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May 08, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-08

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THE WEATHER
CONTINUED FAIR;
t ~WARNER

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY .AD NIGHT WIME
SEUVICE

VOL XXIX. No. 153. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

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FAOR SUGGESTION
CAMPUS THEATER
AS WARMEORIA
WOULD IE FITTING MONUMEN'
FOR HEROES OF
WAR
MAKES POSSIBLE NEW
DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA
Dedicated to "The Living Expressioi
of the Sol of a
People"
(T. F. M.)
With the approach of Commence-
ment day and the first reunion of old
classes since the end of the war, a
tentative plan for the University war
memorial is being seriously discussed
in faculty circles and by the students
on the campus.
Many Suggestions
Several suggestiqZns havie already
been made, including proposals for a
commemorative arch, chimes, a clock,
shafts, or a building of spine nature
to be erected on the campus and to be
used by the students.
For the most part these plans have
not met with favorable and enthusias-
tic reception because it is believed
that, intrinsically, they are too trivial
for the great character of the thing
they, are to represent and symbolize.
An immediate comparison can be seen
in Alumni Memorial hall which
stands as a monument to the
heroes of the Civil war. Dig-
nified in form, impressive in appear-
ance, it partakes of the quality of
beauty and might, an' enduring and
worthy memorial of former fighters
on Michigan's roll of honor. It is
thought that the proposed memorial
should be as large in conception and
as grand in execution.
Campus Theater Suggested
Perhaps the best suggestion so far
submitted is proposed by Pi Delta Ep-
silon, the honorary journalistic fra-
ternity - that of a campus theater.'
Several faculty men also approve of
this plan, while two or three prom-
inent alumni in Detroit and Ann Ar-
bor believe it to be the most suitable
proposal yet offered.
Not purely utilitarian, nor solely a
memorial, a campus theater could
well embody both the practical and
the beautiful. By a combination of its
purposes it would be of such a na-
ture, from the material and aesthetic
point of view, as to be fitly commem-
orative of the participants in the great
event that it seeks to immortalize.
A campus theater would at once
fulfill the requirements that such a
memorial be dignified, symbolic, and
useful. It would be vastly more than
something to look at as a reminder
of the military service of Michigan's
sons, for it would be at the same time
a memorial, and further, would serve
the public use, as the men it com-
memorates have served. Of large pub-
lic benefit, such a memorial would re-
mind people of what it seeks to re-
mind them, and would yield service to
them as long as it stands. It is eas-
ily apparent that a campus theater
would play an important part in the
life of the campus.
Makes Drama Possible
With a campus theater, an entire
new department might be introduced
into the curriculum - dramatic com-
position, play construction, stage di-
rection, and all the similar subjects
that may offer instruction in the high-
' est form of literary art. Such pro-
posals are favorably entertained by
interested authorities, but the absence
of a proper "laboratory" for such ex-
perimental work stands in the way of
realization.
To dedicate the use of the memo-
rial to "the; living expression of the

soul of a people" seems a most appro-
priate sentiment. To permit the stu-
dents the enjoyment of the finest
works of the drama will not only add
to their lives, but will inspire them
with the true significance of that ideal
conception that should be found in ed-
ucation--culture. And it would stand,
living and forever serving, a great
memorial to the men who fought for
the ideal.
It will be well to consider seriously
for a University war memorial, a
campus theater.

NATIONWIDE CELEBRATION TO HONOR
MOTHERS OF AMERICA NEXT SUN

gDAY

With nation wide observance, Moth-
ers' Day promises to be one of fit-
ting tribute and deep reverence for the
mothers of America. Greater signifi-
cance than ever before will be at-
tached to this day of days, Sunday,
May 11, for the mothers of America's
fighting sons are happy in their proud
possession of men who have done'
their share in the recent great war
and who are now returned to them.
Honor for Mothers
And, too, we honor the patriotic
mdther who cherishes the memory of
her son who sacrificed all for his coun-
try and we spay homage to her. To
mothers of sons and daughters of
America this day is dedicated.
By personal request of Secretary of
War Baker every officer and enlisted
man in the army has been asked to
write a letter home on Mothers' Day
"in recognition of the wonderful part
the mothers of America played in
making the world safe for democ-
racy." This message was conveyed
today to the commanding generals of
all the departments by the adjutant
general.
Churches Plan Services
Churches in Ann Arbor are plan--

