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April 29, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
TODA'!

t'L

AdL
AqW
liitr4t M rn

Itaixj

PRO I E
DA T AND NIGHT WIRF
SER VICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 145. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

LEGUE COVENNT
ADOPTED WITHOUT
DIVISION, CHANGE
CONSTITUTION MOVED BY WIL-
SON; BRITON NAMED AS FIRST I
SECRETARY-GENERAL
TAX EQUALITY CLAUSE;
NOT INCLUDED IN TEXT1
French and Nipponese Amendments
Left for Consideration by
League Itself
(By Associated Press) '
Paris, April 28. - The revised cov-
enant of the League of Nations was
adopted at 5:17 o'clock this afternoon
by the plenary session of the peace
conference without division and with-
out amendment. The covenant had
been moved by President Wilson.
The President said it was not neces-
sary to emphasize the significance of
the great covenant and the hopes en-;
teftained that the conference of the
nations of the world would maintain
justice in their international rela-
tions.]
Representatives to Committee
The President moved that the pow-
a name representatives to form a
c mmittee of nine to prepare plans
for the league and to establish the '
sept of it. Sir Eric Drummond of
Gveat Britain has been named as the7
first secretary-general of the league,'
the President announced. Regarding]
the composition of the pxecutive coun-_
cil he said Belgium, Brazil, Greece and]
Spain, in addition to the five great]
powers, would be represented on the
council until a permanent choice had'
been made.]
Japanese Amendment
Baron lakino, head of the Japanese]
delegation, who spoke after Presidenta
Wilson, moyed the Japanese amend-
ment on racial equality. Hesaid it'
was a race question with the possi-
bility of becoming acute. The equali-
ty of nations, he asserted, should be a]
fundamental principle of the league.'
Regret of Nipponese'
The Japanese statesman added that]
he felt it his duty to voice the regret]
of the Japanese delegation over the
failure of the League of Nations com-
mittee to do justice to the Japanese]
demand, which was based on a deep-'
rooted national conviction. Baron
Makino announced that the effort
would be continued to have the racial]
equality principle adopted as a part
of the covenant.
TLatiAmerian View
Chairman Acevedo of the Uruagalan
delegation said he saw in the league
a great aid to the realization of Latin-
American industrial and commercialj
prosperity..
Leon Bourgeois, former premier,
spoke for France. He said that the]
French amendments to the league, in-
cluding a demand for an international"
army and police force and the limita-
tion and verification of armaments of
all nations, had not been adopted.]
France, however, would sign the pact,
he declared.
Amendments Withdrawn'
The Japanese and French amend-
ments were withdrawn and it is un-
derstood that they have been left for
decision by the League of Nations it-
self. The text of the labor principles
for insertion in the treaty was adopted

and the conference adjoined without
considering responsibilities.
M. Clemenceau announced the with-
drawal of the amendments and Presi-
dent Wilson's proposal that the cov-
enant be adopted was carried. There
was, not more than a moment's pause,
in the honor of the league of nations
creation. When the decision was tak-
en President Wilson was surrounded
by delegates and friends who congrat-
ulated him on the constitution of the
league which he had steered past many
quicksands.

