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May 09, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-09

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A 410.
THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
__ iDan

:43 ttl

ASOCIATED
PRESS
DAYT LND NIGHIT WIR

VOL. XXIX. No. 154. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

HUNS TO REJECT
ESTRICTER CLU SES
ASSERTSZEITUNG
BERLIN PAPER SAYS GERMANY
WILL REFUSE THROTTLING
CLAUSES
SENATORS ATTACK AND
SUPPORT PEACE TREATY
Oppose Proposal of America's Going
to Aid of France in Case
of Attack
Pekin, May 6 (delayed). - Nation-
al sentiment has been aroused in Pe-
kin and throughout China over the
peace conference decision on Shan-
tung .and Kiao Chow. The press is
united in demanding- that the terri-
tory be returned unfettered to China.
Parliament today adopted a resolu-
tion addressed to the peace confer-
ence, deprecating the decision to give
the disputed territory temporarily to
Japan. A boycott of Japanese goods
is much discussed in official circles
here:
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, May 8.-The National Zei-
tung today publishes what it terms.
the official standpoint the government
expects to take regarding the peace
terms.
The government, according Ito the
newspaper, will refuse to sign any
point of the treaty which provides for
"oppression of Germany." For In-
stance, the Entente's attitude regard-
ing Danzig and the Saar valley will
not be accepted. The German dele-
gates, however, will make every ef-
fort to institute negotiations on these
and all other unacceptable demands.
Washington, May 8.-As they com-
pleted their study of the official sum-
mary of the Treaty of Versailles to-
day, senators began to give expres-
sion to their views on the momentous
document which is now in the hands
bf the German plenipotentiaries. A
. w, hoever, ystill withbeld com-4
ment, preferring to examine the com-
plete text before reaching a definite
conclusion. These included Senators
Lodge of Massachusetts, Smoot of
Utah, and other Republican leaders.
Sharp opposition to the proposal
that the United States, in concert
with Great Britain, commit ittelf to
go to France's aid in the event that
country were attacked, was voiced by
Senators Borah of Idaho and Curtiss
of Kaasas, while Senators Sherman of
Illinois and Moses of New Hamp-
shire criticized the League of Nations'
covenant in the treaty.
treaty Approved
Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska, re-
tiring chairman of the Senate for-
eign relations commiittee, approved
the treaty as a whole, and said that
in his judgment "the crowning glory
of this great document is that there
is embodied in it the great constitu-
tion of the League of Nations." The
senator declared the treaty was "a
monumental work," and measured up
"to the highest moral standards of
the world" with justice as the basis
of reorganization.
Disarmament Thorough
General approval of the military
and naval terms imposed on Germany
was given not only' by both Republican
and Democratic senators, but by offi-
cials and diplomats generally. They
concurred in the view of army and
navy officers that, with the carrying
qlt of the terms, Germany would be
stripped of every vestige of power
pecessary for it to disturb again the
peace of the world.
ENTERTAINERS WANTED

Tryouts for the position of
special entertainers who will be
taken on the trips, are wanted
by the Varsity Glee and Man-
dlin club. Any high class orig-
inal act will be acceptable. Can-
didates are requested to report
to room 328 in the Natural Sci-
euce building between 2 and 4 1
o'clock on Friday or Saturday. I
I. -|I

