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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 19, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ng except Monday
r by the Board in
tions.
OCIATED PRESS
exclusively entitled
on of all news dis-
t otherwise credited
he local news pub-

itered at the pstofice at Ann Arbor,
igan, as secondclass matter...-
scriptions b carrier or ail, $3.5.
fies: Ann Arbor Press Building.
ones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
tmtunicAtions not to exceed oo words,
pidth signature not necessarily to ap-
n print, but asan evidence offth, and
esof."vent will be; published in The
Sat .thediscretion of the editor, if left
- mailed to the office.
signd communications will receive no
eraton. No manuscript will be re-
fd unless the writer incloses postage.
Dilye does not necessarily endorse the
ments ipressed in the communications.
Ireds C.Mighiel.......Manaingditor
id Maakison........Business Manager
rand A.' aines..'.Advertising Manager
s I. Abele......Publication Manager
B3USINESS STA FF
ld M. Major Wi.A. Leitzinger
ATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1918.
Qight Editor-Uarguerite Clark
EIE SPIRIT OF THE FACULTY
ever the faculty of the^ Univer-
of Michigan showed it had the
Michigan spirit - the spirit to
d to duty under all circumstances
Is showing it now. The student
rshould show the same spirit.
re is great danger that the stu-
5 will lot realize that their duty
le University is to grasp and keep
y bit of Michigan spirit that the:
absorb in the course of their mil-
r and classroom instruction. Oth-
se the great blight of the profess-
1 man, the blight of mteralism,
fall upon them..
len the formation of the S. A. T.
iras proposed, it was thought by
bge men that' its purpose was pri-
[ly to instill Into young men, be-
they went to war, a desire to at-
a University, so that they would
6n after the war. Whole heartedly,
y adinistrator and faculty mem-
threw himself into the project.
ks passed, and now it Is clear that
3. A. T. C. is for military purposes
The University is to be used as
of those California orange grad-
to separate the perfect from the
than perfect human material; to
ate commissioned and non-com-
loned officer material, or to -pick
nen capable of being trained to do
essional stunts; to accomplish
ific re ults in war.
is plan is necessary under war
amstances. The faculty recognize
necessity and they see their high
dards of peaceful years smashedk
far, and they never so much as let;
gelid quiver. They buckle to their
duties and when they had time
ream, their dreams of re-estab-
ng the high scholastic and ethical
dards of bygone days related only
LO fture.
e student should not imagine that
. ethical and ,scholastic stand-
" have no practical, workaday im-'
nce. Any professional man, train-
a a high classv university or col-
will testify that the mental at-
e he acquired while at his school-
was one of the principal essent-
of whatever success he may have
ned. The schools indicate a spir-
at spurs pioneering, progress, ser-
rather than gain only. However
ping and material a professional
appear, it is safe to say he would
aich worse, were it not for the
s that seeped Into him during his
ollng.
rther, even if a man Is 'so profic-
in professional studies that the
a leaves him at the University to
i his course, he will not receive
same, broad, well-proportioned
lng that he would receive in]
a times. Then, when he enters the
, his work is to accomplish speci-

lings at high speed, not to in-
not to progress his science. He
ry apt to acquire a passion for
fic results that will be his guid-
hought all his life.
save himself from this material-
and to preserve the desire to
den himself in his science, the stu-
should try consciously and con-
.tiously to catch while here the
t of love of science and of ser-
and of service that the faculty
lisplaying today.t
AMALGAMATION
ring the last three centuries, mil-c
upon millions of immigrants, or#
ims, as we may call them and as
really are, have been coming to1
rica. Coming first from royalistt
and, religiously intolerant, tot
on Plymouth rock, then from
ord-ridden Ireland, from kaiser-1
ed Germanky, from the czar's Russ-
isgoverned Italy, and the brawls

