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October 03, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-03

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

-1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1918

PRICE THREE

0TH FOR
S BUYERS

NEWBERRY HALL WILL BE ADDI.
TIONAL RECRUITING
CENTER
STUDENT SUBSCRIPTION.
BELOW PROPER SHARE
Student Body to Be Canvassed i City
Fails to Attain Quota by
Saturday
A tent for use in recruiting volun-
teers for the Fourth Liberty loan will
be erected in a conspicuous place on
the campus today. The office in New-
berry hall also will be kept open.
The Liberty Loan is open for volun-
teers up to and including October 5.
During this time there will be no so-
licitation. All students who wish to
buy must do so at Newberry Hall ,or
at the tent. Their subscriptions will
not be accepted down town.
Subscriptions Are Low
Up to this time there have been but
45 subscriptions taken in the Univer-
sity, and the total amounts to but
$3,850. This is not nearly as much as
it should be, say the Loan officials.
If the city has not reached its quota
by Saturday, the student body will be
canvassed. None who have already
bought will be asked to subscribe,
therefore the office is keeping a care-
ful record of those who volunteer. The
greater share of the volunteers the
flrst day were men, but the women re-
deemed themselves the second day. No
faculty subscriptions will be taken at
the University office. The faculty
should subscribe at the down town of
fie.
Expect Total to Go Up
The subscriptions will undoubtedly
become heavier toward the end of the
week when the S. A. T. C. becomes
more definitely established. Men who
brought money for their tuition will
hand It over to the Liberty Loan when
they find they will not need it.
The first day of the Loan 22 people
subscribed and the amount was $1,250;
the second day eight subscribed and
the amount was $1,450; the third day
15 subscribed and the amount was..
$1,150. There is no record of the
amount the students subscrbed to the
First Liberty Loan for it was not kept
separate from the subscriptions of the
city, but In the Second the students
subscribed $135,000 and in the Third
$57,000. Now it is up to them to dou-
ble the qota, and those who failed
to subscribe before should particularly
realize their responsibility.
Following is a list of student volun-
teers: -
First Day
Russell A. Stevens, '21, Raymond K.
Corwin, '21, Warren F. Hill, '21, Seth
B. Slawson, '21, John R. Stewart, '21,
Earl W. Dunn, '20, Jeanette Arm-
strong, Grad., John H. Hills, W. Wal-
lace Muir, E. Clarke Gage, Oscar F.
Kerlin, '21, Paul W. Van Orden, Ern-
est F. Potter, '19E, John A. Hookey,
Clarence A. Maulthrop, Herbert E.
Neil, '19, Grant M. Bunting, '21E, Har-
ry E. Bleich, '21, Clarence F. Kessler,
'19E, Joe B. Bond, '21, G. Frederick
Holmbach. -
Second Day
Edna J. Gordon '19, Elizabeth Mc-
Donald, Grad., Evadue R. Wright, '19,
L. Mason Lyons '19M, Harriet Wood-
worth, '20, Mary E. Oakes, '20, Ivan,
Dansard, 21E, Frank H. Holmes, '21E.
Third Day
Marion Treadgold, '20, Lyman J.+
Ballard, '19E, Jas. C. J. Martin, '19,
Alfred S. Goorin, '20, Marion C. Wean,1
'21, Herbert A. Bronne, Adelia Mc-i
Orea, Harding L. Wilbur, Chas. R.;
Dsius, Jr., '20, Beryl M. Chynoweth,
'19, Harry A. Hamilton, '19D, Waldo1
I. Murphy, '20, John V. Wagar, '20,+
Robert D. Horn, and T. A. Belknap.I

