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May 14, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-14

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A-4SOCIa >TED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE~
SERlVICE

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VOL XXIX. No. 158.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 1919.

PRICE THREE

HUNS THUNDER AT
TERMSTOO HARSH
CHANCELLOR'S SPEECH OF DE-
NUNCIATION CHEERED BY
ASSEMBLY
PACT UNACCEPTABLE,
STORMS SCHEIDEMANN
Says Document Would Make Enormous
Jail for 60,000,000
Germans
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 13. - The heads of the
two oGerman democratic parties and
the parties of the center have inform-
ed Chancellor Scheidem0.nn that their
parties will withdraw their represen-
tatives from the government in case
the cabinet decides to sign the peace
treaty, according to a dispatch from
Berlin received here by way of Basel.
'Berlin, May 13.-The declaration by
Chancellor Scheidemann in the na-
tional assembly Monday that the
peace terms were "unacceptable"
brought the members of the assembly
and spectators to their feet in a hur-
ricane of cheers and applause.
The chancellor reached the climax of
his statement on the peace terms 10
minutes after he began. He paused in
his address and then thundered out
the word which announced the German
government's rejection of the Ver-
sailles conditions.
'This treaty is in the view of the
imperial government unacceptable. I
aim unable to believe the earth could
bear such a document without a cry
issuing from millions and millions of
throats in all lands, without distinc-
tion of party. Away with this murder-
oIus scheme."
Assembly Cheers
With the exception of the Indepen-
dent Socialists led by Hugo Haase, all
factions in the assembly arose and
cheered lustily. The assembly Is sit-
ting temporarily in the assembly hall
of the University of Berlin.'
After the chancellor's speech the
leaders of the variou sparties, with the
exception of the Haase group, made
speeches in which they declared they
backed up the government.
"Murderous Document" '
The chancellor described the peace
treaty as "a dreadful murderous doc-
ument." He said it would make an
enormous Jail of Germany in which
60,000,000 persons would have to la-
bor for the victors in the war.
The chancellor said the German
trade would be strangled if the peace
terms were accepted.
He criticised President Wilson, ac-
cusing him of deceiving hopes of the
German people.
Triangles Take
Ten Sophomores
Triangles, junior engineer honorary
society, initiated 10 new members at a
banquet held Tuesday evening in the
Union.
At the dinner C. T. Hogan, 120E, wel-
comed the neophytes for whom W. B.
Weathers, '21E, responded. Other
speeches. were given by Robert Cook,
'20E, and Prof. F. H. Stevens. Donald
M. Springer, '19E, officiated as toast-
master.
The following sophomore engineers
were initiated: L. A. Gaines, R. F.
Grindley, W. B. Weathers, R. C. Losch,
W. R. Meese, D. A. Longenecker, R.
P. Dillon, A. J. Karpus, R. B. Marshall,
and H. G. McNamee

WHISKEY WILL BE SOLD TO
HIGHEST BIDDER IN TOLEDO
Toledo, May 13. - Uncle Sam will
auctioneer John Barleycorn tomorrow.
John's estate, consisting of 1,400 kegs,
-1,200 quarts and 2,400 half pints of
whiskey and 1,.00 quarts of gin will
be sold to the highest bidder. It rep-
resents booze confiscated from rum
runners operating across the Michigan
border from Toledo.

