehearsal was held
Wednesday night at the University
School of Music, and plans are being
formulated for the Band Bounce, to
be held May 27. As the band, which
numbers 60 men, is to form a large

part of the entertainment, Captain
Wilson is working hard to round his
men into the best possible form.
Internationally Known Writer Dies
Pittsburg, May 14.-Emile Swens-
sen, internationally noted consulting
engineer and writer on technical sub-
jects, died at his home here last night,
following a naralytic stroke.

MAY

GIVE

'22 MASS MEETII
GREAT SUCCEI!
CAPTAINS CHO!

SNAKE DANCE AFTERWA
TO AROUSE SPIRIT OF
CLASS

SEND NAVY DIRIGIBLE IN
ATTEMPT TO
CROSS

(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 13. - The Amer-
ican naval seaplanes NC-1 and NC-3
probably will be in flight before sun-
down tomorrow in the first attempt
to cross the Atlantic ocean through
the air. Official reports to the Navy
department from Trepessay Bay, the
starting point of the proposed flight,
intimated that the hop-off would be
made within 24 hours, as favorable
weather along the route to the Azores
was indicated.
The navy dirigible C-5 may also at-
tempt the long trans-ocean trip either
tomorrow or next day. Rising from
Montauk Point, Long Island, early to-
day the big airship had passed Halifax
before sunset and is expected to reach
St. Johns, Newfoundland, before day-
light tomorrow. A decision as to the
transatlantic attempt will be made im-
mediately on the recepits of her com-
mander's reports on his arrival.
The third seaplane of the transat-
lantic division, the NC-4, held up by
engine trouble on the first leg of the
journey, caught up most of her lost
distance today by covering the 340
miles from Chatham, Mass., to Halifax
plane will proceed to Trepessay Bay
in three hours and 41 minutes. The
tomorrow.
liest ?Iedical Aid
For Doughboys
"American soldiers were protected
from disease in this war better than
they, or the soldiers of any other
army, have ever been protected in any
war," stated Surgeon-General Merritt
Weber Ireland in his talk on "Results
of the Work of the Medical Profes-
sion During the War," given at 4
o'clock Wednesday in the West Physics
amphitheater.
During June, 1917, 32,000 medical
men were commissioned, which neces-
sarily caused a great shortage' of doc-
tors. Nearly all of military age en-
listed in the very beginning of the
war, which speaks well for the pa-
triotism of the medical profession.
Only 196 American soldiers died from
typhoid fever although they were lo-
cated in a part of Germany where the
disease was prevalent since the armis-
tice. There are now in France only
about 40,000, and 50,000 in this coun-
try, which means the beginning of the
end of the work of the medical corps.
Universities Aid
General Ireland said it was due
largely to the students of the univer-
sities that America did not make the
mistake of England and Franc.e in al-
lowing their young men to leave their
courses in school to enter the almy,
as if the war had continued, there
would be greater need of skilled doc-
tors than there was.
Col. Frank Bilhinger, of the sur-
geon-general's staff, then spoke on the
physical reconstruction work the gov-
ernment is doing. "Physical recon-
struction is one of the "most impor-
tant branches of work learned by the
medical profession during the war.
Heretofore the only means known for
salvaging the lives of soldiers was by
surgery, the removal of parts of the
anatomy instead of the rebuilding of
it. Forty-four reconstruction hospi-
(Continned on Pa r

SOPHOMORES TO HOLD
MEETING TONIGHT
Enthusiasm Displayed Gives Proble
of Real Battles When Games
Begin
Filling the auditorium in the Physics
building to far more 'than its capaci-
ty, the freshman class took active steps
in the annual spring games, last
night, when they elected officers for
their part in the contest, and listen-
ed to the final announcements con
cerning the affair.
With the final arrangements being
completed, Carl T. Hogan, '20E, an-
nounced yesterday just how the affair
would be conducted this year. The
tug-of-war to be held Friday after-
noon is scheduled to begin promptly at
3:30 o'clock near the Wall street
bridge at the river. The other games
will be held Saturday morning be-
ginning at 10 o'clock.
Classes to Be Excused
No classes are to be held for fresh-
men or sophomores after 3 o'clock
Friday afternoon, nor will any be held
for these classes Saturday piorning,
according to announcements issued by
the deans of both the engineering and
1,iterary colleges.
At 3:30 o'clock the wearers of the'
gray toques will gather at the flag
pole on the campus, while the sopho-
mores will use the gymnasu" as their
starting point. They will then march
to the field of battle.
Saturday morning the sophomores
will meet at Tappan hall at 9:30
o'clock and ,the first year men will
gather at the flag pole again. From
here they will march to Ferry field.
Sophomores Meet Tonight
The sophomore pep meeting will be
held at 7 o'clock this evening in the
Physics building, where Carl T. Ho-
gan, '20E, will address them an the
technique of the games. Paddle Lam-
bert, former Varsity football star, and
Jim McClintock, basketball star, will
address them. Ralph E. Gault, '21L,
will preside at the meeting.
Sophomores are urged by the offi-
cials to be prompt in weighing In at
Waterman gymnasium this afternoon.
Hours have been announced as 10 to
12 a. m. and 4 to 6 p. m.
Election of captains and assistants
to lead the freshmen resulted last
night as follows: Bag Rush---zyss;
tug-of-war-Jordan; assistants in tuk-
of-war-heavy weights; Dow; middle
weights, Van Patten; light weights,
Kerwin. Relay lieutenants-Eads, Sis-
ler and, Miller.
Pat Smith, former captain of .the
Varsity football squad, and Aill For-
tune, "M" man, addressed the first
year men, explaining the games and
urging them to fight hard and square.
Snake Dance Staged
Following the mlass meeting of the
first year men, a mjonster snake dace
was staged. Starting from the phys-
ics building, it wound its way through
the campus, over State street, and even
through the Majestic theater. The
spirit of the first year men was evinc-
ed by the fact that they did not take
advantage of their run through the
picture house, and remain there, but
Instead, every man came out and con-
tinued the dance over the University
part of the city.
From present indications, the an-
nual inter-class event of this year
promises to be a huge success.

I

UNDERCLASSMEN EXCUSED
All underclassmen are excused
from classes at 3 o'clock Friday
afternoon, that they may partake
in the Spring games. There will
be no classes for freshmen .and
sophomores Saturday morning.
DEAN JOHN R. EFFINGER,
DEAN MORTIMER E. COOLEY.

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