ning appropriate services and special
music will be rendered for the occa-
sion. The Reverend Dr. Stalker, of
the Methodist church, will deliver a
sermon in the morning entitled, "Moth-
er o' Mine," the theme of which is
taken from one of Rudyard Kipling's
famous works. The choir and a soloist
will give several special numbers and
the thought of the day will be im-
pressed in the Sabbath school.,
Special Music and Sermons
Services in the Congregtional
church will be conducted by the Rev-
erend Lloyd C. Douglas, whose ser-
mon will be "Demobilizing Mother."
Musical numbers fitting in with the
theme of the day will be rendered by
the choir and solos are also included
in the program of the morning.
Communion services will be held in
the Presbyterian church and the Rev-
erend Leonard A. Barrett will deliver
the address of the morning's wor-
ship. Special music is also planned
for these services.
Hearty co-operation the country
over has made "Mothers' Day" an
annual tribute, a day of symbolical
remembrance for our mothers-moth-
ers of America.

GE6RNY REDUCED TO MILITARY IMPOTENCE BY
CRUSHING TERMS OF TREATY; TO-BE DEPRIVED Of'
COLONIES; MUST MAKE REPARATION FOR DAMAGES

WARRIORS ADMIT
10 NEW INDIANS
While the lazy Shawandasee,
Lazy south wind Shawandasee,
Whispered softly Indian legends,
Forth there sprang from lodge and
wigwam,
Warriorsofhthe Michigamua;
Donned their war paint and: their
feathers,
Echoed loud blood- curdling war cries,
Swiftly darting toward the oak-tree,
Swift as arrow the red deer,
So they sought their helpless victims,
Went they first to ancient wigwam,
Where had dwelt the Great Chief An-
gell,
Whom they loved and whom they
honored,
In their songs they sung his glory,
While the pale-face, weak as women,
Waited there to run the gauntlet,
Fearful, made to bear the torture,
Soon were carried to the campfire,
Taken to the tribal wigwam,
There to smoke the pipe of friend-
ship,
Hailed as "Indians" by the nation.
Thus came into Michigamua:
Harry M. Carey, Arthur G. Cross,
Gerald W. Froemke, Carl T. Hogan,
Kenneth T. Knode, William A. Leit-
zinger, Carl E. Johnson, Bruce I. Mil-
lar, R. O. Rychener, and Archie B.
Weston.

WILSON AND LLOYD GEORGE WILL PROPOSE TO THEIR GOVERN.
MENTS IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE TO FRANCE IN CASE
OF TEUTON ATTACK
FRANCE RECEIVES ALSACE AND LORRAINE;
HUN ENVOYS ADMIT OVERWHELMING DEFEAT
"We Know the Power of the German Armies is Broken," Says von Brock-
dorff-Rantzan; Declares Germany Not Solely Culpable; De.
mands Peace Based on Fourteen Points

TO START*FIDA0Y
Varsity Band Will Give Concert on
Campus Band
Stand
GRADUATING CLASS WILL SING
ARRAYED IN CAPS AND GOWNS
Following up their successes of the
past few weeks on the campus and
for the Liberty loan, the Varsity band
at 7 o'clock Friday evening will give
the first of a series of open air con-
certs to be given during the remainder
of the scholastic year from the cam-
.pus band stand. .
Combined with this will be the se-
nior sing, which is given by the grad-
uating class in their caps and gowns
at the first open air concert of the
band. The two promise to give a va-
riety of music.'
The band has been practicing since
Christmas, and after its concerts in
Chicago, Saginaw, and Detroit, is in
good condition. Several times before
the band has expected to begin its
open air concerts, but inclex nt
weather and campus activities have
caused the initial one to be post-
poned.
Captain Wilson expects to begin
promptly at 7 o'clock, providing the
weather permits.
SALARY INCREASE
GAINS POPULARITY
"On account of the promised in-
crease in salaries of the instructors
in the University, I find it very diffi-
cult to entice any of the faculty mem-
bers away or to even have them con-
sider changing colleges," stated Clyde
A. Duniway, president of Colorado col-
lege, who was visiting'the city Wed-
nesday.
President Duniway visited the Uni-
versity for the purpose of securing
prospective instructors for his col-
lege. Every few years he makes a
tour of the various colleges and uni-
versities in the country to' look for
such prospective material.
STEWARDS TO CUT COST OF
FOOD BY CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
Co-operative buying for fraternities
and. house clubs received an impetus
Tuesday evening at the meeting of 22
stewards of the various organiza-
tions. The plan is to lower the cost
of food by buying all the goods to-
gether.
Further progress will be made at
a meeting to be held next Tuesday
evening at the Union at which all the
fraternities and house clubs are ex-
peded to be represented for it is de-
sired to have 40 houses enter into the
agreement.I