burning reezes
Scorch Initiates
Scorching were the breezes which
blew from afar up the Nile, among
the pyramids. Scorching were the
desert sands of the long trail leading
to the abode of the Sphinx. Along this
burning path toiled 10 weary neophy-
tes, praying that there might be rain
to bring them relief. For Sphinx, ju-
nior honorary society, took unto it-
self 10 sophomores Tuesday. Those
who survived the trials were:
John H-en ry, John E. MManis,
George Prather, Lawrence Butler,
Jack Williams, Henry Whiting, Stew-
art Baxter, Edward Usher, Walter
Wesbrook, and Fred Petty.
At the Mumification banuet at the
Union Carl Johnson, '20, David B.
Landis, '20, Lawrence Butler, '21, Har-
ry Carey, '20, and Prof. Jonathan A.
C. Hildner responded to Zips from the
Desert.
WOMEN FAIL TO TRY OUT
FOR lSENIOR GIRL'S PLAY
MORE NEEDED OR PRODUCTION
WILL BE GIVEN UP -
BRUMM
Due to the fact that only a small
minority of senior women tried out
for the Senior Girls' play, there will
be another try-out at 4:30 o'clock to-
day in Barbour gymnasium. In case no
more spirit is evidenced at this time
than at the last try-out, the director
and committee will be forced to give
up the production for lack of support,
and the 1913 senior class will be the
first not to produce a Senior Girls'
play.
Only 85 Appear
At the last try-out only 35 appear-
ed, and there are 35 characters. The
committee were dissatisfied with this
showing, for unless there is enough
talent displayed to pick, froc, the parts
will not be well filled, for the play
selected demand's that the characters
be well adapted to the roles, even
these who do not have speaking parts,
for the atmosphere and background
created by the minor characters is im-
portant in making the play a success.
Mr. Brumm, the director, said last
night, "There must be something lack-
ing inclass spirit, and there is no use
going ahead without the enthusiasm of
the class behind the play. There have
always been plenty of girls to try out
and it has been regarded as the best
play of the year, in regard to the tal-
ent shown, the audience, and the
charm of the outdoor setting.
Place Aside Aspiration
"There are minor parts to be filled,
and the spirit of the class should be
such that the girls will be willing to
put the class before personal aspira-
tion and accept minor though not less
important roles. The idea that the
parts had been prearranged bef*Te the
first try-out is a mistaken one, and a
number of people must be secured both
for speaking parts and for making up
the scenery. We cannot go ahead un-
less the class backs it up."
WEDNESDAY DEADLINE ON SALE
OF FRESHMAN STEP TICKETS
Absolutely no tickets for the first
annual Freshman Step to be given
by the frosh engineers Friday night
at the Armory will be sold after 6
o'clock Wednesday evening. Only 130
couples will be permitted to attend,
and most of the tickets have been sold
Fisher's orchestra will play. Deco-
rations have arrived from Toledo and
work on beautifying the hall will be-
gin soon.
VACCINATE MARTHA COOK
GIRLSAGAINST SMALLPOX
Dr. M. Eloise Walker and an assist-
ant nurse have been vaccinating the

girls of Martha Cook dormitory for
smallpox. This is done as a preventa-
tive of the spread of the disease, one
case having been found in theadormi-
tory. There is no danger of an epi-
demic in the building.
JACQUES COPEAU TO TALK ON
FRENCH REPERTORY MOVEMENT
Jacques Copeau will lecture in the
Natural Science auditorium Wednes-
day, May .21, at 4:15 p. m., about the
French repertory movement, of which
he is the most qualified representative.
He will also interpret some fragments
of classical as well as modern come-
dies and dramas.
HOMOEOP HOSPITAL RECEIVES
NEW OPERATING EQUIPMENT

OMU'OSIC FESTIVAL
OPENS TONIGHT AT
HILL AUDITORIUM
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
CHORAL UNION, AND ORGAN
PARTICIPATE
OPENING OVERTURE IS
FITTING INTRODUCTION

President Harry B. Hutchins Not
To Give Commencement Address

Dr. Frederick P. Keppel, Dean of
Columbia college, Columbia univer-
sity, will deliver the Commencement
address in place of President Harry
B. Hutchins, according to a statement
given out Tuesday.
Since Doctor Keppel took his degree
'at Columbia in 1898, he has been ac-
tively connected with that university,
and has been prominent in education-
al circles. In 1900 he became assist-
'ant secretary of Columbia college, in
1902 secretary, and in 1910 was ap-
pointed dean. In 1911. the French
honor of Chevalier d'Honneur was

conferred upon him.
When the United States entered the
war, Dr. Keppel became assistant to
the secretary of war, and in 1918 was
made assistant secretary of war,
which position he now holds.
Dr. Keppel will come to Ann Arbor
with a message to deliver to the grad-
uating class and the authorities con-
sider themselves fortunate to have se-
cured such a man to deliver the Com-
mencement address.
Dr. Keppel is a member of the Psi
Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa fraterni-
ties.