1919-20 CHAIRMEN
OF LEAGUE CHOSENAN
Chairmen of all Women's league UC
ed yesterday by Marguerite Chapin,
president of the Women's league.R E
Following is a list of the commit- LASS
tee chairmen: membership, Cornelia
Clark, '21; social, Nellie Yerkes, '22;
house, Norma Judson, '22; dramatic, CARL T. HOG
Sue Verlinden, '20; banquet, Marion . &D
Treadgold, '20; intercollegiate, Anna1
Yorkes, '20; vocational conference,
Alice Comlossy, '21; post-war commit-
tee, FlorenceFields, '20; point sys- WEEK OF
tem, Laura Snyder, '22; publicity, FOR
Margaret Jewell, '20.
Tug of War a
BLOOD POISONINGvents
FATl TO OCTOR cTwo pep me
cane spree, an
contest will re
Dr. Willy C. R. Vogt, Director of Cli- freshmen and
ieal Pathology, Dies at Homoeop . week of May
Hospital Spring games
Hold
WAS WELL KNOWN MEMBER OF The contests
HOMOEOPATHIC PROFESSION the underclass
a freshman p
Dr. Willy C. R. Voigt, '18H, died May 14, and a
Sunday night, April 27, at the Homoe- next evening.
opathic hospital. plain the gam
As a result of a finger prick, sus- on their enthu
tained while making experiments in Committees
his laboratory last Sunday, April 20, ready for the
blood poisoning set in and though un- ing named by
der the personal care of Dean Hins- student counci
dale, the nature of the infection was Spring game
such that his life could not be spar- class athletes
ed. es. Contesting
"Dr. Voigt's true worth to the hos- later from the
pital cannot be estimated," stated Dr. schools. The
C. B. Stouffer of the Homoeopathic the tug of wa
hospital and the University health from the relay
service. He was the director of clin- Bids R
ical pathology and an instructor in The chairma
physical diagnosis. Last year he as- place for the
sisted the dean in internal medicine as in former year
well. For the past four years he has the bag contes
been an understudy to Dr. R. R. Melon, on the schedul
who is the city pathologist for Roches- received for th
ter, N. Y., and for the Rochester vas bags for
Homoeopathic hospital. For the past The tug of
six months Dr. Voigt has had an office afternoon and
on State street and already had built races, and bag
up a splendid practice. Saturday morn
Dr. Voigt was a member of the Al- Secure Ne
pha Sigma medical fraternity and al- At the meeti
so of the national body of the Ameri- cil Tuesday ev
can Institute of Homoeopathy. He be made for p
has presented many valuable papers paraphernalia
bearing upon his specialty to state and discussed.
national bodies of medical men.
A wife and eight-months-old baby
girl are left. Dr. Voigt was 35 years CvmmC
of age. Funeral sevices will be held
St 10:30 Tuesday morning at the home, Spors
with the Reverend Dr. Stalker officiat- r
ing. Burial will be in Springdale, Pa.
An All-Econ
DEAN EFFINGER IS given under th
merce club at
ON EXTENDED TRIP in the Michig
- this smoker a
At the inauguration of the new pres- corridors of t
ident of Knox college, and at the an- The price is 2
nual conference of deans of the state This smoker
universities, both of which are to be together for a
held this week, the University. will be administration
represented by Dean John R. Effinger, ments and e
who left yesterday on his extended these subjects
trip. creating more
Dean Effinger will go first to Gales- tween studen
burg, Ill., where he will attend the in- and of causin
auguration on Tuesday of President economic subj
James L. McConaughy, who is to be- iancial proble
come the executi4 of Knox college. Professors H
It is expected that Dean James R. An- W. Wenley, an
gell will be one of the principal speak- speak. All me
ers at these ceremonies. On Wednes- faculty will be
day, Dean Effinger will leave Gales- traction is to b
burg for Lawrence, Kansas, where he of the busines
will attend during the week-end the ment. Jack R
annual conference of deans of the R. Kempf, '20

state universities, which is to be held players.
at the University of Kansas. At one Raymond C.
of the joint meetings he will speak on the smoker co
the subject, "Physical Education and the good smok
Athle tics" invited.

CONTEST
:EN LOWER
ES PLANNED
AN IN CHARGE OF
'IITTEES FOR
EyENTS
MAY 11 SET
SPRING GAMES
id Bag Contests Biggest
on This Year's
Program
etings, a tug of war, a
obstacle race, and a bag
quire the efforts of all
sophomores during the
11 to .8, the annual
period.
Pep Meetings
for the supremacy of
es will be heralded with
ep meeting Wednesday,
sophomore meeting the
Pep speakers will ex-
es to the men and spur
siasm.
to attend to making
various events are be-
Carl T. Hogan, '20E,
ilman in charge of the
s. Prominent upper
will be appointed judg-
captains will be chosen
lit and engineering
captains will weigh in
r men and pick teams
r tryouts.
eceived for Bags
n ha secured the same
tug of war as was used
s. The tug of war and
t are the biggest events
e. Bids are now being
e making of the 10 can-
the bag contest."
war will be held Friday
the cane spree, obstacle
contest will be run off
ing.
cessary Equipment
ng of the student coun-
ening arrangements will
rocuring the necessary
for each contest will be
Tce Club
sors Smoker
omics smoker is to be
ie auspices of the Com-
7:15 Wednesday night
an Union. Tickets for
re on sale today, in the
he Economics building.
5 cents.
is to be a general get-
1 men of the business
and economics depart-
veryone interested in
for the purpose of
intimate relations be-
ts taking these courses
g a general interest in
ects and business and fi-
ms.
lenry C. Adams, Robert
d I. Leo Sharfman will:
nbers of the Economics
present. An added at-
e music, played by men
s administration depart-
Gardner, '21, and Paul
, will be some of the

