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May 07, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ui'E WEATHER
FAI!RUAN) SLIGHTLY
WARMER.

L

Mit 43au

ttlij

ASSzOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AXIR NIGHT WIRIK
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 152.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENT

DEAN ANGELL NOT
COMING HERE AS
UNIVERSITY HEAD
DEFINITE ANNOUNCEMENT PRO-
MISED IN A SHORT
TIME
STATEMENT ISSUED BY
PRESIDENT YESTERDAY
Action Marks End of Negotiations Be-
tween Regents and Chicago
Educator
"Dean James Rowland Angell is not
coming to Michigan," was the official
statement made yesterday by President
Harry B. Hutchins. No further in-
formation could be obtained.
This definitely marks the end of the
negotiations which have been carried
on during the past two months be-
tween the Board of Regents and Dr.
Angell, to whom the presidency of the
University of Michigan had been offer-
ed.
Dean Asked March 12
At the same time that President
Hutchins' resignation was accepted by
the Board at an adjourned meeting
held March 12, an invitation for his
successor was extended to Dr. James
Rowland Angell. dean of the faculties
of the University of Chicago and son
of former President James Burrii
Angell. '
Since Dr. Angell's receipt of the in-
vitation, he has kept close relationship
with the Board. President Hutchins,
for the purpose of consulting with kM
made a trip to Chicago on Friday,
March 14, but upon his return stated
that things were unsettled concerning
the matter.
Negotiations Prolonged
On March 28, Dr. Angell met several
of the members of the Board in De-
troit, when again no decision was made'
At a meeting of the Regents held Fri-
day, April 25, the Board disposed of
the matter of the presidency by ad-
journing until the following Thursday.
By this time it was expected that the
members would have arrived at a de-
finite decision regarding the conditions
stipulated by Dr. Angell, and that an
understanding would have been reach-
ed.
Appeared Here May 2
At this meeting held Thursday, May
2, Dr. Angell came in person to Ann
(Continued on Page Six)
BACTERIA RESPONSIBLE
FOR LIGHT IN ANIMALS
PROF. HARVEY OF PRINCETON
LECTURES ON GLOW IN
PLANT GROWTH
"Bacteria cause illumination in an-
imals and fungi in inanimate matter,"
was the statement of Prof. E. New-
ton Harvey, of Princeton university,
in his lecture on the "Nature of Ani-
mal Light" in the Natural Science
auditorium Tuesday night. "Thus it
can be seen that these minute organ-
isms are the cause of the light of the
firefly, and that plants are responsi-
ble for the glow in wood and decay-
ing matter.
"Thirty-six orders in the animal
kingdom and two-i: the plant have
this ability to produce light. The light

of the plants is cast in a steady glow,
while the animals throw a fitful light,
and need a shake to stimulate the
glow.
All Classes Give Light
"Animals with light-giving proper-
ties are found in all of the classes,
starting with the lowest. One of the
members of the crustaceans can be
ground up after a quick drying and
when water is added, a light -vill
come from the remains of the ani-
mal.
"Actual production of light is caus-
ed by the oxidation, of chemIcal mate-
rial in the body of the animal Water,
oxygen, and two substances known as
luciferen and luciferase, are the nec-
essary links in this process. When
oxidized by water the two latter sub-
stances act on each other in such a
way as to produce a soft glow."
Experiments Made
After the lecture Professor Harvey
performed a few experiments to make
more clear the points he brought out
while speaking.

MICHIGAMUA TO GO
ON WARPATH TODAY
FOR TEN PALEFACES
When from out the paleface wigwam
From behind the staring moon-face
Comes the slow and solemn six strokes
Telling that the Evening Spirit
Wanders over woods and meadows
Lights the campfires of the heavens.
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their war paint
Soon will gather round the oak tree
Round the oak tree called the Tappan
There to greet the trembling paleface.
Ten in number wait the bidding
Of the loud, rejoicing redskins
For before they take the long trail
To the home of Michigamua
Many trials and many tortures
First must show their strength and
courage
Ere thered man bids them welcome
Ere he calls each paleface "Indian"
Ere the peace-pipe smoke together.
"CUME ON DAD"5CAST
HOLD LAST MEETING