NATIONS ESTABLISH
CENTRAL CONTROL
Washington, Oct. 2--=The long plan-
ned centralized control of all the eco-
nomic forces of the nations fighting
Germany is at last 'a fact. It applies
the principles of the unified mjlitary
command to raw materials, manufac-
tured products, shipping, finance, food,
and the exports and imports relations
of the United States and the cobellig-
erants.
The plan was worked out by Presi-
dent Wilson's so-called war cabinet
and the Allies missions. It has been
approved by the president and the
premiers of the Entente nations.
The program will be coordinated
with finance through the inter-Allied
finance commission; with shipping
through the inter-Allied councils; and
with export and import relations'
through an inter-Allied board made
up of heads or representatives of
American war trade board and simi-
lar departments of the war council.
Sr A., T. C, ORGANIZATION
MIKES RAPID PROEISS
MEN ARE ALREADY DRILLING;
EQUIPMENT IS ARRIVING 7
PRO31PTLY
Complete mobilization of the S. A.-
T. C. at the University is rapidly be-
ing completed. A staff of stenograph-
ers and clerks are carrying on the
work of classifying and assigning the
new soldiers to their respective com-i
panies and barracks. The men havel
already commenced to study the rudi-
ments of close order formation.
The equipment for the unit is al-
ready arriving. A carload of 1,000t
Russian rifles arrived yesterday which
will afford a nucleus for instructing
the men in the manual of arms. Cots
and blanketsare still needed, but the
temporary deficiency is being met by
the use of fraternity house equipment.
A revised program for the men was
issued from headquarters yesterday
by Captain Ralph H. Durkee. The
schedule extends from 6:15 o'clock in1
the morning, when the first call is=
sounded, until taps at 10 o'clock at
night. Inspection takes place at 10:30
o'clock Saturday morning.f
Releases for the men in the organ-
ization from the local draft boards
are coming in quite rapidly. By thet
end of the week the work of classify-
ing, assigning men to their barracks'
and giving them minor instructions
will be finished.

STUDENT BODY FREE
FROMINFLUENZA
Ten Ann Arbor Men and Two Women
Are Only Local Victins
So Far
DISEASE NOT FEARED HERE
DUE TO GOOD CONDITIONS
Origin of Malady, Its Symptoms and
Prevention Are Explained by
Authorities
No cases of epidemic influenza had
been reported among the students of
the University up to noon Tuesday, ac-
cording to Dr. W. E. Forsythe, execu-
tive head of the University health ser-
vice. Of the twelve cases of residents
in Ann Arbor, ten are men and two are
women. Their ages range from 20 to
40 years. Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health
officer of Ann Arbor, states that this
present epidemic is nothing but the
common influenza, sometimes called
"la grippe." He says the disease is
not dangerous in itself, but that it oft-
en turns into a more serious ailment,
namely, pneumonia.
Origin of Malady
The malady broke out in Spain last.
May and then spread to Germany.'
About the middle of the summer many
cases were reported among the Allied
nations in Europe. Great precautions1
were taken and towards the latter
part of July the disease was almost
eradicated. About a month ago a ship1
load of soldiers who were infected with
the communicable disease, landed at
the port of Boston. Shortly afterward'
it broke out in the cantonments of
Boston. As these cantonments were
very much over-crowded, the malady
spread rapidly. The impetus was greatj
and within a week all the eastern
cantonments reported thousands of'
cases. The close association of the
men in the camps formed a rich soil
for its propagation. The army physic-
ians say that the disease has almost
run its course.
Symptoms and Prevention 1
Dr. H. W. Emerson of the Medical'
school of the University, says that the
symptoms of this influenza are those
of a cold with more marked irrita-
tion of the mucous membrane of the
nose, mouth, and throat. Anyone hav-
ing a cough or a cold should be very'
careful about not spreading it to oth-
ers. The person having a severe cold
should stay at home, and better still,
in bed. A handkerchief should be held
to the mouth when coughing or sneez-
ing. An early treatment is very de-#
sirable. One should avoid others hav-
ing such symptoms. Every preventitive
possible must be made use of. As the1
present epidemic of influenza is simply
a form of or an extension of colds, one
is advised to consult a physician im-
mediately when the first indications of
the symptoms are perceptible.
Don't Fear Disease
Since the conditions in and about
the University are considered excel-
lent, physicians agree that even though+
some cases may be reportedsthe dis-
ease will not spread here as it has
in the army cantonments. Housing
facilities and quarters are especially1
favorable for its prevention. The min-
ute any member of the students' army
training corps is reported to have in-E
fluenza, the barracks in which he isa
rooming will be nut under quarantine.1
With care and watchfulness the phy-
sicians of the University expect to
keep the number of cases within the
minimum.

BUNDESRAT REJECTS MOTION
FOR VOCATIONAL SUFFRAGE
Amsterdam, Oct. 2.-Berlin advices
received here say that the Prussian#
upper house has rejected the motion to
introduce suffrage based on vocations
and passed an equal direct suffrage
measure in accordance with the gov-
ernment bill, with the addition of an
extra vote for placing over 50 years
of age.

