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May 01, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR

a;

MICHIGAN DEFEAT5
YP5I NORMAL 5-3

Teachers Get to Glenn in
Inning, Managing to Put
Two Runs

the First
Across

SCREIDLER REPLACES GLENN
AND LUNDGREN'S MEN USE BAT
Four runs in the sixth inning gave
Michigan the long end of the 5-3 final
count in baseball match with Ypsi-
lanti held Wednesday afternoon on
Ferry field under the handicap of cold
damp weather conditions.
Glenn, who started on the mound for
the Wolverines, seemed unable to
warm up and abdicated in favor of
Scheidler in the fourth after the Nor-
mals\ had tocuhed his delivery for a
quartet of safeties and three runs.
Scheidler Tiakes Slab
Scheidler finished the last six inn-
ings with more perfect control and a.
few slants beyond the hitting vision
of the pedagogical batsmen.
Lundgren's outfit again showed
weakness with the club and found the
offering of Powers for five hits, two
of which fattened Huber's average.
The talkative catcher was in an un-
usually profitable mood and added
three stolen bases and one run to his
batting record of .500 for the after-
noon.
Powers, giving a worthy impression
of his hurling ability, must have seen
Knode work in the Indiana contest
last Saturday. The Michigan captain
was passed cleverly during his first
three trips to the plate. On the first
of these occasions he stretched his
gift into a talley. He later rivalled
Huber's base running prowess by
adding three stolen sacks.
Ypsi Bats Well
Fox proved himself the main cog
in the Ypsilanti run-getting force and
delivered clean safeties in his first
three chances with the bat.
Cooney, who worked for six innings
as the Teachers' backstop, was un-
able to hold Powers. He was replac-
ed by Bailey in the Maize and Blue
half of the seventh after taking credit
for three passed balls one of which
allowed Van Boven to score after his
double in the sixth.
Powers registered the opening hit
for the Normals in the first inning aft-
er Draper had been retired on strikes
and Hollway had been hit by a pitch-
ed ball. Carlson and Fox followed
with safeties which drove in Hollway
and Powers. Carlson was caught at
the plate. Morris fanned..

Senior engineers will report to
baseball practice at 3:30 o'clock
this afternoon at Ferry field.
Huber produced his first clean drive
and Knode drew his second pass but
scoring was cut short by the second
lucky double play by the Normals,
Thelan to Morris.
Mliehigan Runs Wild
The sixth proved Michigan's big inn-
ing. With two down, Van Boven con-
nected for a two bagger just beyond
the reach of the right fielder. Pow-
ers fumbled Froemke's grounder and
Van Boven took third. Froemke stole
second and crossed the pan for the
second run on Huber's hit. Karpus
felt Powers for the third safety of the
spree and scored a moment later with
Huber after Ypsi errors on Scheidler
and Knode. Cooper increased the pos-
sibilities by waiting for a walk. Gar-
rett struck out, ending the rally.
In the same inning Ypsilanti rec-
orded two hits by Fox and Morris but
failed to score.
Game Tightened
Pheney opened Michigan's seventh
with a clean slug to the outfield but
faileed to complete the circuit. Neith-
er team scored nor hit during the re-
mainder of the game.
The attendance was small in accord
with the frigid atmosphere. A slight'
rain earlier in the afternoon left doubt
in the minds of many as to whether
the long heralded and four times post-
poned match would really take place.