TREATY PRESENTED TO MINOR POWERS;
NUMEROUS COMPLAINTS NOT SERIOUS

PI-WR ENTHUSIASMAMPAINT AT
SINTRODUCTIGN OF NEW MICHIGAN

(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 6. - The peace treaty
was presented to' the minor powers at
a secret plenary session this after-
noon which adjourned at 5:15 o'clock.
The draught of the treaty is considered
now as having passed the final stage
before being presented to the Ger-
mans.
Marshal Foch in a speech at the
plenary session declared that the se-
curity given France was inadequate
from a military point of view, and
said it was his personal conviction
that the treaty should not be signed.
The marshal emphasied the neces-
sity of France's holding the bridge-
heads along the Rhine, and said that
occupation limited to 15 years was
not sufficient.
The Italian spokesman said he de-
sired to make reservations concern-
ng any provisions in the treaty not
acceptable to Italy.
Lu Cheng Hsiang, Chinese foreign
minister, asked for reconsideration of
the decision regarding Shantung and
Kiao Chow. He said that, in the opin-

ion of the Chinese delegation, the de-
cision had been made without regard
for justice or for the protection of the
territorial integrity of China. He said
that if reconsideration was impossible
he desired to make reservation on be-
half of China.
The Portuguese delegates expressed
dissatisfaction regarding the treat-
ment accorded Portugal.
The protests made by the various
delegations are not regarded as seri-
ous, since no definite reservations were
made by the protesting parties. Italy
was represented at the session by Sig-
nor Crespi.
The Chinese delegation..has appeal-
ed to President Wilson to intercede
with the conference officials to have
China included among the powers per-
mitted to attend the presentation of
the peace treaty totthe Germans. The
name of China is not on the list of 13
states so privileged. The states are:
the United States, Great Britain and
her dominions, France, Italy, Japan,
Belgium, Brazil, Serbia, Greece, Po-
land , Portugal, Roumania and Jugo-
Slavia.

TRADITION.

"PEP" PREDOMINATII

BANQUET AT UNION FOR MEN
OPERA FINISHED SEA-
' SON

IN

"Come On, Dad" officially became
past history Tuesday night at the
banquet given for the 125 men of the
opera by the board of directors of the
Union.
Short talks on the show and side-
lights on the trip were given by a
number of the men. Director Morti-
mer E. Shuter congratulated the act-
ors and thanked them for their hearty
cooperation. Earl V. Moore, musical
director, spoke briefly about the suc-
cess of the opera. Phil Diamond en-
tertained with musical selections and
songs from the opera score were sung.
A list of the men who had been
chosen for the Mimes was read and
each of the neophytes was required to
address the assemblage. The men
elected were: Matthew Towar, '19;
James E. White, '21; Paul Wilson, '21;
George Duffield, '21; George E. Rog-
ers, '20E; David Nash, '20; Reed Bach-
man, '20; Archie D. McDonald, '20;
Laurel Lundquist, '19; Carl H. Mason,
'20; Phil Diamond, '21; George 11.
Roderick, '21E; Merle Kann, '20; Wal-
ter Tschaeche, '20E; Harold F. Stot-
jzer, '20; William W. Hinshaw, '20;
William Leitzinger, '20; Gilbert P.
Schaefer, '20E; Hugo E. Braun, '20E;
Clayton Shoemaker, '20E; William
Favorite, '20E; John Reilly, '20; Rus-
sell Barnes, '20; Walter Reiss, '20;
William Frazer, '20E.
The Mimes' initiation immediately
followed the banquet.
CHEMISTS TO HEAR
LECTURE ON GLASS
Mr. Geo. W. Morey, of the Spencer
Lens Company, will speak on "The
Manufacture of Optical Glass" at 8
o'clock on Friday evening in the
amphitheater of the Chemistry build-
ing.
Mr. Morey is the superintendent of
the optical glass plant of the Spen-
cer Lens company and has had charge
of the development of the optical glass
industry in this country. Formerly all
the glass used in our better instru-
ments was imported from Jena, Ger-
many, but as this supply was cut off
by the war we have had to perfect
our dqmestic product and build up an-
other *ew industry.
SCHOOL MEN'S CLUB WILL
HEAR DETROIT PRINCIPAL
Edwin L. Miller, principal of North-
western high school of Detroit, will
speak to the University school imen's
cub at 7 o'clock Thursday night in
the new Union. His subject will be
"Segregation of the English House
System in the High School."
Mr. Miller, who is prominent in De-
troit educational circles, is considered
a convincing speaker.
Type of German Souvenirs Changing
Coblenz, May 6.-Soldiers of the
American Army of Occupation in the
region of Coblenz have been sending
tome more souvenirs recently than at
any previous time since the Ameri-
cans reached the Rhine. At first these
souvenirs consisted of German hel-
nets, iron crosses, bayonets and other
grticles of war used by the defeated
army, but of late the soldiers have
been buying German steins and other
articles made of pottery,