ones came these numerless disunited
pilgrims of many races.
But today the pilgrims are going
back side by side, shoulder to should-
er in united companies, wearing the
uniform of freedom, one and all Am-
ericans. Thousands are returning to
Europe all singing the same songs,
and marching under the same flag.
We see the product of the great melt-
ing pot. Yesterday they came separ-
ately; today they return inseparably.
Yesterday they came as pilgrims; to-
day they return as crusaders.-
It must be a novel experience for
the professor to get to class five min-
utes early and find his class waiting
complacently for him. Under these
circumstances, he will probably de-
cide that Sherman may have been a
bit off after all.
Now that the Russians have disap-
peared from the headlines, Austria-
Hungary obligingly steps into the va-
cancy, furnishing a melee that puts
the whole gang to the eastward to
shame.
Next to deaf and dumb language
the easiest, not to say the most popu-
lar, way to carry on a conversation
while wearing a muslin rag is by
means of the semaphore code.
If the subs don't get the latest news,
what a warm reception they will re-
ceive at their Zeebrugge "home!"
$200 IN PRIZES TO BE GIVEN
FOR ESSAYS ON WORLD PEACE
"The Essential Conditions' of Per-
manent World Peace" is the subject
for the prize essay contest offered
Iby the Michigan historical commis-
sion to teachers of elementary and
high schools, and students of state
normals, colleges and the University.
The sum of $200 is set aside to be
expended in four prizes of $50 each.
The time limit set for the essays is
between October 1, 1918, and April
30, 1919.
In order to enter this contest, ap-
'plication must reach the Secretary of
the Michigan Historical Commission,
Lansing, Michigan, on or before Feb-
ruary 1, 1918. The secretary will as-
sign to each applicant a number
which will be sealed at the office of
the commission until after the con-
test. Essays should be signed only
,with numbers. All essays should be
typed and should not contain more
than 4,000 words. /
The method of treatment must be
primarily historical and should bring
to bear upon the subject all of the
essential facts of recent history rela-
?tive thereto. The text must be am-
ply fortified with references for all
'important statements a d be accom-
panied with a bbliogrkphy of the
'works consulted. Essays must reach
Lansing before April 30, 1919.
,SENIOR SOCIETY TO AID RED
CROSS AND BELGIAN RELIEF
Senior society held its first meeting
this year Thursday ight at West-
minster club. The members discuss-
ed plans for succeeding meetings and
suggested various ways of helping
:the Red Cross and Belgian relief, by
knitting squares to make a blanket,
making shirts out of stocking tops,
sewing for the Red Cross and any
other work that offers itself.
The day of meeting was changed
from Monday, as it was last year, to
Thursday and the members are look-
ing forward to making these bi-
monthly gatherings a time for draw-
ing themselves out of the shell ofj

routine and limited interest, to learn
more intimately what other girls and'
other houses besides their own are
doing.
A special meeting will be held at
lMartha Cook dormitory next Thurs-
day.
NEWBERRY HALL TO BE OPEN
TO ARMY AND NAVY MEN TODAY"
Newberry hall is open today for
army and navy Y. M. C. A. purposes
but will not be fully completed and
finally arranged before Monday. Some
of the desks and tables are being ar-
ianged. Newberry hall will be pri-
marily for the convenience of the"
army and navy men in the south side
of town and Lane hall will continue
to serve in the same capacity as be-
fore.
Programs will be given in the au-
ditorium of Newberry hall every night
for the soldiers and sailors. Speakers
and entertainers from out of town will
be secured and occasionally some local'
talent from the S. A. T. C. will appear
on the programs. Motion picture films
will be run every Wednesday and Sat-l
urday night in the auditorium.
You will always find satisfact'on by
m-ar. +1.i nlonl-A. A!

i

WIomen

I

Many sophomores girls are using
their lockers which were assigned to
them last year. These lockers have
already been assigned to the fresh-
man girls, and sophomores who are
using them are requested to give them
up at once. They may secure other
locker tickets from the treasurer's of-
fice.
There will be extra junior hockey-
practice at 3:30 o'clock this Monday
afternoon.

LU NOT SPREA
MILITARY LA

Wahr's Univ

The Women'a athletic board
meet at 4 o'clock on Monday
noon in Barbour gymnasium.

will
after-

op

The
hold a
ing at

Women's league board will
meeting at 9 o'clock. this morn-
Barbour gymnasium.