Russian Masterpiece Has For
Themes Bibical Account of
Resurrection

Its

The Choral union, the Chicago Sym-
phony orchestra, the audience, and the
Frieze memorial organ will participate
in the opening of the Victory May fes-
tival at 8 o'clock this evening in Hill
audtioriun
Rimsky-Korsakow's overture, "The
Russian Easter," is based upon two
verses from the Psalms and the ,New
Testament account of the ressurec-
tion. This is a fitting introduction to
a festival falling in with what is hoped
to be a new birth of political idealism
and freedom. From beginning to end
the pronounced individuality of the
composer is evidenced in this com-
position which will be played by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra conduct-
ed by Frederick Stock.
Ponselle Will Sing
"0 Patria Mia" from "Aida" is an
aria that is intensely dramatic. "Aida"
was written for the Khedive of Egypt
and its first performance was given in
1871 at Cairo. Miss Rost Ponselle will
sing the arias on the program.
Chaussor's symphony in B flat ex-
presses the serious in music, a char-
acteristic in which' Chausson excels.
In form it is orthodox and in content
it compares with modern ideals. This
symphony was completed in 1890 and
was given its first performance in
Paris the following year.
East and West Mix
"In the, story, of Madame Butterfly,"
the East and the West mingle with
but little glory for the latter. Butter-
fly's weary years of waiting for the
faithless lover, who gave his promise
that "he would return when robin red
breasts rebuild their nests," were
made possible by the comforting re-
flection that though "Here they have
built them thrice already, over there
I thought they might do so more rare-
ly." When his friend told her that the
lover had returned but with an Amer-
ican wife, poor Cho-Cho-San could find
no outlet for her despair but suicide.
Butterfly in this aria is confident that
her lover will return.
Labl Versatile
The "Norwegian Rhapsody" is an-
other proof of the versatility of Lalo's
composing. There are many sugges-
tions of the Northland in this number.
"Love Fly on Rosy Pinions," from
Il Trovatore, is a product of Verdi's
most brilliant period and has enjoyed
unusual popularity. This aria is tak-
en from Act IV and immediately pre-
cedes the famous "Misere."
Frederick Stock's "March and Hymn
to Democracy," will conclude the pro-
gram.
BEST ARCHITECT
WILL GET MEDAL
Prof. Emil Lorch has received a
letter from the secretary of the Amer-
ican Institution of Architects stating
that a gold medal will be awarded to
the student graduating this year with
the highest average during his four
years of work in the department of
architecture.,
Twelve other schools, in addition to
Michigan,, are recognized by the insti-
tution, 13 in all comprising the Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Schools of Arch-
itecture. The other recognized schools
are: the universities of Pennsylvania,
Illinois, California, Minnesota, Wash-
ington, St. Louis, Harvard, Columbia,
Cornell Syracuse and the Carnegie
and Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology.
STUDENTS WANTED FOR WORK
IN EVAPORATING LABORATORY
Students are wanted to work in the
evaporating laboratory of the Chemis-
try building until the end of the se-
mester. Experience in millwrighting
and pipefitting is desirable but not
necessary. Applicants must be able to
put in four consecutive hours each
day. Apply at room 206, Chemistry
building.
MISS SHAW OF LIBRARY GIVEN
SIX WEEKS LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Miss Bertha Shaw, who has been

at the periodical desk in the General
library, has been granted a leave of
absence of six weeks. Miss Shaw is at
presqm t testing in Ann Arbor.

