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May 04, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-04

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

LY G

.434t

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

--

VOL. XXIX. No. 150.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 4, 1919.

PRICE THREE

a

GOVERNOR APPROVES APPROPIATION
FOR UNIVERSITY; BUILDING PROGRAM
MAYNOWBE CARRIED TO COMPLETION

BILL AGGREGATING MORE THAN
TWO MILLION, SIGNED BY
EXECUTIVE
MEASURE PASSES BOTH
HOUSES UNANIMOUSLY
Largest Special Biennial Amount Ever
Given State Institution by
Legislature
Governor Albert E. Sleeper, yester-
day, affixed his signature to Univer-.
sity bills aggregating $2,200,000, the
largest special appropriation for one
biennium that the University has ever
received. The special clause giving
immediate appropriations was in-
cluded.
The bills, which had passed the two
houses without a dissenting vote, are
irrespective of the regular biennial in-
come which amounts to $2,100,000.
These extra grants together with the
regular income make a total of
$4,300,000, which will be at the dis-
posal of the University for the next
two years.
Large Building Program
With the procurement of $1,200,000
of this amount as special appropria-
tions for building purposes alone,
President Harry B. Hutchins has
brought to a close, the building pro-
gram of his administration. Further-
ance of his construction policy, as-
sured by the passage of the bills, in-
cludes expenditures to be used to-
wards a new hospital, and for a model
training school, and the completion
of the general library.
The regular income of the Univer-
sity from the three-eighths of, a mill
tax, based upon the present equaliz-
ed valuation of the property of the
state, is $1,050,000 a year. The spe-
cial appropriation for maintenance
that passed the legislature is $350,000
a year for two years. This will make
the regular income of the University,
which will be used to meet the run-
ning expenses of the institution,'
$1,400,000 a year for the next two
eyears.
Besides the $1,200,000 for building
purposes, the special grants include
$300,000 to meet a deficit in the cur-
rent expenses of the University, caus-'
ed by the war conditions, for the pe-
riod ending Dec. 31, 1918.
Will Start New Hospital
Through President Harry B. Hutch-
ins' efforts, the University will re-
ceive two new buildings and will com-
plete another. For the construction,
equipping, and furnishing of a Univer-
sity hospital building, $700,000 was
appropriated by the legislature. This
means that the University will haves
$1,015,000 toward a new hospital. The
additional $315,000 comes from an ap-
propriation of $350,000 made in 1917,'
of which only $35,000 has already been
used for the erection and furnishingt
of a children's ward at the Universityf
Homoeopathc hospital.
Por the building and equipping of a1
model high school for the department1
of education of the University, to be
used for the practical training of highI
school teachers, the special appropri-
ation of $300,000 has been made. ThisI
item was thought to have been lostt
at first for the ways and means com-
mittee of the house had not included
it with the others when the latter were£
first reported out. But the orignal
bill was later recalled by the commit-
tee and provision for this appropria-t
tion was inserted. The model school,
which has been endorsed by practically
every sort of organized educational
body in the state, will in no way con-}
(Continued on page five) a
FRESH LITS MEET TUESDAY
TO DISCUSS FROLIC PLANS]
Athletic Manager Will Be Elected and
Plans for Interclass Games
Will Be Decided
Plans for the Frosh Frolic, for ath-c

letic events, and for the spring games1
will be discussed at the meeting of thea
freshman lit class to be held at 4
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in Univer-
sity hall.N
Important matters are still unsettled
about the Fresh Frolic as it has notl
been decided whether the affair will
be formal or informal. More detailed
announcements will be made concern-
ing the sale of tickets.
In the interclass games the frosh
lits are planning to take a large
part. To further this purpose, anI
athletic manager will be elected It
is probable that some report will be
made as to the plans for the inter-
class games.