100 YANKEES ESCAPE
GERMAN PITFALL
British Headquarters in France, Oct.
2.-(By Reuters.)- A contingent of
Americans who have been holding out
since Sunday in a far advanced posi-
tion between Carnbrai and St. Quentin,
against greatly superior enemy num-
bers, has been rescued.
In our attacks around Vendhulle
yesterday we were able to fight
through and relieve this party, num-
bering 100, who had taken up their
positions Sunday night and were sur-
rounded by the Germans early Mon-
day. Notwithstandingthat they were
opposed by superior numbers and only
possessed ammunition and food which
they themselves were carrying the
Americans made a magnificient resist-
ance and the ground was strewn with
German dead.
ROOMING HOUSES HRD
HIT; MANY FOR. RENT

IMEN

GO INTO BARRACKS
LEAVE THEIR QAURTERS
UNTENANTED

TURKEY ATTEMPTS PEACE PACT WITH
ALLIES THROUGH FINANCIAL GHANNELS
CZECHS DISCGARD AUS TIAN PRO POSI

AND

Rooms are more plentiful; in Ann
Arbor this year than ever before in
the history of the University. Rents
have dropped considerably because of
the depleted ranks of room seekers.
The result is tragic to a number of
landladies who have been deriving
their entire revenue from the rental
of their rooms, and a large number
have been forced to close their houses
and move, some even out of the city.
Others have rented parts of their
houses. Those fortunate enough to be
located near the campus have fared
much better than the owners of houses
two or three blocks from the Univer-
sity. Some houses which face the
campus have been filled, but these
cases are comparatively few.
Many Vacant Houses
Vacant houses within a two-blocks
circle from the campus number be-
tween 25 and 30 and the "For Rent"
signs grow more numerous in the
more remote districts. Some landladies
have solved the war-time problem by
changing their houses to girls' resi-
dences, but the decreased number of
girls has made this plan only partially
satisfactory.
The boarding houses have been af-
fected in some degree, but the larger
ones are still filled to capacity. Quick
lunch restaurants and serve-selfs are
crowded daily. A number of the small-
er boarding houses closed their doors
permanently this year.
Prices of food have been raised and
the cost of board has followed suit.
Boarding house rates have been in-
creased about 20 per cent. The dif-
ficulty in getting waiters has been
greater this year than formerly. Con-
ditions will probably remain the same
until after the war.
LESS INFLUENZA
IN ARMY CAMPS
Washington, Oct. 2. - While reports
to the office of the surgeon general,
of the army showed decreases in the
number of new cases of Spanish influ-
enza at armycamps, information com-
ing to the public health service was
that the disease was rapidly spreading
among the civilian population over the
country.
The malady has now appeared in
43 states and is particularly preva-
lent along the Atlantic sea board and
the Pacific coast. Steps have been
taken against the disease by the pub-
lic health service.
The number of cases in army
camps during the 24 hours ending at
noon today was slightly more tha;
13,000, a decrease of 1,000 from the
total reported the day before. Pneu-
monia also showed a decrease of 876
new cases and 271 deaths. Influenza
cases in all camps now number more
than 100,000.

Women Offered
3 Food Courses
At the request of the United States
food administration, three food cours-
es are being given in the University
this year. These courses are practi-
cally the same as those given last
year.
The first course, "Food and the
War," is a general survey of the
world's food problem in its geograph-
ic, economic, and nutritional aspects.
It will comprise a study of the effect
of the war upon the food and
the need of food control and con-
servation. This course is primarily for
juniors and seniors.
The second course deals with the
fundamentals of food and nutrition in
relation to the war. It will be a con-
tinuation of the first course but with
greater emphasis on its nutritional
aspects and their relation to natonial
and individual food conservation.
The third is a laboratory course in
use and conservation of foods and
must be taken in connection with
course one or two.
Each of these courses gives one
hour credit.
NATIONAL DEFENSE COUNCIL
FORMS NEW FIELD DIVISION
Washington, Oct, 2. - The. new
Field Division of the Council of Na-
tional Defense, incorporating the
work of the state section and the
woman's committee, and intended as
the link between the council and the
people, has begun operations. Secre-
tary Lane, as chairman, explained
that the purpose of the division is to
arouse the nation's energies toward
work by moving through state coun-
cils and subsidiary orkanizations.
Americanization and child conserva-
tion will form two of the six -com-
mittees of the new division.
FREDERICK A. STOCK LEAVES
ORCHESTRA TO BECOME CITIZEN
Chicago, Oct. 2. - Frederick A.
Stock, conductor of the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra, voluntarily resigned
yesterday for the period necessary to
be made a citizen. That is the result
of a government investigation against
members of the orchestra. Mr. Stock
disclaimed all sympathy with Germany
and blamed himself with laxity for
failing to take out second citizenship
papers. Eric de Lamarter, composer
d~r Mr o i rn lif in nta A.

