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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE WEA

ETHERI

,PROBABLY RAIN
I TODAY

c r fr 3a1 iatli

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIIRE
SEll ICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 147.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1919.

PRICE THREE

ENGINEERS DESIRE
PRELIMINARYORK
IN LIT COLLEGE
GROWING DEMAND FOR BROAD
EDUCATION RESPONSIBLE
FOR CHANGE
DEAN BUTTS ENDORSES
NEW COURSE OF STUDY
Two Committees Have Been Appointed
to Discuss Advisability of This
Scheme
Engineers taking work in the lit-
erary college is a possibility if the
two committees, one appointed by the
engineering college and the other by
the literary college, are able to form
a satisfactory working agreement.
This means that the engineers
might be required to take literary
work on just the same basis as that
required of the laws and medics. Sev-
eral plans are under advisement as to
how and when to require this work.
A.Several Plans Considered
One method Is that of taking a one
or two year course before taking up
engineering work. Another is that of
engineers taking a year of graduate
work in the literary college, and the
third is that of making the work op-
tional; that is advising students to
take a one or, two year couse before
the engineering work, but not making
it a requirement.
Deans Out of City
As yet the personnel of the two com-
mittees to inyestigate and report the
feasibility of such a scheme is not
known because both Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley and Dean John R. Effinger
are out 'of the city. Members of the
engineering faculty are in favor of the
change, because they recognize the
growing demand of the world for en-
gineers, and in norder to supply this
demand satisfactorily it is necessary
for an engineer to have more than a
general knowledge of cultural sub-
jects.
Engineer Must Meet Demand
"There was once a time when an en-
gineer could carry on his work by is-
olating himself from the public eye and
in no way being concerned with peo-
ple, but with the change of conditions
it became necessary for engineers to
occupy a prominent part," said As-
sistant Dean Butts, engineering college.
'OUTDOOR CONCERT BY
VRITYBAND FRIDAY
Playing old Michigan songs, the Var-
sity band will open its season in Ann
Arbor with the first of a series of
open air concerts from the campus
band stand, weather permitting, at 7
o'clock Friday evening.
During the past four months a week-
ly rehearsal has been held and in this
time the perfect technique of the
band, which has thrilled audiences in
Chicago, Saginaw, and Detroit, has
been brought out. Only twice before
this year in Ann Arbor has the band
given a public concert and these were
only brief ones: once before leaving
for Chicago, an donce for the Liberty
loan.
Rehearsal Wednesday night showed
that the band was in excellent form,
and up to the standard, set on their
trips.

f

LIT INVITATIONS
UNIQUE THIS YEAR
Special pains have been taken this
year to make the Commencement in-
vitations of the senior literary cla
distinctive.
The cover, of mottled green and
brown leather, with an oxidized bronze
plate of the old Library tower is ex-
pected to elicit more than the usual
number of orders. A rotogravure of
a Huron island scene is found on the
frontispiece, other pages containing
rotogravures of the Michigan Union
and the new Library.
Not dnly does the invitation serve
as an announcement of Commence-
ment week, but is a directory of all
students graduating in June and at
the close of Summer session.
Orders will be taken for the invi-
tations from 8 to 10 o'clock, and from
1 to 3:30 o'clock Thursday and Fri-
day by Sherwald W. Sedgwick, '19,
chairman of the invitation committee,
in the waiting room of Dean Effinger's
office. The price is 50 cents for the
invitations, and 10 cents for the an-
nouncements, payable at the time the
orders are given. No orders will be
accepted later than Friday afternoon.
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR BIG DINNER
Plans for the complimentary Rick-
enbacker dinner to be given at 6
o'clock Saturday were given out in
detail to the Aero club at its meeting
last night in the Union.
Tickets may be obtained from the
Aero club members or at the Union.
Admission will be limited to Aero club
and Union members.
Selfridge field officers have been in-
vited to attend. There is a possi-
bility they may come by airplane.
LATER - Owing to unavoidable
events unforeseen by the committee
in charge, Rickenbacker will be unable
t attend the banquet at the Union
Saturday night, according to a long
distance telephone call from him late
last night. Money for the tickets will
be refunded by the Aero club.
PAYMENT OF DUES
URGENT--LUNDQUIST
All senior fits who have not paid
their class dues will have an oppor-
tunity to do so Thursday. The class
treasurer will be in the corridor of
University hall from 8 until 5 o'clock
and all dues must be paid at that time
because of the expenses that are now
accruing for the activities of the class
especially during the coming com-
mencement week.
The $4.50 assessment constitutes all
the expenses for the year. It is unus-
ually small compared with those of
former years some of which were as
high as $10. If the dues are all
promptly settled up the different com-
mittees will- be able to complete their
plans commencement week.
Among the various events for which
the money must be raised as soon as
possible are the Promenade, class day
festivities, printing of the souvenirs,
the several mixers, and the dinner
dance that are being planned by the
(Continued on Page Six)