CANDIDATES NAMED
FOR PUBLICATIONS
At a meeting of the managing edi-
tors and business managers of the
student publications the following
men were nominated for student
members of the Board in Control of
Student Publications: -
HaroldMakinson, '21M; Earl Cress,
'20; Joseph V. Tracy, '20E; Burton
A. Garlinghouse, '20; William M. Le-
Fevre, '19-'23M; David B. Landis, '20;
Ralph E. Gault, '21L; Karl H. Velde,
'20; and Cecil C. Andrews, '20L.
From this list three men will be
elected at the All-campus election
May 22.1
HIGH .SCHOOL SYSTEMS
SUBJECT OF MEETING
ENGLISH METHODS ADVOCATED
BEFORE SCHOOLMASTERS
CLUB
The effectiveness of the English seg-
regation system in our high schools
was the ,main point emphasized by
'Edwin L. Miller, principal of the De-
troit Northwestrn High school, in his
talk Thursday night before the School-
masters' club at the Union. (
Speaking to the advanced students
of the educational department of the
Uniyersity, he brought out the ad-
vantages of this system of teaching
over the former grade system where
'the students are arranged according
to their class.
Mr. David T. McKenzie, principal of
the Detroit Central High school, in-
troduced the system six years ago,
having obtained the idea from his
study of the English segregation
plan. The Yale preparatory school,
Lawrenceville, has been using the
system with good results.
Girls and Boys Separated
Under this plan the girls and the
boys are taught in separate rooms
called houses. In a large school
there would be three or four houses
for girls and the same number for
boys. Student government is carried
on by the students of these houses, the
pupils electing their ovn officers and
naming their house, generally after
some famous man. During the course
of four years, a room master, or grade
principal, as he is called in Detroit
from the old system, becomes very
familiar with the individual and his
parents.
The system of athletics may be car-
ried out on a very large scale under
this plan both for the boys and girls.
House competition takes place not
-only in sports but in debating and the
like.
Boys Improve
Principal Miller has found, by keep-
ing a close record upon the scholar-
ships during the past few years, that
the average of the boys in the mixed
classes when compared to that of
the girls is as one to two. But in the
segregated 'classes, where the boys
feel free to talk, theiraverage in-
creases about 32 per cent while that
of the girls tends to drop in compar-
ison.
LIEUT. ROVILLAIN
BACK FROM ARMY
"With the United States and Great
Britain pledging allegiance to France,
under an agreement with the League
of Nations to aid . her in case of an
unprovoked attack by Germany, one
of the greatest desires of the French
people has been achieved," stated
Lieut. Eugene E. Rovillain, former in-
structor of French in the University
and recently discharged from active
service in the Army of France.

Lieutenant Rovillain sailed from the
United States last June to enlist in
the French army and from the time
,of his enlistment was assigned in the
capacity of technical interpreter . at
the great arsenal of Puteaux.
Students who were in Mr. Rovil-
lain's classes last year will have an
opportunity to hear a few of his opin-
ions on the great war and on the peace
terms this afternoon at 4 o'elocl( in
room 200 University hall.

MASQUES PRESENT
QALITY STREET55
WITH SUCCESS
GORNETZKY'S ORCHESTRA PLAYS
ACCOMPANIMENT; GIRLS'
GLEE CLUB SINGS
WOMEN BRING OUT PLOT
INTRIQUE WITH S K I LL
Attractive Scenes and Quaint Schemes
of Decorating Give Atmuosphere
of Eighteenth Century
"Quality Street," the quaint English
play of the eighteenth century by
J. M. Barrie, was presented by Mas-
ques with high skill and art last night
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Bar-
rie's mannerisms and humorous style
were executed with a finish that was
commendable for the amateur cast of
girls and their director, Prof. J. R.
Nelson.
Mary Overman, '19, as Phoebe Thros-
sal, was the precise, piquant leading
lady who tried to be courageous
through the long Napoleonic wars and
support herself by keeping a "genteel
school." She played her part well and
portrayed a typical English type.
Hero Ardor Well Done
Mildred Reindel, '19, took her role as
Capt. Velintine Brown with a mas-
culine dash and was a truly noble
hero. Upon finding his sweetheart
Phoebe, changed into a prim school-
mistress his ardor wanes. The prim
Phoebe resolves to win his love by im-
personating an imaginary niece and
dons a youthful dress and coiffure.
He becomes infatuated with her anew
a'nd still loves her when he finds
that she is his real Phoebe all the
time.
Winifred Parsons, '19, as the sister
of Phoebe played a strong part in the
well-ordered houshold. Helen Os-
band, '19, Hilda Hagerty, '19, and Fyme
Bodenstab, '19, as three maiden ladies,
were true to their roles and enlivened
the play.
Scenery and Music Pleasing
The scenery was perhaps the best
ever used in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. All the settings were so studied
as to give the stage a larger aspect
and was successfully accomplished. A.
J. Gornetsky, '19L, with his orchestra,
furnished music throughout the play
and in accompaniment for the program
of the Girls' Glee club given between
acts. Several children, students in the
genteel school, danced and took their
juvenile parts in good form.
Masques will present "Quality
Street" again Friday night at 8 o'clock
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
SENIORS MUST PAY
FEES THIS MONTH
Diploma fees in all qf the colleges
and schools of the University are now
payable and the blanks to be filled out
when such payments are made may
now be obtained from the secretary in
that college or school in which the stu-
dent is enrolled. These fees, which
amount to $10 each, must be Paid dur-
ing the month of May.
Those students receiving business
adminstration certificates or teacher's
diplomas are requested to pay the $2
fee at the same time they pay the one
for graduation. Every settlement is
necessary for the preparation of diplo-
mas, and in no case will the Univer-
sity confer a degree at Commence-
ment upon any student who fails to
pay this diploma fee.
In case the faculty does not recom-
mend any payor, the fee will be re-
funded on surrender of the receipt for
payment. These conditions also apply
to thosereceiving other diplomas. The
candidate for degree or diploma should