MAKES POSSIBLE BEGINNING OF
PROPOSED MODERN HOS-
PITAL
SIX STORY EDIFICE
TO BE BEGUN JULY 1
Construction to be Modern in Every
Respect; Shaped Like a
Double Y
Plans for the new University hos-
pital, for which the legislature has
authorized an appropriation of $700,-
000, calls foria building 420 feet long
and six stories high, to contain 640.
beds. With a previous appropriation
of $315,000, this makes a total of
$1,015,000 / now available for the
structure, ground for which will be
broken about July 1.
In designing the building, the arch-
itects have hit upon a plan, unique
and peculiarly adapted to its pur-
pose. The hospital proper is to be in
the form of two "Y's" whose bases
meet in the middle.
Modern S Rays
One oftthe features of the hospital
will be the entire main floor which
will be given over entirely to diag-
nosis work. On this floor will be
found the offices, and teachers of diag-
nosis work. Another feature will be
the complete X-ray department. Here
the, newest X-ray devices will. be in-
stalled.
The building will be of re-enforced
concrete construction with a brick
curtain wall. It is expected that it
will require one and one-half years
to build the frame and outside walls,
alone. When the time comes it will
be possible to add four stories to the
hospital, which will then allow it to
accommodate 1,200 patients.
Dr. Christopher G. Parnall, discuss-
ing the future of the hospital, said,
"I consider it as a community hospi-
tal for the state. It serves particu-
larly the rural sections that are not
adequately provided with hospital
service. There will be a steadily in-
creasing demand on iJs services.
Lasting Tribute
"A project of this magnitude will
stand a lasting tribute to the enter-
prise of both the state and the Uni-
versity. To have Ann Arbor the site
of the largest hospital of its type in
the entire world means more to the
University than any other event which
has ever happened, in recent years."
PASSAGE OF BILL
HONORS PitESIDENT
Requesting that the legislature ap-
propriations bill for the University be
officially sanctioned in honor of Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins, Representa-
tive Charles Evans of Lenawee coun-
ty features the final success of the
measure, and places the great honor
of responsibility for the favorable ac-
tion to the sole credit of Dr. Harry
B. Hutchins.
Although the farmer faction in the
house has always been agreeable to
the University budget, in few cases
has it been its protagonist and chai-
pion, and as Representative Evans is
the recognized leader of this branch
of the legislators, the decided change
of former policy, due to the strenuous
and tactful efforts of the president,
augurs well for the future well being
of the University.
The coalition of the farmers with
the other members of the house was
an aid in passing the bill, and it is
believed that it is due to their influ-
ence, that the clause was included
whereby the measure takes immedi-
ate effect.
LOCKWOOD OFFERS
TWILIGHT CONCERT
Mr. Samuel Pierson Lockwood will
present the University Symphony or-
chestra in its last program of the year
at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon in Hill

au;datorium.
fir. James Hamilton, tenor, of the
U iversity School of Music faculty,
will be soloist.
The program will consist of the fol-
lowing numbers:
"Egmont" Overture, Op. 84.. Beethoven
Symphony No. 39, E flat......Mozart
Adagio-Allegro: Andante
conamoto; Menuetto;
Finale (allegro)
Aria, "Celeste Aida".........Verdi
James Hamilton
"Peer Gynt" Suite, Op. 46....Grieg
(1) Dawn; (2) Ase's death; (2)
Anitra's dance; (4) In the Hall of
the Mountain King

THE PROPOSED UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

WITH AI1STRIE
GIVES GRAPHIC ACCOUNT OF
BATTLES IN AIR, WITH HUN
FLYERS
SAW BELLEAU WOODS
CONFLICT FROM AIRj
Witnesses Capture of Michigan Man,
Casgrain, '18, Who Falls With
Broken Wing
Ann Arbor and the University open-
ed their arms, last night, to Capt.
Eddie Rickenbacker, America's Ace
of Aces and welcomed him as their
hero, as every city in which Ricken-
backer has spoken has. ,
Prof. W. C. Hoad formerly colonel
in the engineering department intro-
duced Rickenbacker, after which the
Ace took the floor and with his deep
clear and resonant voice quickly won
his way. into the favor of the audience.
Rickenbacker is over six feet in
height, one who would make Yost
smile with satisfaction to see him on
Ferry field in moleskins.
Memories Dear to Hm
Rickenbacker opened his talk by
saying that he did not care to go
through the experiences again but
would not take Europe for the mem-
ories of them. Then he spoke feeling-
ly of his pals-now dead- men such
as Lufberry and Luke and others of
air-fighting fame, with whom he had
lived, taken his first lessons and with
whom he had faced death.
The captain explained the types of
planes in a simple and clear manner
which even the least technical mind
might understand which proved inter-
esting. Here he admitted that the
German Folker was superior to the AlI
lied machines and that they gave
them much trouble.
As to the feeling of fighting in the
air Rickenbacker said it was hard to
describe. One has little time to think,
but after it is over one thinks of what
might have happened and a chill pass-
es over. "It is hard to think you are
fighting a real living, breathing, man
like yourself, it makes you hate war
all the more after /coming out of a
battle successfully?"
Learns More By Experience
Rickenbacker claimed that he learn-
more in his first flight over Hun land
than he did in the entire flying school,
and included a story of how he started
out to get his first plane. Just as he
was about to open fire, he said, he dis-
covered it was a French three seater.
He was experiencing the lack of air
vision ability to recognize planes,
which only comes by long service in
the air.
(Continued on page six)