WOMAN TO UPHOLD
U. OF M. AGAIN IN'
ORATORY CONTEST

JAPS GET KIAO CHAU TEMPORARILY;
RIFT APPEARS IN ITALIAN CLOUDS

VOICE+

OF ARMENIA" - TITLE OF
MISS HOELZLE'S
m A T.72-

TA.L
PROF. TRUEBLOOD TO
OFFICIATE AS JUDGE
Michigan's Representative Expected
to Make Good Showing in
Spite of Illness
Accompanied by Prof. T. C. True-
blood, Alice M. Hoelzle, '19, Michigan's
representative in the Northwestern
Oratorical league contest, will leave at
1:16 o'clock this afternoon for Evans-
ton, Ill., where the contest is to be
held.
Professor Trueblood, known as the
"father of the Northern Oratorical
league," since he founded it here in
1890, will preside at this contest, the
29th in the history of the league.
It was feared for some time that
Miss Hoelzle would be unable to rep-
resent the University. She came out
of the hospital last Monday after suf-
fering from an illness due to over-
work. For the last day or two she
has been rehearsing quietly, however.
Wednesday afternoon she was given a
hearing before a few friends, at which
she seemed to speak with her old time
vigor. She is expected to acquit her-
self creditably at the contest Friday
evening.
Miss Hoelzle will present the same
speech, "The Voice of Armenia," with
which she won honors in the Univer-
(Continued on Page Six)
BULL FIGHT EXPECTED
TO .STARTLE, AUDIENCE
HULLABALOO PROGRAM RANGES
FROM MYSTERY TO
MUSIC
Can you imagine a bull-fight in Hill
auditorium?
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
say there will be one on the program
for "The All-Nation Hullabaloo," which
they are presenting at 8 o'clock to-
morrow night. Although bull-fighting
as a means of diversion has been ta-
booed in this country, special dispen-
sation has been made in this case due
to the fact that the matador is a vet-
eran and therefore little likely to per-
mit of the bulls becoming dangerous.
Spanish Bull Fighters Here
Banderilleros for the occasion are
Senors Cuevas, Diaz, and Arguelles;
picador, Sr. Beckwith; matador, Sr.
Vazquez; and toros, Srs. Grunwaldt
and Mourgher. The affair will be giv-
en before a high government official
of Spain and stakes are said to be
running high.
Deep Mystery from China
Of equal brilliance on the "Hulla-
baloo' program will be. a mystifying
(Continued on Page Six)

(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 30-The Chinese-Jap-
anese dispute over the disposition un-
der the peace treaty of the former Ger-
man fortress of Kiao Chau has been
settled, it was announced this after-
noon. The understanding is that the
plan is to give the fortress to Japan
by the terms of the treaty, but with
an arrangement for its return to China
under certain conditions within a stip-
ulated time.
Paris, April 30. - In the Ital-
ian cloud there is a slight rift which
gives hope of the clearing of the dif-
ficulties that have arisen in the peace
conference over the Adiratic problem.
Overtures for the resumption of rela-
tions have not come thus far from
either direction but there are intima-
tions from Rome that overtures from
Paris would not be unacceptable and
would receive every attention.

Paris, April 30.-,Plans for launch-
ig the League of Nations were fairly
definitely outlined at a luncheon which
Col. E. M. House gave today to Sir
James Eric Drummond, the secretary-
general of the league, Lord Robert
Cecil, and others..
The plans are divided into three
main stages: first, preparatory details
which will be worked out at head-
quarters to be established at London
during the coming summer; second,
the inaugural meeting of the league
at Washington next October under the
presidency of Woodrow Wilson;
third, the permanent establishment of
the league at Geneva next fall or win-
ter.
The preparatory details will begin
soon after the signing of the treaty
and will be in the hands of the com-
mittee of nine designated by Presi-
dent Wilsons resolution before the
last plenary session of the conference.

OFFICIAL EXPLAINS
NEW PENSi-ON PLAN
Teachers Being on Salary Must Have
Means of Support After
Retirement
IF HEALTH FAILS WILL GET
TWO-THIRDS OF AMOUNT
Detailed explanations of the differ-
ent phases of the Carnegie founda-
tion's new retiring allowance plan
which was recently adopted by the
Board of Regents, were given yesterday
at a meeting of the members of the
several faculties by Henry S. Pritch-
ett, president of the foundation.
"Since the university teacher is on
a fixed salary," said President Pritch-
ett, "he must have some means or in-
come after his retirement from active
teaching with which to take care of
himself and family. The Carnegie
foundation for the advancement of
teaching supplies this source of pro-
tection for the teacher once he has
reached the age of 65, providing a con-
tract with the foundation is entered-
into."
In the adoption of the new plan, the
University has required that partici-
pation to the extent of five per cent
of the salary paid to the instructor be
made a condition of University service
in the case of all members of the fac-
ulties appointed after the end of this
academic year, and who would be elig-
ble to participation ifi the plan offered
by the foundation; that the University
begin its contribution as soon as the
teacher becomes a contributor; and
that the University contribute the
same proportion of the salary as the
teacher does, namely, five per cent, it
being understood that the University
and the teacher contribute the same
percentage up to a fixed maximum of
$5,000, beyond which the University
will not contribute.
If a teacher, on account of his fail-
ing health, is forced to resign from
the University, the foundation plan
provides that if the teacher has al-
(Continued on Page Six)