NAVAL MILITIA UNIT
TO RECORD HISTORY
War Work of Michigan Fighting Body
Will Be Compiled in Pam-
phlet Form

TWO DIVISIONS CALLED
DUTY IN FIRST DAYS

FOR
OF WAR

In pamphlet form of about 50 prages,
a history of the Michigan Naval Mil-
itia, formerly known as the 7th and
8th divisions, 1st battalion, Michigan
Naval Militia, is being compiled un-
der the direction of Mr. Joseph Ral-
ston Hayden of the ecofomics depart-
ment. Mr. Hayden served as a-lieu-
tenant in the organization. Assisting
him in the editing of the history are
John Simpson, '19L, and Bradford C.
Colcord, '21E.
Unit Numbered 157
Decision was reached at one of the
two banquets of the reorganized mil-
itia held during the second semester
to publish this history, giving a list
of the 157 men including the officers,
and a brief story of the work done by
the divisions.
Organized Jan. 10, 1917, the divi-
sions were called, into service April
6, 1917. They drilled on the campus
for six weeks and then left for Great
Lakes May 26, 1917.
Soon the organization was split up,
some being assigned to rifle range
duty, others to transport duty, and 30
to work in the naval battery. It is a
significant fact that of the men 65 per
cent were commssoined before the end
of the war.
Militia Now Campus Society
The six original officers in the mili-
tia were lieutenants, J. Ralston Hay-
den, McNeil, '17E; lieutenants, J.
G., Arthur E. Boak, Harrington, '17;
ensigns, A. H. Jenkins, '17, K. W.
Heinrichs, '17E. Now the militia has
become a campus organization.
It is expected that the history will
appear the latter part of May. It
will probably sell for about a dollar.
ROVILLAIN TO VISIT
UNIVERSITY TODAY
Lieut. Eugene E. Rovillain, former
instructor in the French department
of the University who enlisted in the
French army in May, 1918, will arrive
in Ann Arbor this morning for a visit
to the University.
Up until last week it was expected
that Lieutenant Rovillain would re-
turn to take up his instructorship
again, but word was just received by
Prof. Arthur G. Canfield from him
stating that he had accepted a position
with a large firm whose business lay
in Mexico. Before Lieutenant Rovil-
lain's first visit to the University in
1917, he had been working in Mexico
for another company.
New Cuban Naval Shipyard Planned
Havana, May 6.-Plans for a new
naval shipyard to be constructed on
the grounds of the Tiscornia immigra-
tion station back of Morro castle,
across Havana harbor from the capi-
tal, have been submitted to President
Menocal by Capt. Sidney Henry, United
States Naval Engineer, and Command-
er Kear of the Cuban Naval Academy.

