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April 29, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. ..._...r.... ........ .-......-- -

HAP'S GOING ON

II

FRENCH PLAY READY,
FOR DRESS REHEARSAL

SPIRIT HIGH FOR
VICTORY REUNION.

ADDITIONAL SPORTS

I

PONTIAC STUDENTS TO FORM o'clock tonight in Lane hall. This
SECTIONAL CLUB TUESDAY I meeting is the first of a series called
by the University Y. M. C. A. for the
For the purpose of forming an or- promotion of sectional clubs.
ganization which shall be active in -
boosting Michigan, the men students The Information Bureaus. - The
from Pontiac will hold a meeting at 7 Daily.-Adv.

5 ;

I

TODAY
)0-Varsity football practice on Fer.
ry field.
)0-Pontlac club meets in Lane hall
00-Fort Sheridan officers meet in
New Union.
00--Student council meeting in new
Union.
& ANGELL MAKES CLEAR
HIS STAND ON ATHLETICS
(Continued from Page One)
dinary college professor can justly
.vy. If then, education has as one of
s main objectives character, as we
e fond of saying, let us recognize the
et that no single member of the fac-
ty is so likely to contribute a deep
Ld lasting influence to the college
neration as the bead of the athletic
partment."
The above paragraph which includes
r. Angell's attitude toward the coach
as omitted from the Detroit paper's
port of this speech, and as a result
.e Detroit paper had little trouble in
aagining that Dr. Angell would ini-
ate a regime in which Mr. Yost would
3 dismissed.

ACTION OF PLAY IS FULL
AMUSING SITUA-
TIONS

OF

Alumni Plan To Be Back In Forge For
Great Celebration in
;Jub
'69 WILL BE ON HAND FOR
SEMI-CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY

Dress rehearsal for the French play
of the Cercle Francais, "Nos In-
times," which is to be presented at 8
o'clock Thursday evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, will be held to-
morrow evening. Mr. Everett L.
Hackes, the director, declares that allf
the work in connection with the per-
formance has been running smoothly.
The program is written entirely in
French, save for the short synopsis of
the play in English that Mr. Hackes
has prepared. One of the interestingj
features of the' program is the list of
all the plays presented by the Cercle
since 1907. Last year, "Le Retour
Imprevu" by Regnard and "L'Avocat
Patelin" by Brueys and Palapret were
presented.
The play itself belongs to the lighter
school of French comedy, abounding
in laughable situations and dialogue,
which, even to a person who under-
stands only a limited amount of the
language, are exceedingly funny. The
second and third acts, especially, are
full of action. The scene of the play
is laid at Ville d'Avray, near Paris.
During the intermissions, Marjorie
West, of the School of Music, will sing
three solos in French.
Tickets for the performance are on
sale from 2 to 4 o'clock at Wahr's
bookstore. The prices are 50 and 75
cents and $1. Associate members of
the Cercle will receive a reduction of
50 cents on their tickets.
SENIOR LITS LEVY
LIGHT CLASS TAX

Frfom all indications and early re-
ports, the Victory reunion planned
for this June will equal in size and
spirit any previous alumni gathering.
Mr. Wilfred B. Shaw, the general
secretary, has heard definitely from
the representatives of 21 classes that
will meet from- June 22 to 26. The
following are the ones that will surely
be on hand: '66M, '69, '72, '73, '79, '83,
'89, '94, '94M, '94L, '94D, '02, '03, '04,
'04L, '05, '07E, '09, '10, '16L, and '17.
'69 Holds Semi-Centennial
The cemi-centennial of '69 and the
quarter centennial of '94 are two of
the' most noteworthy reunions. 'lie
first editio'n of Reunion News, the of-
ficial bulletin of '94, has been sent out
to all members of the class. It is ex-
pected that the Phi Delta Phi house will
be used as a home and general head-
quarters of this class during their
stay in Ann Arbor. Forty-three indi-
viduals have already signified their in-
tention of returning.
Although '73 held a reunion last
year, they voted unanimously to hold
their next meeting in June of 1919.
Half of the 82 members of this class
are still living. A large number of the
40 remaining in the class of '79 are
expected to be here in June. This
will be their fortieth year out of col-
lege.
'04L Has Extensive Plans
Extensive plans are being made for
the fifteenth graduation anniversay of
'04L. A "big feed" will be held at the
Union where each graduate vxll have
three minutes in which to tell his life