INTERCLASS BALL
TO BEGIN EARLY
Interclass baseball games will begin
next Saturday morning, Dr. George F.
May announced yesterday. It has been
found necessary to start the schedule
before the teams have had the usual
amount of practice, due to the unfav-
orable weather with which Ann Ar-
bor has been afflicted of late.
Three games will be played on Fer-
ry hield at 10 o'clock. The junior
medics play the fresh laws, the senior
lits play the junior lits, the senior
engineers play the junior engineers.
On Wednesday, May 7, at 4 o'clock,
the sophomore and freshman engin-
eers play and the sophomore and
freshman lits.
NINE COST MORE
IN '19 - BARTELME
According to Philip G. Bartelme,
director of athletics, the cost of
placing a baseball team on the field
this year will be increased 30 to 40
per cent. At the directors' meeting
held at Chicago last week this addi-
tional expense was discussed.
The government took over all of the
sporting goods factories at the be-
ginning of the war. They have been
returned to their owners, but the
prices will not be lowered until all of
the present orders have been filled.
Mr. Bartelie, looking into the fu-
ture, bought athletic supplies for two
years, at the former price. Howevery
traveling expenses have increased 25
per cent, and hotel accommodations
have increased 33 per cent this year.
Prices of practically eevry class of
sporting goods are from 10 to 50 per
cent higher than in, 1918, according
to a schedule just issued by one of
the largest manufacturers. The chief
reason advanced for this increase is
the 10 per cent war tax on all sport-
ing goods, which recently became ef-
fective, and the cost of material and
labor.
BOXING AND WRESTLING TO BE
ORGANIZED FOR FALL TERM
Although little was done in the way
of organized boxing and wrestling this
spring, much more extensive plans are
under way for instruction in the man-
ly arts during the next school year.
It is proposed to have some boxing
and wrestling expert come to the gym-
nasium from Detroit two or three days
a week and give individual instruc-
tion.
There will probably be a meeting at
the beginning of next semester of all
those interested to determine the num-
ber of men who would pay a reasona-
ble fee for professional tutoring.
There will be no boxing tournament
unless it is under the auspices of the
boxing club, Doctor May believes that
most of the men merely want to learn
to use their fists and not to give pub-
lic bouts.V

Conference Golf
Is NVajor Sport
Why hasn't the University a golf
team?
That is the question which has been
asked more and more frequently of
late. This year the spirit for the game
has attained such proportions as to
make what many call only the annual
"fuss" about the matter seriously con-
sidered.
Until Michigan left the Conference
in 1905, this University was always
represented by a chaipion golf team.
Only one match had ever been lost.
In spite of this brilliant record, when
the Conference was again entered, this
branch of sport was the only one
which was not immediately taken up.
Other Big Ten universities are turn-
ing out golf' teams which are bring-
ing many honors to their schools. En-
thusiasni is particularly high in the
University of Chicago, the University
of Minnesota and Northwestern Uni-
versity. At these schools the game is
recognized as a major sport. - Courses
are either secured by the university
athletic authorities or official arrange-
ments are made with some local club
for the use of its course.
Every eastern university of note
possesses a golf team and many men
who are ardent enthusiasts have been
(Continued on Page Four)
The Daily sees all and knows all.
Let it be your guide.-Adv.
"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS"

American League
Chicago, 9; Detroit, 7.
Philadelphia, 3; New York, 5.
Cleveland, 4; St. Louis, 2.

The Latest
Popular Hits and Dance Numbers
Vocal and Instrumental Classics
by Victor Artists

h

YESTERDAY'S GAMES

Boston, 6; Washington,1.
National League
New York, 5; Boston, 2.
St. _Louis, 0; Chicago, 4.
Brooklyn, 9; Philadelphia, 9. (19 inn
ings -- darkness.)
Cincinnati-Pittsburg (postponed).

5

.Announcing the Arrival

of the

VICTOR RECORDS

for MAY

i

at the

UnIirit Atfb2fIusfc lbouse

Utilts and zt aparb

I

Miclilgan
P.s. A.B. R.

COUSINS & HALL

Player

H. P.O. A. E.I

Knode .......2b
Cooper .......f.
Garrett......c.f.
Pheney.....r.f.
Van Boven ..s.s.
Froemke ....1b
Huber.......c.
Karpus ......3b
Glenn......,.p
Scheidler ....p

1
4
4
4
3
3'
3
3
1
1

1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
1
0
2
1
0
0

1
1
1
3
1
10
9
1
0
0

4
'0
0
0
2
0
2
2
1
2

1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

I

I

Our Supply of Records is Limited
because of trade conditions
Only the early visitor can
choose from a large selection.

Members Florists Telegraph Delivery

i

m

m

Totals ........27 5 5 27 11 2

Pri
Re

Dces

Player
Draper ..
Hollway
Powers
Carlson,.
Fox.....
Morris
Lawler ...
Laupke
Thalan
(Cooney .
Bailey ..