Smith, '20, chairman of
mmittee, promises all of
es possible. Everyone is

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Paris, April 28.-At today's plenary
session of the peace conference the
council of four presented the text of a
peacextreaty provision for the prose-
cution of the former Emperor Wil-
1iam by a court of five judges "for a
supreme offense against international
morality and sanity of treaties." It
will fix the punishment of the accused,
whose extradition s to be asked.
Paris, April -28.- The Temps says
today that it is asserted in American
peace conference circles that Presi-
dlent Wilson does not expect to add
anything to his recent statement on
the Adriatic issue with Italy.
Yokohama, Japan, April 28.-A large
section of Yokohama was ravaged by
fire today, 2,000 buildings, including
a part of the business section, being
burned. Firemen from Tokio aided in
checking the flames before they reach-
ed the foreign residential district.
ELECTED COLLEGES
ASSOCIATION HEAD
Marguerite Chapin Chosen President
Of Intercollegiate Women's
A ssociationt
NEXT ANNIAL CONVENTION
IV I L BE HELD IN ANN ARBOR
Marguerite Chapin, '20, representing
the University of Michigan, was elect-
ed president of the Middle Western
Intercollegiate association for wom-
en's self government at its meeting
last week at the University of Illin-
ois, Champaign, Illinois. Michigan was
also fortunate in securing the next na-
tional convention of the association
for Ann Arbor.
Many Colleges Represented
Round table discussions on such
subjects as the honor system, educa-
tion of women for citizenship, the
point system and vocational guidance
were held during the three days of
convention. Eleven colleges and un-
iversities were represented officially
and many others by visiting delegates.
Discuss Post War Work
Dean Ruth E. Mason, of the Univer-
sity of Illinois, and Dr. Allene Greg-
ory addressed the convention on the
theory of self government. The con-
version of war work into post war ac-
tivities occupied a prominent place in
the discussion.
Faculty Members Talk
"Personality in Organization," was
the subject of a talk by Dr. E. C. Hayes
of the psychology department of the
University of Illinois. Vocational guid-
ance was discussed by Dr. Lorinda
Parry, and the conference was appoint-
ed as a committee to pool information
on this topic.
SOPHOMORES MUST EXCHANGE
PROM TICKETS FOR OTHERS
All sophomores who have received
tickets for the soph prom to be held
on Friday night May 2, in the Armory,
should have them exchanged at once
for red tickets. No white tickets will
be accepted at the door. The red tick-
ets may be secured from Edward Ush-
er. 806 Hill street.
The prom will be formal for women
and informal for the men.
A few more tickets may be secured
from Edward Usher. Price $4.40.
Student Council Meets Today

All members of the student council
must be present at the meeting at 7
o'clock Tuesday night at the Union.
Important matters pertaining to the
Spring games will be discussed.

DR1 ANGELL DENIES REPORT THAT HE
WOULD ABOLISH INTERCOLLEGIATE
SPORTS AND DISCHRG6ECOACH YOST

-
w ;
Colre-ie resh'ov/hy
wowr/l5speak 'ere.-
('ln aiirrwad 4 (itdertwoocd
"LITTLE GRANDMOTHER"
RUSSIAN REGIME VICTIM
MME. BRESHKOVSRY SPENT HER
LIFE FIGHTING CGAR'S
TYRANNY
Mme. Catherine Breshkovsky, who
speaks tonight at 8 o'clock in Hill
auditorium upon the subject, "Rhe-
claiming Russia," is 75 years old. She
was born in 1844 on an estate in the
district of Vitebsk in Little Russia.
Her father was the son of a Polish
aristocrat, her mother came of a no-
ble family of Great Russia.
Impressed by Injustice
From her earliest years, Catherine
Breshkovsky had been impressed by
the contrast of living conditions ex-
isting between her father's serfs and
that of her own family. -
Throughout her girlhood she was
constantly thinking of ways in which
the evils about her might be remedied.
At the age of 25 years she married a
young nobleman of Liberal tendencies.
Her husband was in sympathy with the
revolutionary movement in Russia but
was not prepared, as was she, to make
great personal sacrifices in the way of
.the cause.,
Hated Autocracy
The longer Mme. Breshkovsky
studied the problem, the more she be-
came convinced that autocracy must
be overthrown if the suffering peas-
antry weret to be relieved. ┬že did not
quail in the knowledge of the inev-
itable results which would follow an
open profession of her beliefs. She con-
sequently became an active agitator
against the Russian political system.
After a few years of campaign work
Mme. Breshkovsky was apprehended
and imprisoned. She served two years
of solitary confinement under the most
revolting conditions before her trial
was heard.
Sentenced to Mines
She was the first woman to be sen-
tenced to the mines as a hard labor,
convict. She was given a five year,
term, the same punishment as that
meted out to a murderer.
After serving her term, she return-
ed from Siberia and immediately set
about organizing once more disguised
(Continued on Page Six)