SWIMMERS TO WORK
FOR FUTURE TEAM
Coach Drulard of the swimming
team has issued a call for swimmers
for the prospective Michigan tank
squad.
Men reporting will practice at the
Y. M. C. A. pool Wednesdays at 3
o'clock and Saturdays at 10 o'clock.
On account of the limited se of the
pool most attention will be paid to div-
ing and sprints.
It is lamentable that Michigan has
not greater facilities at the present
time for training a swimming team
and that the coach will not be able to
teach men to swim. However, any man
who has done any diving or swimming
against competition should report and
will be given what coaching he needs.
Every one who witnessed the unof-
ficial meet with the Detroit Athletic
club's star aquatic team was more
than satisfied with the showing made
by Michigan's team. The contest ac-
complished more than one thing. It
proved that there was latent talent in
Michigan that could be developed into
first class material. White showed
good form in the diving, getting a bet-
ter score than Briggs who holds the
state championship in fancy diving

I
t

IParker and Conklin,

LITTLE GRANDMOTHER IS
VICTIM OF CZAR'S TYRANNY
(Continued from Page One)
,s a peasant. The government made
trenuous efforts to seize her, but in
ain. She continued thus until, in
904, she visited the United States to
nlist financial aid for the cause.
Again Imprisoned
Returning to her country, she was
arrested andtkept in solitary confine-
ment for a year and then shipped once
nore to remote Siberia. There she
'emained for eight years, until, in
.917, the government of the Czar was
>verthrown and she was set free.
WORK OF BEAUTIFYING UNION
LAWN COMPLETED IN JUNE

from the ten foot board, the
verine sprinters gave the D.
men close competition.

Wol-
A. C

.

"By commencement time at the lat-
est, the -lawn and shrubbery in front
>f the Union building will be in fine
shape," said Homer L. Heath, secre-
ary of the Union, Monday.
The walk on State street is now
fringed with a double row of thorned
barberry bushes that have been kept
from last year. When the new en-
rance way is finished the lawn will,
be graded and seeded and the plots
at the side of the building will soon
be gone over by the workmen.
N. Y. Peace League Committee Chosen"
New York, April 28.-The New York{
committee of the League to Enforcel
Peace has been'organized with Herbert
Parsons as chairman, it was announc-
d today.

The finance committee of the senior
literary class has decided that an as-
sessment of $4.50 from each member
shall be collected either Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday of this week.
This tax will be divided as follows:
$1 for the memorial fund; $2 for the
social fund; 25 cents for the class sec-
retary; and $1.25 for miscellaneous ex-
penses. The class treasurer will be at
the booth opposite the Registrar's of-
fice in University hall to collect money
from 8 to 4 o'clock on these days. All
back dues should also be paid at this
time.
It is said that this year's assess-
ment is much smaller than in previous
years, the tax for some classes hav-
ing gone as high as $10. The finance
committee urges all senior lits to pay
at once so that the various class com-
mittees will have something definite on
which to work.
Patronize our aavertisers.-Adv.

i

?talA- .IrsCoer
TRADC MARK .RCt ,US.PAT, AN.

Forerunners of Spring
if you would know what will be the vogue in Foot-
wear this Spring, you can find the answer in our win-
dow, and in the new models placed on display daily.
Oxfords will be the dominant note in Womens foot-
wear and among one of the popular are these