MASQUES READY
FOR SHOW TONIGHT

(By Associated Press)
New York, May 7.-The treaty of
peace, submitted to the German. dele-
gates at Versailles today by the repre-
sentatives of the Allied and Associated
powers reduces Germany to military
impotence, deprives here of her colon-
ies, restores Alsace-Lorraine to
France, and provides for reparation to
the nations injured by her in the war.
This was made known today in an
official summary of the treaty, cabled
from the American peace commission
to the committee on public informa-
tion in New York. At the same time

"Quality Street" Fea'uring Humor
J. M. Barrie to be
Shown

of

Germany Humbled In Treaty

GORNETZKY AND GIRLS' GLEE
CLUB WILL FURNISH MUSIC
"Quality Street" is fully prepared for
its opening performance tonight in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The mu-
sic, costumes, and scenery are fin-
ished and after six weeks of careful
preparation Prof. J. R. Nelson pro-
claims the play a finished production.
Play Tasks Ability
This play by Barrie is a great task
of the ability of Masques, with its four
acts of sustained interest and the
famous, subtle Barrie humor. "Those
awful Barrie pauses," said Professor
Nelson, "we think we shall get them
over effectively, except one where we
always succeeded in giving the im-
pression that every one on the stage
had forgotten his lines, and that we
cut."
Play Is Ambitious
When Masques presented Pinero's
"Amazons" last May, it was consider-
ed a daring but highly successful pre-
sentation, but "Quality Street" is a
still more ambitious play and has
been mastered well by the cast.
Cast Is Announced
The cast is composed of Mary Over-
man, '19, as Phoebe Throssel, Wini-
fred Parsons, '19, as Susan Throssel,
Mildred Reindel, '19, as Capt. Valentin
Brown, Blanche Howell, '19, as Pat-
ty, Helen Osband, '19, as Miss Wil-
loughby, Hilda Hagerty, '19, as Fanny
Willoughby, Dyme Bodenstab, '19, as
Henrietta Turnbull, Melba Bastedo,
'19, as Ensign Blades, Anna McGurk,
'20, as Lieutenant Spicer, Marion
Ames,.'20, as Sergeant, Beatrice Mc-
Knight, '19, as Charlotte, and Isabel
Kemp, '22, Elaine Tappan, '19, Eliza-
(Continued on Page Six)
JUNIORS NOMINATE
THREE COUNCILMEN
David B. Landis, David D. Nash, and
J. P.Hart were nominated as can-
didates for the position of student
councilman at a meeting of the junior
literary class which was held Wed-
nesday afternoon in Mason hall.
William D. Craig, manager of the
class track team, issued a call for
more juniors to take part in the in-
ter-class event to be held May 10. So
far only about one man had applied
for each event, he said. Class num-
erals will be given to men capturing
places in the events.
David D. Nash reported for the J-
Hop committee that about $200 to
$250 was netted to the class as profit
on the affair.