Ypsilanti Normal
Pos. A.B. R. It.
....3b 4 0 0
...r.f. 2 1 0
p..p 3 2 1
...s.s. 3 0 1
...l.f. 4 0 3
....lb 4 0 1
...c.f. 4 0 0
....2b 1 0 0
....2b 3 0 0
c. 0 0
.... c. 0 0 0

P.O. A.
1 2
1 0
2 4
2 1
0 0
9 0
0 0
0 1
3 3
0 0
w 0

CLT Highest
CLOT ING uality

E.
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
01
0
0
0

duced on

No old stocks to unload. Every garment in
the store is new 1919 style and thus while
you
Save Several Dollars
on Your Spring Suit
you buy as smart and snappy garments as
any dealer can offer. Here are a few features:
-WAIST-SEAM MODELS
-ALL PURE WOOL FABRICS
-TAILORING OF HIGHEST QUALITY
-SMART COLORS
--NOVELTY PATTERNS

Knode Scores
Knode who reached first on balls,
managed to round the diamond while
Cooper and Garrett were attempting to
reach the initial sack on infield
grounders. Pheney was called out on
a third play of the same type.
Ypsilanti failed to reach first in the
second. Van Boven was called safe in
the same session on Powers' error and
reached second on Froemke's sacrifice.
Huber landed safe through Carlson's
slip and Van Boven reached third.
Huber took his first steal leaving run-
hers on the advanced positions with
one out. On the next play Karpus
flied out to Powers who completed a
double play on Van Boven at third
thus getting himself out of the hole.
Normals Adds Run
During the Teachers' section of the
third one hit and one run were an-
nexed. Carlson who reached first on
error and rounded the circuit, was
caught at the ;late on an attempted
double steal. Michigan failed to come
through in this inning and neither
team scored in the fourth.
Ypsilanti fell three in; a row before
Scheidler in the fifth.

Totals ........31 3 6 20 11 4

Innings - 1
Ypstl......2
Michigan ..1

23456
0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 4

7
0
0

8'
0f
0

9-R.H.E.
0-3 6 4
x-5 5 2

Two base hits, Van Boven; stolen
bases, Knode 3, Huber 3, Froemke 1,
Scheidler 1; sacrifice hits, Froemke,
Scheidler; double plays, Powers-Drap-'
er; Sholen-Morris; base on balls,
Glenn 1, Scheidler 1, Powers 5; hits,
Glenn 6; Powers 5; hit by pitcher,
Powers 2; struck out, Glenn 5, Scheid-
ler 4, Powers 8; wild pitch, Glenn 2;
winning pitcher, Scheidler; losing
pitcher, Powers.
Coach _Folwell has been elected to
carry the Pennsylvania eleven through
the 1919 season. This is Coach Fol-
well's third season with Pennsy.
Football practice will be held
at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon
at Ferry field.

WOMEN'S BASEBALL LEAGUE
STARTS ITS SCHEDULE TODAY
The schedule for the games of the
women's baseball league is as follows:
Thursday, May 1-Chi Omega vs.
Kappa Alpha Theta.
Friday, May 2-Alpha Phi vs. Pi Beta
Phi.
Tuesday, May 5-Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma vs. Newberry.
Thursday, May 8-Collegiate Sorosis
vs. Gamma Phi Beta.
All games will be played at 5 o'clock
in the afternoon in the}baseball field
across from Barbour gymnasium. The
teams must appear at the time sched-
uled or they will forfeit the game.
After losing two games, a team is au-
tomatically put out of the running.
Watch the ally for the second schedule
of games to be played later.

and the saving will surprise you.

Especially

it you nave priced at otner stores. rroM
HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS, HOSE, UNDER-
WEAR, all fine quality, reduced.... . .0l

96

Come to Corbett's at any time for clothing and fur-
nishings at lowest prices.

Tomn

Corbett

116 E. Liberty, between Main and 4th Ave.

I

Telepathy

Spanish Bull Fight

Toe Dancing

Friday

Tickets from

All Nation Hullabaloo

Wahr's

8 p.m.

WITH CAMPUS STARS

Sheehan's

HILL AUDITORIUM

10 ACTS

35 cents

Slater's

Hawaiian Music

Chinese Magic Stunts

Jazz

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