ENTHUSIASM FOR FRESHMAN SUCCESS
IN GAMES WILL-BE AROUSED TONIGHT,

MOB RULE DISCOURAGED
In order to prevent the occur-
rence of any disorderly mob,
which in recent years has donef
so much to hurt the name of
Michigan and to lower it from
the plane of a great University,
the Student council asks that all
sophomores refrain from con-
gregating in any sort of gather-i
ing on the night assigned to the
freshmen for their pep meeting,
Wednesday, May 14.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL.
CONYETEO WAR POLICIES
INSURE AGINST DEATH
ENSIGN SORENSON URGES MEN TO
PAY ALL MONEY DUE ON
INSURANCE
"War risk insurance given by the
government is, like other insurance,
for protection, and not for invest-
ment," said Ensign C. S. Sorenson, of
the United States naval recruiting sta-
tion at Detroit, in his talk yesterday
to the University students interested
in the government's insurance plan.
"This war risk insurance," he said,
"gave protection against total perma-
nent disability and death while the
person was in active service, and now
it, or any .of the converted polcies,
affords the same protection. As soon
as the government sets the date, the
war risk insurance must be converted
within a period of five years therefrom
into one or more of the following pol-
icies: ordinary life, 20-year payment,
30-year endowment, 20-year endow-
ment, and endowment maturing at age
of 62."
Renew Policies, Urges Ensign
Any person who has let his pay-
ments lapse, may, according to Ensign
Sorenson, reinstate his policy. All of
the policies assure the same protec-
tion, and are free of conditions as to
residence, travel, occupation, military
or naval service. They are also incon-
testable from their date. The con-
verted policies will not have an in-
creasing rate premium, but will be
permanent insurance.
When the war risk insurance is con-
verted, no physical examination will be
required. The converted policy will
date from the time of its conversion
and the same protection and conditions
included.
U. S. Handles Insurance Entirely
"The government is going to handle
this insurance itself," Ensign Sorenson
concluded, "and will not turn it over
to private companies as some persons
believed."
Any'student desiring information
may secure such by writing to En-
sign Sorenson, Naval Recruiting Sta-
tion, Detroit, or by corresponding
with the government at Washington.
STUDENT COUNCIL NOTICES
ABSENCE OF SENIOR GOWNS
Resolution Passed Tuesday That Wear-
ing of Insignia Is Tradition
Worth Observing
Noticing that many seniors have not
been wearing their caps and gowns
lately on Wednesdays and Fridays, the
Student- council took action on the
:matter at its meeting Tuesday night
at the Union. That the wearing of
senior 'caps and gowns is a tradition
that should not be slighted was the
opinion of the council. A resolution
was passed to the effect that every se-
nior should do his part by wearing his
cap and-gown..

Three Juniors Secured to Instill Pe
Into Only First Year Assembly
Before Contests
TUG-OF-WAR SCHEDULED FOR
FRIDAY AT WALL ST. BRIDGE
To instill into every member of the
class of 1922 the fighting spirit nec-
essary for the success of the Spring
games, the Student council has called
a freshman meeting for 7 o'clock to-
night in the West Physics lecture
room. The sophomores will meet at
the same time and place Thursday
night.
Council Man Will Instruct
C. C. Smith, '20; W. P. Fortune, '20;
and D. K. Mirrielees, '20E,'are the pep
speakers who will talk to the fresh-
men. G. D. Anderson, '20, of the Stu-
dent council, will instruct the men in
the parts that they are to play in the
games. This will be the only en
'masse assembly of the freshmen be-
fore the tug-of-war Friday afternoon.
Carl T. Hogan, '20, Student council-
man in charge of the games, urges
that every freshman try out today in
Waterman gymnasium for the tugrof-
war and the relays. Members of the
council will be at the gymnasium to
attend the weighing in from 10 to 12
o'clock in the morning, and from 4 to
6 in the afternoon. The same sched-
ule and times apply for the sopho-
mores on Thursday.
First Contest at 3:30
At 3:15 o'clock Friday the freshmen
will meet at the flag-pole and the
sophomores will meet at the gymna-,
sium. The captains .of the respective
teams will then organize their men
and lead them at 3:30 o'clock to the
river for the tug-of-war. The contest
will take place at the usual spot near
the Wall street bridge. A flag tied on
the rope in mid-stream will aid the
judges in rendering a decision in the
event of a "dry" session.
About 20 prominent athletes and
well known campus men will be
chosen to act as judges in the games.
FROSH TO RENDER
CAP NIGHT CHORUS
Members of the class of '22 will give
the first rendition of their new Cap
night song at the Frosh Frolic Friday
evening in Barbour gymnasium. "Con-
way's Gang" will start the air and the
dancers will join in. The chorus will
be used later as a dance number.
The words of the song were written
by A. L. Steinberg, '22, and the music
by James Glover, '22.
Programs for the Frolic are entire-
ly new in design, symbolic of a bit of
freshman insignia. Tickets for the
dance are now on sale at the Union
for members of the freshman class. On
Thursday and Friday they will be
available for purchase by upperclass-
men.
CO-OPERATIVE BUYING AMONG
FRATERNITIES PROGRESSES
Considerable progress toward an
interfraternity co-operative buying
plan was achieved at a meeting of the
stewards at 7 o'clock Tuesday night in
the Union. All the representatives
present were enthusiastic about the
suggested scheme.
To complete thework started an-
other meeting will be held at 7 o'clock
next Tuesday night in the Union.
Cards will be sent to the presidents
of the fraternities in order that all
may be represented. It is expected that
active operation will start soon in or-
der that some saving may be made on
the fall supply of goods.
McALLISTER, '21, WITHDRAWS
NAME AS OFFICE CANDIDATE
To the Editor of The Michigan Daily:
Sir - I hereby withdraw my name
as a candidate for Law vice-president
of the Michigan Union.
THOMAS McALLISTER, '21L.