COMMITTEE SETS
CAP NIGHT. DATE
May 23 Is Selected, Night Following
End of Spring Games; Many
Visitors Expected
"POTS" AGAIN TO BE GIVEN
TO BELGIAN RELIEF CAUSE
Cap night, culminating the week of
Spring Games, has been set for -Fri-
lay, May 23. In setting this date the
committee in charge took into con-
sideration the fact that on the same
day the Y. M. C. A. is having seniors
from 150 of Michigan's high schools
in Ann Arbor to interest them in the
University, and also the fact that it'
is the date of the inter-scholastic
track meet.
"Pots" to Go for '22ers
It is on Cap night that, complying
with one of Michigan's longest es-
tablished traditions, the freshman dis-
cards his "pot"; it is on Cap night al-
so that the sophomores become juniors
on campus; the juniors, seniors; and
the seniors, about to go out from their
alma mater into the world.
This year as usual there will be the
giant bon-fire, the snake dance, and
the speeches, but once again the
"pots" wil not be burned. Instead they
are to be thrown into boxes and turn-
ed over to the Red Cross, which will
make use of them in its Belgian relief
work. In this connection it is hoped
that the upper-classmen who still
have their toques will bring them and
hand them over to the Red Cross at

I-
LOAN GOIN( BETTER
Washington, May 6. - Sub-
scriptions to the Victory Liber-
ty Loan as officially tabulated I
to the treasury tonight totalled
$2,060,000,000. Officials regard-
ed this as an encouraging in-
crease over yesterday's total.
FIVE1YEARCOUSE MAY
COMBINETWO 1DEGES
ENGINEEIUNG AND LITERARY
COLLEGES PLAN NEW
CURRICULUM
Adoption of a combined curriculum
of five years giving two degrees, one,
from the literary college and one from
the engineering college, was secured
three years ago in the engineering col-1
lege, but the plan was rejected by,
the faculty of the literary college.
The objection to the proposed plan
was that five years was too short aA
time to secure two degrees, especially
when a longer time is required in all
other combined courses. A revival of1
this idea or of some other was re-
cently raised when a committee of six
,members, three from each college, was
appointed to investigate the feasabili-
ty of a combined curriculum.
Albion Sends Men Here
The o14 plan called for three years'
work in the literary college, one year
with double registration after whicha
an A.B. would be granted, and the fifth
year in the engineering college, upon
the completion of which a B.S. would
be given. Such a system is used be-
tween Albion college and Michigan.
Three years are spent at Albion and
the student then comes to Michigan,
Upon the completion of the fourth
year he returns to Albion and receives
his degree and then after the fifth
year he is graduated from the engi-
neering college.
Technical Work Necessary
The literary college faculty did not
believe that sufficient technical work
could begiven in this two year course,
but the engineering faculty thought
that with preparatory work in phys-
ics, chemistry, and other necessary sci-
ences, that it could be done. The
joint committee which has been ap-
pointed may follow this plan or may
investigate other methods which might
.prove superior.
Even if the committees reported fav-
orably upon some solutions, it would
mnot necessarily mean that it would be
adopted by both faculties. As yet the
two committees have notsbeen appoint-
ed. Dean Cooley expects to select his
committee immediately and President
Harry B. Hutchins will do so as soon
as possible.
DUNNE ELECTED '22
ATHLETIC MANAGER
Jerome Dunne, '22, was elected ath-
letic manager of the freshman class at
the meeting Tuesday in University
ball. It was also decided that the Fro-
lic to be held in Barbour gymnasium,
May 16, should be summer formal.
The duties of the athletic manager
will be to confer with the freshman
engineering class for the spring games,
and to handle all athletic activities
of the class.
The social committee reported on the
plans for the Frolic. Barbour gym-
nasium will be a mass of green and
white under which the Pontchartrain

orchestra will play. Admission is
$2.20.
Dues will be collected in the corridor
of University hall Wednesday. Tickets
for the Frolic are on sale at the Un-
ion and are going fast for only 200
are to be sold.
,Burleson Upheld in Excluding Paper
Washington, May 6. - Postmaster
General Burleson's action in excluding
certain copies of the Milwaukee Lead-
er, Victor Berger's paper, from the
mails was upheld today by the Court
of Appeals here.