at once fill out the card obtainable at
the office of the secretary of their col-
lege or school, pay the treasurer of
the University and have card receipt-
ed, and then file indicated section of
this receipted card with the secretary
again,
Iowa Considers Daily Exercise
Daily physical exercise for every
student in the University of Iowa was
discussed at a meeting of 114 repre-
sentative men and women of that uni-
versity.

CONSOLIDATE RAILROADS INTO 12 TO 20
COMPANIES, URGES DIRECTOR-GENERAL

(By Associated Press)
New York, May 8.-Compulsory con-
solidation of all the railroads of the
country, weak and strong, into 12 to
20 large competitive systems, private-
ly owned but operated under "thor-
ough-going government ' regulation,"
was urged here tonight by Walker D.
Hines, director general of railroads,
as a solution of the railroad problem.
Speaking before the Economic club,
Mr. Hines declared that, unless some
cure as radical as the - one proposed

was adopted, post-war regulation
would prove even more disappoint-
ing than the thoroughly unsatisfactory
pre-war regulation.
Coupled with his proposal for com-
pulsory consolidation of the strong
and weak roads into great systems of
relatively equal earning powers, Mr.
Hines urged that the new systems be
officially appraised and capitalized so
that earnings sufficient to attract new
capital into the field would be guaran-
teed by the government.

TWO NAVY PLANES
LAND AT HALIFAX,
FIRST OBJECTIVE
NC-1 AND 1C-3 ARRIVE SAFELY
COMPLETING FIRST LEG
OF FLIGHT

NO

WORD

FROM NC-4;
OR TROUBLE

HAVING MOT

FIRST CONCERT OF
BAND TONIGHT
Campus Custom to be Followed To-
night with Playing From Stand;
Perhaps Every Week
SENIORS MAY SING AT SAME
TIME IN CAPS AND GOWNS
Weather permitting, the first open
air concert of the year will be given
by the Varsity band at 7 o'clock Fri-
day night from the campus band stand.
It is possible that the seniors in
their caps and gowns will give their
annual sing at the same time, for it
is a custom which has been carried out
in past years. The seniors and the
band will -alternate in singing and
playing and at times both will render
campus tunes together.
Michigan songs such as "The Vic-
tors," "Varsity," and other familiar
tunes will constitute the principal
part of the program. Popular music
with a few marches, and light operas
will form the remainder of the enter-
tainment. No effort will be made to
render the more difficult musical pieces
as will be done later in the year.
For some time the band has been
planning on playing from the campus
stand but inclement weather and con-
flict with other student activities has
caused the postponement of the initial
concert. This is planned to be d week-
ly affair if conditions are favorable.
The concert Friday evening will be-
gin promptly at 7 o'clock and will be
about an hour In length,