Girls who have passed their exam-
inations in first aid for Red Cross
work, are requested to call at the
health service for' further instruc-
tions.
EIGHT WEST POINT
APPLICANTS NAMED
Eightamore candidatesd appied yes-
terday at the army headquarters for
admission to West Point. These ap-
pointments made by Michigan senators
and representatives are as follows:
T. J. Teare (at large), H. Schneider
(2), G. Anderson (3), S. C. Lombard
(8), N. D. Swartzmller (8), H. M.
Wittkop (8), M. S. Lamb, and T. Hol-
land.
The mental examinations for those
not exempt from such, are being held
daily at the Registrar's office. The
applicants coming from accredited
schools and colleges receive three
mental test exemptions. Physical ex-
aminations for all candidates thus far
reported will be held this morning
at the S. A. T. C. headquarters.
Reynold R. Smith, son of Sherley
W. Smith, secretary of the Univer-
sity, was appointed principal by Rep-
resentative Reakes of this congres-
sional district. This appointment
was made some time ago with others.
U. OF M. GRADS TO TAKE WAR
COURSE AT U. OF TORONTO
Anna M. Lloyd, '18, and Helen
Hugmphreys, '16, have volunteered
their services for reconstruction work
in the Military Schol of Orthopedic
Surgery and Physiotherapy at the
University of Toronto, Canada.
The course offered extends over a
period of four months, and is under
the direction of Captain Bott, of To-
ronto university. It includes gymna-
slum work, massage, vocational re-
construction, and the application of
mechanical appliances, and will en-
able those who take it to teach para-
lyzed muscles their accustomed
functions ,and to restore shell-shock-
ed men to useful positions in society.
While theyFrench and the English
have already been awakened to the
necessity for surgical reconstruction
work, there is only one school on this
side of the ocean where the science
of remaking broken and shapeless men
is being taught and studied. The work
at Toronto is- purely voluntary, and
those who have completed the course
are used not only in convalescent
hospitals here, but may also be sent
abroad. Permission to attend this
school may be obtained through au-
thorities in both Washington and
Canada.
Alice Lloyd, '16, Miss Lloyd's sister,
is now taking a nurse's training course
at St. Luke's hospital in New York
city.
Escaped Jail-bird Apprehended
Charles Hale, who escaped from the
county jail last Tuesday night, was
brought back yesterday afternoon. He
had been arrested at Hamberg for
vagrancy and lodged in jail at How-
ell. When questioned he told differ-
ent stories, one of them was that he
was from Toledo, and the other that
he had broken jail from some little
town. The officials became suspicious
and called up the Washtenaw county
sheriff. The turnkey and a deputy
lefa for Howell about noon and return-
ed with their man about 4 o'clock.
It has not yet been decided what
shall be done with him, but it is lia-
ble that he will be bound over to
circuit court.
Snider, '17E, Dies of Pneumoni

Wheeling, W. Va., Oct. 18.- Word
has been received of the death of
Francis McFarland Snider, Michigan
'17E, on board the United States
steamer Von Stueben as a result of
bronchial pneumonia., developing from
Spanish influenza. He enlisted in
August, 1917, and his death occurred
one day before the transport touched
the overseas port.

The rumor that IlI-kept barracks or
similar laxities in the military life of
the students' army training corps are
responsible, for either deaths or t
spread of the influenza, was officially'
denied yesterday by Capt. B. C.
Vaughan, who, as commanding physic-
ian, has charge of the training de-
tachments here. He affirmed that the
strictest surveillance is kept over the
mEen, and that all new cases
of the disease are cared for as quick-
ly as they are reported. No one who
has had illness, no matter how mild
'the form, is allowed to go on duty be-
fore ten days or two weeks have elaps-
ed. The one or two instances of viola-
tion of this rule which have occurred
have been the result of misunder-
standing on the part of the company
commanders.
Captain Vaughan stated that the
facilities for onvalescing soldiers are
of the best type possible, Ann Arbor
having opened its homes in a number
of instances to afford personal care
and cheerful atmosphere for the re-
cuperating patients. In addition to
this, and the official infirmary on In-
galls street, a new infirmary 'has been
opened on State street which will ac-
commodate a large number of men. As
the' men recover, they' are taken to the
Infirmary occupying the Michigan Un-
ion dining hall, where a doctor is in
constant attendance.
It is the physician's opinion that the
epidemic of influenza is decidedly on
the decline. Up to a late hour yes-
terday afternoon, no new cases had
been reported to: him, although a few
convalescing patients had contracted
pneumonia. He stated that the mil-
itary authorities! were doing every-
thing possible to protect the afflicted
men during the critical period immed-
lately following the influenza.
Regarding the closing of the Uni-
versity, Captain Vaughan said that it
might. have proved a very excellent
measure at the outbreak of the epi-

Main St.