MAI. DURKEE GOES
TO FORT WAYNE

Commanded Army Training
Last Fall at Request Flied
Board of Regents

Corps
by

EXPECTS FINAL DISCHARGE
WILL ARRIVE IN SHORT TIME
Major R. H. Durkee, commandant
of the S. A. T. C., left yesterday for
Fort Wayne, where he will receive his
final discharge.
Major Durkee came to Ann Arbor to
command the mechanical training
units which started in the University
April 15, 1918. He then held the com-
mission of captain.
Last fall when the S. A. T. C; was
formed the University Regents asked
that Durkee be retained. The re-
quest was granted and the 3,000 men
in the S. A. T. C. came under his com-
mand as well as the 800 men in the
mechanical section which became
known as section B of the S. A. T. C.
Later in the fall he was commis-
sioned major. After the demobiliza-
tion of the corps Major Durkee was
kept here to close the business of his
command.
Seniors To Wear
Gowns At Dance
A new senior activity will be in-
stituted for the first time at 2.30
o'clock Saturday afternoon in the form
of a Swing-out dance in Barbour gym-
nasium.
Under the auspices of the senior
lits the affair will include a four piece
orchestra, special features during in-
termissions, some old style dances
including the circle two step, Virginia
reel, and square dances, and refresh-
ments. Although the dance is spon-
sored by the lits all other seniors are
invited, the only stipulation being that
caps and gowns must be worn when
entering. jGames of different kinds
(Continued on Page Six)

POSTAL OFFiCIAL
T ATMhREIGN OF TERROR
COUNTRY-WIDE DEMONSTRATION
BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN
PLANNED
16 IOMBS DISCOVERED
IN N. Y. POST OFFICE
Infernal Machines Addressed to Prom-
Inent Citizens; Several Men
Escape Narrowly
(By Associated Press)
New York, April 30.-Sixteen bombs
in parcel post packages addressed to
16 prominent men, each containing
sufficient dynamite to blow the ad-
dressee to pieces, were discovered
among the mail at the general post
office here today.
A preliminary investigation con-
vinced the post office authorities that
they had unearthed a country-wide
plot of terrorists to assassinate high-
ly placed persons as a demonstration
on May 1.
Inquiry Started
A sweeping inquiry by postal in-
spectors, agents of the department of
justice, and police experts, was be-
gun at once into the activities of
anarchists and "reds" in this city
At the same time a warning was
issued by the district attorney's office
to all .public officials, especially judg-
es, to exercise care in receiving mail.
Addresses Typewritten
The addresses on the. 16 packages
seized were all typewritten. The style
and a couple of minor errors led of-
ficials to believe that the addressing
was done by a foreigner. In the lot
were packages addressed to Mitchell
A. Palmer, U. S. attorney-general;
Anthony Caminetti, commissioner of
immigration; William B. Wilson, sec-
'retary of labor; William H. Lamar,
solicitor-general; and A. S. Burleson,
postmaster-general, at Washington.
Others were addressed to Mayor Hy-
tan and Police Commissioner Enright
of New York, Governor Sproul of
Pennsylvania, John D. Rockefeller,
and J. P. Morgan.
The 16 packages were mailed Satur-
day night. They had the correct post-
age for the parcel post but were seal-
ed with red wafers and therefore
lacked postage to carry them first
class.
Gadsden, Ala., April 30.-Represen-
tative John L. Burnett, chairman of the
ifimigration committee of the last
house, narrowly escaped serious in-
jury or death today by an infernal
machine received through the mails.
The lid on the package. stuck when
Mr. Burnett attempted to open it. His
(Continued on Page Six)
APPOINTMENT OF MANAGERS
OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Appointments of managing ed-
itors and business managers of
the following student publica-
tions will be made within the
next two weeks by the Board in
Control of Student Publications:
The Michigan Daily,
The Inlander,
The Michiganensian,
The Gargoyle,
The Students' Directory,

The Athletic Program,
The Wolverine.
Any student wishing to apply
for any of these positions should
send his application in writing
to Prof. E. R. Sunderland, Law
building, wit- a statement. of his
experience and qualifications for
the place. All of these positions
carry salaries.

THE CERCLI FRANCAIS PRESENTS

OS

I

TIMES"~

CORRECTIONS MUST BE IN
Lists of names for the Mich-
iganensian mnay be corrected if
the copy is at the offices not later
than tonight. No other copy or
corrections will be accepted.

MODERN FRENCH COMEDY
SARAH CASWELL ANCELL HALL

+OORS OPEN AT 7:30

.CURTAIN RISES AT 8 SHARP TICKETS AT THE DOOR

i

V

t,

:1

Thne moving pic-
tures of actual air
battles and de-
struction of G ear-

"Eddie" Rickenbacher
The American Ace of Aces
HILL AUDITORIUM SATURDAY, MAY 3, 8 p. m.
Seats on sale now at Wahr's and Sheehan's

Limited Number
Reserved Seats
$1.50, $1.00
All Other Seats

_.
..

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