DETROIT PAPER GIVES FALSE
IMPRESSION OF DR. ANGELL'S
ATTITUDE
HOLDS ATHLETIC COACH
MAY PERFORM MISSION
Would Have Head of Athletics Prove
Real Element for Good Among
Students
(Herbert R. Slusser)
"The Michigan Daily: -
"No truth whatever in the report
concerning Mr. Yost, nor in my alleg-
ed intention to attempt to prevent in-
tercollegiate athletics. My views on
athletics are in part contained in pa-
per read before New York meeting of
National Intercollegiate Athletic asso-
ciation.
"J. R. ANGELL."
The preceding telegram was receiv-
ed by The Daily Monday afternoon
from Dr. James Rowland Angell, f
the University of Chicago. The mess-
age is a direct denial of a report pub-
lished in a Detroit paper to the effect
that, if Dr. Angell should accept the
presidency of the University of Michi-
gan, he would demand Michigan's
withdrawal from intercollegiate ath-
letics. The report, the falsity of
which is established by Dr. Angell's
telegram, caused much excitement on
the campus and in educational and
athletic circles throughout the coun-
try.
Follows Regents' Session
Following the all day session of the
regents Friday, during which they fail-
ed to come to a final decision regard-
ing the conditions to Dr. Angell's ac-
ceptance of the presidency of the Uni-
versity, a Detroit paper presented as
the bone of contention Dr. Angell's
"alleged intention to attempt to pre-
vent intercollegiate athletics. The
Sunday edition of the paper went
farther, raising the questions, "How
far would he go? Would he dismiss
Coach Yost?"
In {his own words, Dr. Angell de-
nes any intent either to dismiss Mr.
Yost or to abolish intercollegiate ath-
letics. He refers to his views on ath-
letics as expressed in a paper read be-
fore the annual convention of the
National Collegiate Athletic associa-
tion held Dec. 27, 1918, in New York.
In that speech Dr. Angell pleads for a
different and higher conceptio of the
duties of the athletic coach, and for
a less w'arped conception of the rela-
tion of sports to the college. Dr. An-
gell's conception of the head of the
athletic department is given in the
following extract from his paper:
Gives Opinion of Duties
"If, then, physical education in the
largest sense is an intrinsic part pf
the work of the college, why should
there longer be hesitation in recogn'iz-
ing that fact and accepting the full
responsibility which goes with it? Why
should there not be professorships of
physical education, presided over, as is
already the case in certain highly rep-
utable institutions, by men of profes-
sional rank especially trained for the
work? It is an ignorant observer who
does not know that the successful
coach or athletic director exercises a
far greater moral influence over the
average college men than any but the
most exceptional preacher can do.
Moreover, it is an influence which the
(Continued on Page Six)

ti.4_ i1 G1^lri7r. .. _ . __ ..: ..

FACULTY MEMBERS, NOTE!

ALL SEATS RESERVED
THE CERCLE FRANCAIS PRESENTS

"NOS INTIP
MODERN FRENCH DRAMA

TREASURERS MUST REPORT
Treasurers of all classes who
as yet have not collected dues
are requested to report to G B.
Berg, '19, at the booth in Unl-
versity hall between 4 and 5
o'clock, Tuesday, April 29, 1919.

Easily Understood
Interesting Plot
Humor, Action

Thursday, May 1,8 P. M.
SARAH CASWELL ANOELL HALL

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