(By Associated Press)
Germany, by the terms of the treaty, restores Alsace-Lorraine to France,
accepts the internationalization of the Saar basin temporarily and of the
Danzig permanently; agrees to territorial changes towards Belgium and
Denmark and in East Prussia, cedes most of the Upper Silesia to Poland,
and renounces all territorial and political rights outside Europe, as to her
own or her allies' territories, and especially to Morocco, Egypt, Siam, Li-
beria and Shantung. She also recognizes the total independence of German
Austria, Czecho-Slovakia and Poland.
Her army is reduced to 100,000 men, including officers: conscription
ithin her territories is abolished; all forts 50 kilometers (31 miles) east
of the Rhine razed; and all importation, exportation and nearly all produc-
tion of war material stopped. Allied occupation of parts of Germany will
continue till reparation is made, but will be reduced at the end of each
of three five-year periods if Germany is fulfilling her obligations. Any
violation by Germany of the conditions as to the zone 50 kilometers east
of the Rhine will be regarded as an act of war.
The German navy is reduced to six battleships, six light cruisers, and
twelve torpedo boats, without submarines, and a personnel of not over
15,000. All other vessels must be surrendered or destroyed. Germany is
forbidden to build forts controlling the Baltic, must demolish Helgoland,
open the Kiel canal to all nations, and surrender her fourteen submarine
cables. She may have no military or naval air forces, except 100 un-
armed seaplanes, until October 1, to detect mines, and may manufacture
aviation material for six months.
Germany accepts full responsibility for all damages caused to Allied
and Associated governments and nationals, agrees specifically to reimburse
all civilian damages beginning with an initial payment of twenty billion
marks, subsequent payments to be secured by bonds to be issued at the discre-
tion of the reparation commission. Germany is to pay shipping damage on
a ton-for-ton basis by cession of a large part of her merchant, coasting., and
river fleets and by new construction; and to devote her economic resources
to the rebuilding of the devastated regions.
She agrees, to return to the 1914 most-favored-nation tariffs, without
discrimination of sort: To allow Allied and Associated nationals freedom of
transit through her territories and to accept highly detailed provisions
as to pre war debts unfair competition, internationalization of roads and
rivers, and other economic and financial clauses. She also agrees to the
trial of the ex-kaiser by an international high court for a supreme offense
against international morality and, of other nationals for violation of the
laws and customs of war, Holland to be asked to extradite the former,
and Germany being responsible for delivering the latter.
The League of Nations is accepted by the Allied and Associated powers
as operative and by Germany in principle but without membership. Sim-
ilarly an international labor body is brought into being with a permanent
office and an annual convention. A great number of international bodies
of different kinds and for different purposes are created, some under the
League of Nations, some to execute the peace treaty, among the former
is the commission to govern the Saar basin till a plebescite is held 15 years
hence; the high commissioner of Danzig which is created into a free treaty
under the league, and various commissions for plebescites in Malmody,
Schleswig and East Prussia. Among those to carry out the peace treaty
are the reparations, military, naval, air, financial and economic commissions,
the international high court and military tribunals to fix responsibilities, and
a series of bodies for the control of international rivers.
Certain problems are left for solution between the Allied and Asso-
ciated powers, notably details of the disposition of the German fleet and
cables, the former German colonies, and the values paid in reparation.
Certain other problems, such as the laws of the air and the opium, arms,
and liquor traffic are either agreed to in detail or set for early international
action.

official announcement was made that
President Wilson had pledged himself
to propose to the senate an agree-
ment that the United States in con-
junction with Great Britain would go
to the assistance of France in case' of
an unprovoked attack by Germany.
The announcement of this proposed
agreement was made in a statement
supplementing the official summary
of the peace treaty. The supplement
reads:
"In addition to the securities af-
forded in the treaty of peace, the
President of the United States has
pledged himself to propose to the sen-
ate of the United States and the prime
minister of Great Britain has pledged
himself to propose to the parliament
of Great Britain, in engagement sub-
ject to the approval of the council of
-the League of Nations, to come immed-
iately to the assistance of France in
case of an unprovoked attack by Ger-
many."
Versailles, May 7.-In opening the
session of the peace congress Premier
Clemenceau, the presiding officer,
speaking to the German plenipoten-
tiaries, said:
"It is unnecessary to express need-
less words. You have before you the
plenipotentiaries of the small and
great powers united in this most
cruel war, which was imposed upon
them. The hour has arrived for heavy
settlement of the account."
Paul Dutastas, secretary-general of
the peace conference, delivered a copy
of the treaty to Count von Brockdorff-
Rantzan, head of the German delega-
tion, who made a brief reply. He
said:
"We declare that we do not deny
the extent of our defeat. We know
the power of the German armies is
broken."
He was unable to admit that Ger-
many was solely culpable and demand-
ed that the Allies make peace ac-
cording to President Wilson's points,
Germany pledged herself to repair
the wrong done to Belgium and gave
assurance of the reconstitution of the
territories in northern France. The
German spokesman asked for the lib-
eration of German prisoners and said
that Germany adopted the League of
Nations.

Paris, May 7.-The council of three
has decided upon the disposition of the
former German colonies. -A mandate
for the German Samoan Islands goes
to New Zealand and for the former
German possessions south of the
Equator to Australia. Japan- is to be
mandatory of the islands north of the
Equator.
Start on England to Spain Flight
Margate, Eng., May 7.-Major Darley
of the British army, with two lieuten-
ants and three mechanics, started from
here at 7 o'clock Tuesday morning
on a flight to Madrid.

r STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
( Appointments
( Applications for positions as
managing editors or business
managers -of student publica-
tions must be filed with the
( Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications not later than Friday
afternoon, May 9.

i
i

I

#x -

TONIGHT and
Tomorrow Night
at 8 o'clock
Sarah Caswell
Angell Hall

Quality

Street

MASQUES presents
Its annual play
Open to both Men
and Women

A FOVR-ACT COMEDY BY J. M. BARRIE

Admission Sc

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