MICHIGAN SECOND
IN ORATORY MEET
One point's difference sent Michigan
into second place in the contest of the
Northern Oratorical league held at
Evanston, Ill., last Friday night. Alice
M. Hoelzle, '19, secured the Governor
Lowden testimonial of $50 for second
honors with her speech, "The Voice of
Armenia."
Iowa's representative won first
place, securing the Governor Lowden
testimonial of $100. Illinois won third
place.
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, who presided
at the contest, and Miss Hoelzle re-
turned to Ann Arbor riaturday even-
ing.
"I am highly pleased by the man-
ner with which Miss Hoelzle handled
herself," said Professor Trueblood
when questioned as to the results of
the contest. "Considering the fact that
she left the hospital just last Monday,
that she had but little rehearsal on
her rewritten speech, and that she had
no vigorous drill before the contest,
Miss Hoelzle is to be congratulated
highly on securing second place. She
did her best."
WILL BE STAGED

UNION CAMPAIGN
CLOSES WITH 1010
NEW MEMBERS

GOAL OF 1,000 PASSED WITH
EXTRA SUBSCRIPTIONS
ON LIST

101

Plot Typifies Characteristic
Humor and Swift Action
Throughout %

Barrie

CAST INCLUDES ALL MEMBERS
OF MASQUES-THREE STARRING
"Quality Street." which is one of
James Barrie's best known plays and
which was produced with great suc-
cess by Maude Adams, will be pre-
sented by Masques on May 8 and 9
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Excellent costumes have been pro-
cured from a Chicago firm. Prof. J.
R. Nelson, director, declares that the
property room is filled with the choice
period pieces, old blue china, and rare
Sheffield silver which are typical of
the era of Napoleonic wars when the
story is supposed to have taken place.
Mary Overman, '19, Starring
The 25 girls in Masques are includ-
ed in the cast, the heaviest burden
falling on Mary Overman, '19, as
Phoebe Thrassel; Winifred Parsons,
'19, as Susan, and Mildred Reindel,
'19, as Captain Valentine Brown. The
presence of a number of small chil-
dren adds interest to the play and
their enthusiasm has been well kept
up during the six weeks of rehearsals.
Girls' Glee Club to Sing
The Girls' Glee club will sing, and
Abraham Gornetszky, '19L, will furn-
ish the music incidental to the play.
Contrary to general belief both per-
formances in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall will be open to men and women.

WEATHERS WINS RACE
WITH 69 SIGNATURES
Expect Result to Encourage Alumni
Into More Action; Assures
Student Support
Pasting, by 10 memberships, the
goal of 1,000 set by the committee,
the Michigan Union's campaign for
life members came to a successful
close Saturday afternoon. The time
limit was extended until noon because
of the fact that so many events in-
terfered with sthe soliciting Friday
evening. The complete list of cards
could not be tabulated until 5 o'clock
Saturday afternoon.
Weathers Leads Race
W. B. Weathers, '21E, leads in the
race for individual honors with 69
signatures secured, 28 more than his
nearest rival. Weathers' aggregation
also heads the list in the team com-
petition by getting 170 members.
The men who come closest to Weath-
ers in individual results are:. W. P.
Favorite, 20E, and D. J. Porter, '21E,
tied with 41; H. C. Skinner, '21, and
T. R. Gustafson, tied with 24. Much
team spirit was evidenced during the
campaign, and the leaders were close-
ly watched by their rivals as finish
drew near. Weathers' sudden jump
was rather a surprise as last night's
returns did not give him a' place.
among the leading men.
The captains of the five teams with
the bestscores are: W. B. Weathers,
'21E, 170; W. R. Frazer, TOE, 122;
R. F. Grindley, '21E, 114; W. P. Fav-
orite, '20E, 90; L. R. Van Ness, '20, 85.
Chairman Satisfied
Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E, general
chairman of the drive, declared him-
self as greatly pleased with its suc-
cess as he felt that the $50,000 gained
for the fund to complete the Union
building would show the alumni how
much the undergraduates desire its
completion. It is expected that the
results obtained among the students
will have a tendency to speed up the
campaign for subscriptions among the
alumni.
The 1010 new members secured are
said to exceed the number gained in
any other campaign in the past. This
year it is declared to be especially
noteworthy on account of the com-
paratively few men students in the
University.