HUNS REACH HINDENBERG LINE1
BRITISH CAPTURE 7,000
TURKS
ENTENTE RECOGNIZE
ARABS IN PALESTINI
Belgians Force Teutons to Emaeual
North Sea Coast Towns; Brit-
ish Take Roulers
(By the Associated Press)
London, Oct. 2.-Turkey has mad
further indirect approaches to the A
lies through financial channels whic
are being considered by the Britis
war cabinet, the Standard says :
learned on good authority. Importan
developments, the newspaper adds, ar
expected.
Czecko-Slovaks Reject Offer
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct. 2.- Czecko-Slavi
leaders have sharply rejected an offe
made to them to enter an Austria
coalition cabinet, according to a Vi
enna dispatch.
(By the Associated Press)
London, Oct. 2.--The Allied goveri
ments have decided formerly to recog
nize the belligerant status of the Ara
forces fighting as auxiliaries with th
Allies against the common enemy i:
Palestine and Syria.
German Retreat Continues
(By the Associated Press)
Again the Germans are In retrea
on an inmportant sector of the west
ern front in France. The scene of ,
new retrograde movement is a wid
front north and south of La Basse
canal.
A continuation of the Entente's al
lied forces in their brilliant achieve
ments in restoring Belgium, Flanders
and 1he expulsion of the enemy fron
further territory in France from th
region of Cambrai to Verdun evidentl
has brought the Germans to the real
ization that a great bend in the lin
from Menin to the east of Arras i
likely to prove another such trap a
was the St. Mihiel salient unless the
are fast enough of foot to move easi
ward, giving up Lille, Lens, and Doua
and straighten their line from the vi
inity of Cambrai to Belgium.
On all the other six battle front
from Belgium to Verdun the Entent
forces are keeping up their success
ful advance, although the German
everywhere, except northwest <
Rheims, have materially stiffened thei
front and are offering strong resis
ance.

THOUROU T REACHED
IIN NORTHERN DRIVE
With the British Army in France,
Oct. 2. - Again there has been brisk
fighting both in the regions north and
south of Cambrai and in Flanders.
The Belgians and British in the
north have made progress in the di-
rection of Thourout, and reports have
reached headquarters that this town
has actually been reached.
Heavy mud resulting from the re-
cent rainy weather has somewhat
slowed up the movement, but in spite
of the difficulties the Belgians and
British have pushed their way for-
ward bit by bit.
The Australians south of Cambrai in
hard fighting gained considerable
ground today, but more important
than the extent of territory is the fact
that they took positions which would
have been of much importance to the
Germans for future operations.
Patrols have penetrated further into
burning Cambrai. Generally speaking
the battle today has not been pro-
gressing with the same vigor as re-
cently, inevitable causes here and
there failing to give the impression
of the lack of speed to the move-
ment.

an former journanst, succeeds Mr. AleThatnOed
JStock. . UV~~.LL1 Alies Threaten Ostend
Stock.
In Belgium and Flanders the wedge
COTTON MANUFACTURERS WANT of Belgian, British, and French troops
has penetrated still farther eastwarc
ALIENS ADMITTED FOR LABOR and southeastward from Dixmude and
only a few miles more will be requir-
Boston, Oct. 2. - Suspension of ed by the Allied troops to give them
rigid immigration laws to permit con- positions by which Ostend, one of
tinuance of quantity production of Germany's sea bases, will be made un-
cotton goods was advocated by the tenable, and indeed the entire north?
labor committee of the National As- sea coast now in German hands put in
sociation of Cotton Manufacturers jeopardy.

yesterday. The manufacturers claim
that if government and civilian needs
are to be met the labor supply must
be maintained through admission of
aliens during the war.
Three Year- Term for Sleeping -
Rantoul, Ill., Oct. 2. - Frank P.
Murray of Titusville, Pa., a private in
the Two Hundred and Eighty-eighth
aerial squadron, has been sentenced to
three years at hard labor in Fort
Leavenworth, Kas., it was announced
at the Chanute aviation field today
Murray was found guilty of going to
sleep while in charge of two prison-
ers.

Many additional towns have been
captured by the Allies in this region
and numerous prisoners have been
taken. The important railroad junction
point of Roulers is all but in the
hands of the Allies, while southward
from Roulers the British have cut the
Roulers-Menin railway at two places
and are investing Menin.
Americans and French Advance
The French are now in full posses-
sion of St. Quentin and have passed on
eastward. The entire Hindenberg
system between St. Quentin and le
Catelet has been completely smashed
by Field Marshal Haig's forces with
whom the Americans are brigaded.

ARUSO -and Four Other Great

Concerts

JASON

TICKETS

ON

SALE

AT

HILL

AUDITORIUM

FICE, SATURDAY, OCTOBER

5,

8 A. M.-$4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.0(

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