Don't fail to visit our new lunch roor

WA HR 'S

TEXT BOOKS. and
ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES
Military Books for the S. A. T.
-a am

State

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

We make our own baked goods.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

338 Maynard

Across from Arc

STEVENS & PERSHING
HAVE YOU TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF THE OPPORTUNITY TI
MONEY ON HIGH CLASS MILLINERY AT THE NEW PAR
ON 618 Pelf

demic,
reason

but that he sees no essential
for such action now.

FOR LIBERTY'

The
ported

following casualties are re-
today by the commanding gen-

See Our Large
Stock of
ELGIN, WALTHAM AND SWISS
MILITARY WATCHES
- Also -
FOUNTAIN PENS
WATERMAM and CONKLIN
Schlanderer
& Seyfried
LIBERTY STREET

Cafe

White
Reserved

Cutting

$5.50 and

eral of the American Expeditionary
forces. Killed in action, 71; wounded
severely, 191; died from wounds, 14;
died from accident and other causes,
4; died of disease, 31; died from aero-
plane accident, 1; wounded, degree
sundetermined, 125. - Total, 561.
Always-Daily service-Always.

Special Sunday Dii

_.1

Students of the

University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new line of

FALL SUITS
and
TOP COATS

Newest materials, newest models, newest;
lowest prices

colorings,

and.

M!M +f
. .
G , / j ..
'1i+" +"//f '
, ,. .: _

_- ..
o.
o
o
o=
.. r .
S
. . . ...
tMRiMYE'iNi YYtiM. - " " s
9

CORONA
The l1ght
portable
typewriter.
Weighs 6V lbs. Over 175,00
use. Indorsed by the U. S. (
ernment. Price complete, v
case, $50.00.
0.D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
Typewriters bought and so
DETROIT UNITED LINER
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor adjL
Detroit Limited and Express Ca
a. i., 8:ro a. m. and hourly to 8:ro
Jackson Limited and' Express Cal
a. im. and every hour to 8:48 p. im.
Local Cars East Bound-5:35 a. r
a. m., 7 :os a. m. and every two 1
7:05 p. i., 8:05 p .m., 9:05p. in.,:
i. To Ypsilanti only:8:o5 pm.
n. 1::45 p. m., 1:ro a. m.,1i a. i
T o Saline change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6 :oa. r
a. i., 10:20 p. m.,a 1:20 midnight.
To Jackson and Kalamnazoo-Limiits
8:48, 10:48 a. m1., 2:48, a:48, 4:4
p. in.
To Jackson and Lansing, Limited c
p. in.
Additional Cars to Ypsilanti- g:$c
2:o5, 6:os, 9:4s p. m., 12:20 midnight
Unigersity Studen
Th rmy and Navy beadqun:
for cleaning and altering uniform
itaeat the cor'ner of N~. Unive
sad Iga~ls,twhere your khaki gars
wil receive special attention by e:
W e call for and deliver with
1 Day Service
W. L. SLEDGB, Prop
Open from 7:oo a. M. to 9:So p.
Phone 2734-W; 2264-J
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTJ
WAI KING L(
Open from 11:30 a. M. to 12:00
Phone 1620-R
814 8. Stat St. . Ann

sTHE,,,

MUMSON

LAST

$5.00 aid $7.00

Awes we

Marching Shoes for Soldier or Civilian
In an age of much rdig we have become a trifle forgetful of the
real uses of feet But Uncle Sam eleotwashoes for his men with the
idea they are: to coyer~ distance in them.
Here is a shoe, a military shoe, with a toe plenty wide, a full tread
and a sturdy heel. It will. add horse-power to your foot-paver for it
makes nothing of the day's work. Try your feet in a pair, you won't
take themof. The regulation Munson Army Shoe at

Courteous and
TREATMENT to c
er, whether the acc
or small.

Ui

Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main St.

Capital and S
Resoures.

R. J. HOFFSTETTER, Prop.

FITTING BYAPPOINTN1

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