AP NIGHT ALUMNI
R EPRESENTATIVE I S
. K. WAINS '11
GRADUATE ACTIVE IN CAMPUS
WORK WHILE IN UNIVER-
SITY
PROF. BRUMM TO TALK
ON BEHALF OF FACULTY
McAllister, '21L, Chosen as Student
Representative; Usual Free Shows
Annonced
James K. Watkins, '11, one of Mich-
igan's prominent graduates of recent
years, is to represent the alumni on
the Cap night program. While in col-
lege Mr. Watkins was among the ac-
tive men on the campus and left be-
hind him an enviable record. Varsity
football man in '09, associate editor of
The Daily, president of the Union and
of the Student council are but a few
of the honors which he achieved while
here.
After graduation Mr. Watkins was
for some time probation officer in the
Juvenile courts in Detroit, where he
also practiced law. He enlisted in the
heavy artillery, in which he held the
rank of major in the A. E. F. OnI his
return to this country a few months
ago he resumed his practice in 'De-
troit. With a man of this caliber to
represent the alumni an excellent pro-
gram is expected.
Representing the faculty on the
same program will be Prof. John L.
Brumm. Those who have heard Pro-
fessor Brumm speak know that he is
always both entertaining and instruc-
tive at the same time. He is certain
to be a real representative of the fac-
ulty. Thomas F. McAllister, '21L, will
represent thestudents, and is sure to
put pep in his talk.
It is announced that, as usual, there
will be free shows for sophomores and
freshmen for Cap night.
HARD TO POINT OUT
BEST FRENCH RTIST
-LEBLANC.
"Almost all of the artists who are
represented in this collection are of
such undisputed merit that to point
out the leaders is a very dicult mat-
ter," said M. Ludovic Leblanc, of the
French High commission, in speak-
ing of the exposition of war paintings
that will last until Sunday evening in
Alumni Memorial hall.
Are Divided into Three Classes
Dividing them into three classes, M.
Leblanc expressed it as his opinion
that the best painters are: Adolphe
Thiers. Paul Roblin, Georges Michel,
Jodelet, the official painter with the
French army of occupation, Belnet,7
noted for his reiaarkable work in wa-'
ter-colors, Cha; esFouquerez, Andre
Devamberg, Jonas, Georges Brayer,
Charles de Lesseps, Jouve and Georges
Scott.,
Heconsiders the following the best
cartoonists: Ricardo Flores, who died
of wounds, Neumont, vice-president of
the French Society' of Humorists,
Jaques Nam, Herve Baille, Georges De-
.law, Hansi, Veber, A. M. Le Petit, and
Francisque Poulbot of Le Petit Par-
isien.
M. Leblanc believes khat the best
etchers and engravers who have pic-
tures in the collection are: Jean Jules
Dufour C. Hallo, Bernard Naudin, Paul
Loys Armand, and Pierre Bertrand.
Realism Betrays French
It can easily be seen that these
artists were all French soldiers, for
the action and realism of these are
very evident. The group of paintings

by Jules Roux, of which there -are
some 11, are probably the most color-
ful. His night scenes strike the lay-
man as most effective.
Georges Scott, of course, stands out
pre-eminently. His portrayal of the
Kaiser in 1914, "The Accursed," typi-
fies the vengeful feeling of Europe in
1914 against the relentless conqueror.
A Expect May Festival Sales
A number of the paintings have al-
ready been sold. It is expected that
the visitors who come for the May
Festival will purchase many. The pro-
ceeds will go either to the artists or
to their families.
SOPH LIT DUES ASKED
Sophomore lit dues will be
payable from 8 o'clock in the I
morning until 4 o'clock in the I
afternoon Thursday, In Univer- I
sity hall. All sophomores are I
I urged to pay the 25 cents I
I promptly.

CURRICULUM PETITION DUE
All students who desire to en-
ter in their next semester upon
the combined curricula in letters
and medicine or law must, be-
fore May 15, file with the regis-
trar, upon a blank to be obtain-
ed from him, a petition to be
granted that privilege.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.

Complete operating equipment has
f been received by the children's ward
of the Homoeopathic hospital, and is
now ready for installation. This will
be done as soon as the children who
I are now occupying the future operat-
. ing room can be disposed of.

E.

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