history since entering "the wide, wide
world."
Many other classes are expected to
be heard from within the next few
weeks.
"HLLBAO" BRINGS
BACK OLD FAVORITES
Jubilant, jingling, Jazz will be joy-
ously juggled by "The All-American
Octette" at "The All-Nation Hullaba-
loo," which the Cosmopolitan club is
presenting Friday night in Hill audi-
torium.
"Abe" Gornetzky at the piano leaves
little to be desired, but just for good
measure there will be added Messrs.
,Buehrer, Riker, Fred Zierer, Cecil
Rhodes, Don Rhodes, Paul Wilson, and
Jack Gardner. Song interpretations
will be given by Knight Mirrielees, of
"Come On, Dad" fame.
"Frenzied Fingers" will be demon-
strated by a genuine Hawaiian quar-
tet, who are past masters when it
comes to the ukelele and guitar. Car-
los Zanelli, who- so effectively pro-
logued the 1919 Union Opera, is billed
on the program as "The Chilean Trou-
badour," and Max Jaslou will feature ,
a dramatic sketch, "The 'Vagabonds."
Nilkranth Chavre, Hindoo mystic,
will present a startling turban act, of
the kind for which his countrymen are
famous. Mr. Chavre's home is in
Shahupuri, Kolhapur, India. The terp-
sichorean feature of the program will
be Miss Jeanette Kruzka, who will pre-
sent several dance interpretations.
Tickets for the "Hullabaloo"~ are
now on sale at Wahr's, Slater's, and
Sheeha n's.
GLEE CLUB WANTS TRYOUTS
FOR ASSISTANT !T ANAGERSHIPS
Sophomore and freshman tryouts
are wanted for the! assist ant manager-
ships of the Varsity (lee and Mando-
lin club. Apply to the manager,
Charles R. Osius, Jr., '20, between
2:30 and 3:30 this afternoon at room
1, Press building.
Get your Daily subscription at once
amid' get the full benefit of the reduc-
ed price.--$1.00.-Adv.
HELP WANTED? Let The Daily
aid you and the result will be evi-
dent.-Adv.

BASEBALL SCORES
American League
Chicago-Detroit, postponed.
Cleveland-St. Louis, postponed.
Philadelphia, 2; New York, (12 in-
nings).
Boston, 6; Washington, 5.
National League
St. Louis-Chicago, postponed.*
New York, 5; Boston, 4.
Pittsburg-Cincinnati, postponed.
Brooklyn, 10;_Phil delphia, 1.
ACE OF ACES HAS
LONG BEEN IDOL
Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, Amer-
ican Ace of Aces, who will "tell of his
adventures in the "Arena of the Skies"
in Hill auditorium Saturday, has been
officially credited with 26 German
planes and unofficially with more
than 50.
He was the commanding officer of
the 94th air squadron, which is prob-
ably better known as the Hat in the
Ring squadron because of the insignia
painted on the sides of the squadron's
ships. This was the only flying unit
assigned to the Army of Occupation
into Germany. The squadron has 69
Hun planes to its credit.
Captain Rickenbacker was an idol
of the auto racing public long before
this country entered the war and it
proved to be a live newspaper story
when he enlisted in the army and be-
come General Pershing's chauffeur in
Franye. After a short time he receiv-
ed his transfer to the air service.
Rickenbacker's lecture will include
the complete story of his adventures
in the air and will be illustrated by
pictures which he obtained from Ger-
man officers and men of his own com-
mand.
Tickets are on sale at Wahr's and
Sheehan's.
Hailer's Army Aids Polish Victors
Geneva, April 28.-The Polish agency
it Lausanne states that some units of
General Haler's army, which left
France last week for Poland by the
way of Germany, participate in the
capture of Vilna from the Bolsheviki
'by Polish troops.

P

AT
Quarry Drug Cops
.Prescription Drug Store
COB. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 308
When you need Supplies -
Call us up. We can supply your wants in
any quantity. You can't beat the quality
of our coffee. Neither can you equal the
price. We can't prove it if you don't try us.
Kyer & Whitker
Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new lilm- of
PARIS FASHIONS
Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses

Newest materials, newest models, newest

colorings,

and

. ea rini

lowest prices
WHITE FLANNEL
TROUSERS
For
MAY SECOND
We have a full line of sizes for
your approval.
Tinker & Company
Cldthiers, Furnishers and Hatters
342 S. State St., at William;St.

Fountain

Pens

Brown Kid
Southern Tie
Note the beautiful arch
the long thin fore part
and the popular one
eyelet Colonial effect.
Price $10.00

1'

w

At

Also black Ooze forepart with satin back
alk - Over Boot Shop
115 S. MAIN ST.

MON ROE
ARROW
COLLAR
FOKSPRING
Cued, ?eabody &Co.Inc. Tr1oyAY

1

}

c

__. __ _ i!

FRESHMENI

SOPHOMORESI

JUNIORS!

SENIORS!

E

R

IS NOW ON SALE AT STATE STREET AND SOUTH UNIVERSITY STORES
STORIES! ARTICLESI POEMS!

CENTS

20 CE

.S

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