THREE SPEAKERS DWELL
PRINCIPLES OF UNI-
VERSITY

I

BAND, YELLS, AND SONGS
GIVE OLD-TIME P U N C H
Spirit Fostered for Respect Toward
President and Upperelass-
men
LETS GO MICHIGAN!
Cheering, stamping, yelling and
singing, the Michigan student body
gave vent to the pentup enthusiasm,
suppressed since pre-war days, with
the introduction of the newest of
Michigan traditions-Tradition' day-
last night at 1ill auditorium, in a
monster mass meeting that bids well
to take its place among Michigan's
most famous events.
"Believe in Michigan"
Before a representative campus as-
sembly three speakers enforced the
principles for which Michigan has al-
ways stood. With one representing
the student body, another the faculty,
and the third, the alumni, every phase
of Michigan tradition was covered.
"Make up your minds that from
now on there is but one institution in
which you are interested, the Univer-
sity of Michigan," was the keynote of
the affair struck by "Ed" Shields, '94,
speaking for the alumni. "Believe in
Michigan," was sent reverberating
through the alrge auditorium by the
speaker. "A Michigan student is a
dead fellow who doesn't believe in
Michigan," he pointed out to them,
and was upheld by repeated cheers.
From the very moment the first
notes of "The Victors" were sounded
out by the band, until the close of the
meeting, all attention was centered
upon the speakers.
Tells of Michigan in Spirit
"Michigan spirit has never been .de-
fined," was the point brought out by
through the large auditorium by the
student body. "But we know when we
have it," he forcefully added.
"Traditions' day,' 'he said, speak-
ing of the new custom established last
night, "will forever remain the day
when Michigan students will gather to
consecrate themselves anew to what
Michigan is, what Michigan stands for,
and what Michigan shall always be."
Professor John C. Parker-of the en-
ginering department, follwed Mr
Carson on the program with an in-
terpretation of the faculty standpoint
on Michigan traditions. The professor
did not apologize for representing the
faculty, but proclaimed himself an en-
thusiastic grad feeling like an under-
graduate.
"The best kind of a tradition that
we can have," he said, "is Univer-
sity consciousness. If you believe tha
they make for the MAN; stand up for
(Continued on Page Six)
"QULITY STREET" HS
ITS DRESS REHEARSIL
ONE OF MASQUE'S PURPOSES
REALIZED IN PLAY PRO-
DUCTION
With especially designed scenery
settings and costumes, a dress rehear-
sal for "Quality Street," annual pla
of Masques, was held last night i
Sarah Caswell. Angell hall where i
will be presented on May 8 and 9. The
orchestra under the direction of A. J
Gornetzky, '19L, played the incidental
music and the several children in th
play rehearsed their parts.
In presenting "Quality Street," Ma,
ques is realizing one of the purpose
of the organization. The aim of Mas-
ques is two-fold and is open to al
women on the campus. It provide

dramatic training for its members and
also tries to raise the standard o:
amateur plays presented here. All the
proceeds of capacity houses is invested
each year in their production, making
it the best within their power to pre
sent.
Tickets are now on sale in Uni
versity hall, at Wahr's and may be ob
tained from any of the /members o
Masques.

[this time.

/"

All Plans Not Settled
Complete plans.for the evening have
not yet been settled, but the commit-
tee in charge is now arranging for
speakers, and is laying out the pro-
gram, which -will be announced soon.
The committee consists of: Curtis E.
Bottum, '20E, chairman; Walter Nu-
gent, '19A; G. D. Anderson, '20; C. B.
Campbell, '19E.
CARL JOHNSON CALLS BIG
MEETING OF JUNIOR LITS
Three points of prime interest will
come before the Junior lit class at the
meeting to be held at 3 o'clock today
in University hall. Carl Johnson,
president, is anxious to have every
member of the class out to give con-
sideration to the questions.
The most important item is the nom-
ination of three men for the Student
council. These men will be placed
on the ballot and be voted on at the
all-campus election, May 28.
A discussion will be held to decide
the class policy on the inter-class
track meet on May 10 and the base-
ball series.
An explanation of the new scheme
for the payment of class dues is the
last piece of business on the program
at present. The dues may be c:mbin-
ed with the tuition so that the trou-
ble now incurred in collecting will be
eliminated.
English Feel Demand for Typewriters
London May 6.-British typewriter
firms are striving to produce more ma-
phines to meet the present great de-
mand.

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