CHINESE FORESTS
WORK OF HAN, '1d

1

MANY PLANS LAID
FOR FIELD D A

Y1

- Steak, barbecued in the old fashion-
ed way over a fire of glowing coals,
will head the menu for the annual
Field Day of the Forestry club, to be
held Saturday, May 10, at the Saginaw
forest farm,
A baseball game to be held in the
forenoon will act as an appetizer. The
rival teams will be chosen from mem-
bers of the club. The main events of
the day are trap shooting, rifle and
pistol contests, talks by members of
the forestry fagulty and exhibits in
breaking camp and packing, will be
eld in the afternoon.
"The more the merrier," is to be
the slogan of the day, it having been
decided by the committee to make
the event open to all. To cover ex-
penses a charge of 50 cents will be
made for the barbecue. A small
additional fee will be charged for each
of the contests. Those desiring to
enter the shooting contests are re-
quested to bring their own ammuni-
tion as. only a limited amount will be
taken out by the committee.
SOPH ENGINEERS TO CHOOSE
COUNCILMEN AND CAPTAINS
Nominations for the Student coun-
cilmen and election of athletic cap-
tains will take place at the meeting
of the sophomore engineering class
at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon in room
348 of the Engineering building. This
is an important meeting and every
one is urged to be present.
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHINS
COMMENDS CAPS AND GOWNS
"I am in favor of the wearing of
the caps and gowns after the swing-
out on the days designated. The cus-
tom is one to be commended and I
hope that the seniors will carry it
out' "President Harry B. Hutchins
said in an interview yesterday.

Chaotic Condition of Government Stops
Completion of Forestry Grad's
Extension Plans
YEARS IN AMERICAN COLLEGES
IN PREPARATION FOR PROJECT
If the great waste plains of China,
once covered with the most luxuriant
growth in the world but now deso-
late unused lands, are ever restored
to their former state, it will mark
the accomplishment of the work inaug-
urated by Ngan Han, of the 1911 for-
estry class of the University of Mich-
igan.
China is, at present, without for-
ests. Wood is a luxury that can be
afforded only by the rich, the poor
living an unsanitary life in dirty hov-
els constructed of mud and stone.
Stories are told of wooden wheel-
barrows being treasured and handed
down from generation to generation
because of the great value of the ma-
terial from which they were made.
Timber of every description must be
imported, and due to its excessive cost,
the progress of the nation has been
held in check.
In Charge of Work
Fully realizing the deplorable condi-
-tions, Han determined to devote his
.life to the establishing of a forestry
system in his native . land. Securing
his degree at Cornell, he came to
Michigan in 1909, entered the Forestry
department and was graduated in
1911. Completing his preparations
with a year's work in agriculture at
Wisconsin university, he returned to
China where he was put - in charge
of the Department of Agriculture and
Commerce.
For a time the work progressed
rapidly. Government forests were es-
tablished in the province of Manchuria
and Han was sent to the Philippines
to make a further study of the for-
ests there as a possible source of sup-
ply.
Han Not Supported
China, however, was not sufficiently
advanced to appreciate and support
such advances. The government was
in a chaotic condition and appropria-
tions to support the work were not
forthcoming. No more forests were
established and even the areas al-
ready planted were not cared for.
When the proper time arrives, and
China becomes sufficiently advanced
to carry out the work, it is reason-
able to believe that great progress
will be made. The land that once
had a growth of forest second to none
in the world still retains much of its
former fertility, and with only one-
fourth of the territory being used for
agriculture, space can easily be al-
lotted to the project. The time may
be so far in advance that Han will no
longer be able to head the movement,
but to him belongs the credit for its
inaugeration.
NOTRE DAME GAME
PREVENTED BY RAIN
(Special to The Daily)
South Bend, Ind., May 8. - Rain
prevented the playing of the Michigan
Notre Dame baseball game schedul-
ed for this afternoon. The two teams
were both on the field and were just
through with the batting practice
when an especially hard. downpour
made the staging of the game im-
possible.
The Michigan team leaves in the
morning for Lafayette, Ind., to play
Purdue.-