HUGE "PEP" MEET
WL INAUGURATE
THADITIONS DAY
ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STUDENT
BODY TO TAKE PART IN
RALLY
TO BE ANNUAL EVENT
HELD FIRST OF YEAR
Expect Entire University Present At
Monster Gathering Tuesdy
Night
A program that promises to make
the mass meeting, Tuesday night in
Hill auditorium, one of the greatest
ever held at the University, has been
completed and announced by the Stu-
cent council.
"Snap and Pep," is to be the motto
of the affair, which is expected to
bring these qualities before the atten-
tion of the campus, as they have been
in the past.
Promptly at 8 o'clock, the program
will begin, and every minute is to be
filled with something of vital import-
ance, according to Ralph Gault,"'19,
chairman of the meeting.
Shields to Speak
Three speeches representing the
alumni, faculty and student body, will
be featured on the program., "Ed."
Shields, former chairman of the state
democratic committee, and promin-
ent figure in state politics, will speak
for the alumni, while Prof. John C.
Parker of the engineering college will
represent the faculty. Ralph Carson,
grad., wil speak for the student body.
The University band, headed by Cap-
tain Wilson, will be present in full un-
iform, while the Glee club will do its
share in taking care of the musical
end. G. G. Whitney, '21, will act as
cheer-leader. University songs, and
yells will be in evidence.
Fully the entire student body of
the University is expected to be pre-
sent' The first balcony has been re-
served for the women.
"We are going to make it a short,
snappy affair, full of pep, and we're
going to tear the roof off with Mich-
igan spirit," is the way Gault charact-
erized the affair.
It will be the first of the a'nual
"Tradition Days," which the council
is going to authorize at its next meet-
ing, according to Gault, who is presi-
dent of the Student council.
"Traditions Day" Before Council
"The proposition of 'Traditions
Day' will come before the council for
ratification, at its next meeting, "he
said yesterday, "and there is absolute-
ly no doubt about its passage. It will
be an annual event from now on."
Gault also said that instead of hold-
ing the meeting in the spring of the
year, it would be held in the fall.
This, he says, will be a more advant-
ageous time.
Class pep meetings, for the discus-
sion of the spring games, will be
held later in the week. Final arrange-
ments will then be announced to the
classes.
"Y" EMPLOYMENT SECRETARY
PLACED 812 MEN IN APRIL
Many Jgbs Open for Men Who Can
Work During May; Names of
More Applicants Wanted
Work has been given 312 men dur-
ing the month just passed. The report
of the employment secretary of the
University Y. M. C. A. shows that in
April, 227 were given odd Jobs, in-
cluding window washing, lawn mow-
ing, rug cleaning, and care of gar-
dens; 77 placed in board jobs; and
eight given steady employment other
than board.
Many odd jobs and a few board jobs

come into the office every day. Not
nearly enough names have been left
to fill the desired places and all men
that can work during the month of
May are asked to leave their names
and addresses as soon as possible. The
weather of the past month has held
up many kinds of work that would
otherwise have been available and the
number of jobs during May is expected
to be a great increase over the num-
ber in April.
TWO DOUGHBOYS HAVE UNIQUE
EXPERIENCE; ENDS TRAGICALLY
Coblenz, May 3 (Correspondence of
the Associated Press) .-Two Ameri-
can soldiers who went ahead of the
Army of Occupation during its march
across Rhenish Prussia last Decem-
ber, donned German army uniforms
and had a series of thrilling adven-
tures, after a court martial recently,
were sentenced to 20 years at hard
labor. The men, both privates, were
charged with desertion in addition to
eight other offenses connected with
their run-away trip.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10.3o A. M. Communion Service.
6.oo P. M. Prof. T. E. Rankin begins a series of Bible studies
in the parlors of the church from 6 to 6:30. All Young
People are cordially invited.
6:30 P. M. Young Pe le's Evening Service.
TONIGHT
Miss Blanche Hart
Superintendent of the Detroit United Jewish Charities
SPEAKS ON
SOCIAL SERVICE WORK
LANE HALL 8.P.M.
AUSPICES MENORAH SOCIETY

GIANT SEAPLANES START '
OCEAN TRIP NEXT WEEK
Commander Towers Refuses to State
What Date the Planes Will Leave
Rockaway Reach
New York, May 3.-The giant sea-
planes MC-1, MC .3 and MC-4 will "hop
off" from Rockaway Beach on the first
leg of the United States navy's Trans-
atlantic flight at 7 a. m. one day
"early next week," according to plans
announced tonight by Commander
John H. Towers, officer in charge of
the flight.
Commander Towers declined to fix a
more definite date for the present, ex-
plaining that he did not wish to be too
specific until every detail had been
arranged.
JOSEPHUS DANIELS IN FAVOR
OF SINKING GERMAN FLEET
London, May 3. -_ "The greatest
moral lesson of the war would be to
sink the entire German fleet with
proper ceremonies," Josephus Daniels,
American secretary of the navy, who
recently visited the captured German
vessels at Scapa Flow, declared in a
statement today to the Associated
Press.

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