Destroyers Searching for Disabled
Aircraft Along Atlantic
Coast
(By Associated Press)
Halifax, May 8.-Two of the Amer-
ican navy seaplanes, the NC-1 and the
NC-3 arrived here at 8 o'clock to-
night (7 o'clock New York time), thus
finishing successfully the first leg of
thier trans-Atlantic flight.
The two planes were sighted first at
7:44 o'clock. The NC-3 took the water
at eastern passage at 7:55 o'clock.
and the NC-1 10 minutes later. No
repo ts have been received of the
NC-4, which developed trouble with
one of the engines not long after leav-
ing Rockaway.
The seaplanes left the government's
station at Rockaway Beach at 10
o'clock this morning. The distance to
Halifax is 540 miles.
New York, May 8.-The naval com-
munications service announced tonight
that the last direct word of the navy
seaplane NC-4 was received at 2:33
o'clock while she was limping along on
three motors off Otter Cliffs, Maine,
headed for H alifax. Two destroyers
are searching for her along the coast.
The crews of the three planes were:
NC-3-Commander H. C. Richardson,
Lieut. D. H. McCullough, Lieut. Com.
R. A. Lavender, Machinist L. R. Moore,
and Lieut. B. Rhodes.
NC-4-Lieut. E. F. Stone, Lieut. W.
Hinton, Ensign H. C. Rodd, Chief Me-
chanics Mate Rhodes and Lieut. J. L.
Breese, Jr.
NC-1-Lieut. Com. M. A. Mitscher,
Lieut. T. L. Barin, ^Lieut. H. Saden-
water, Chief Machinists Mate C. .
Kesler and Machinist R. Christensen
FRENCH WAR PANTINGSNUH 1 1EI
Oil paintings, water colors, crayon
sketches, original lithographs, and
pen and ink drawings are all to be
found in a remarkable variety of col-
ors and tones at the exposition of
French war pictures which will open
at 7:30 o'clock Friday evening in the
large gallery and lecture room of
Alumni Memorial hall.
The colection has been brought to
the United States by M. Ludovic Le-
blanc, delegate of the French high
commission. Every one of the pic-
tures is for sale and the proceeds will
go to either the soldier-artists or their
families. The prices range all the way
from $10 up to several thousand.
The aim of the paintings is to give
a clear idea of those myriad little in-
cidents of modern warfare that wonId
be forgotten if not set down for all
time by the pens and brushes of real
soldiers. Their subjects cover a wide
range of ground: night attacks lighted .
8y the flare of star-shells, scenes in
the front-line trenches, a poiu com-
ing upon the body of a murdered child
in a ruined homestead, cartoons of the
kaiser and his minions, life in the hos-
pitals and among the wounded, Russ-
ian prisoners, American soldiers,
ruined cathedrals, and many others.
A number of these paintings are the
work of artists famous long before the
war while others have earned their
reputations since war was declared.
The works of the greater artists have
been placed in groups in the installa-
tion of the collection. At one end of
the gallery are a large number of
smaller water colors and lithographs.
Monsieur Leblanc will lecture at 8
o'clock Friday night. The opening
night will be open only to members of
the Ann Arbor Art association but any-
one may become a member at the door
by paying 50 cents.

--- - ----- - 7

TONIGHT
at 8 o'clock
Sarah Caswell

uali.ty

Street

MASQUES presents
its annual play
Open to both Men
and Women
Admission 50c

A FOVR-ACT COMEDY BY J. M. BARRIE

Angell Hall.

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