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April 27, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-27

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THE WEA
FAIR AND SL
WARM

kTHER
IGHTLY
ER

AWfItr t an

:4Iu itg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SEBVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 144. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1919. PRICE THREE CE

ANXIETY REIGNS
IN CONFERENCE;
EYES'ON ITALY
SITUATION IN LATIN CAPITAL
TENSE; ANTI-AMERICAN
FEELING HIGH
LAST ITALIAN ENVOYS
WITHDRAW FROM PARIS
Americans and British Hopeful of
Satisfactory -Adjustment with
Rome
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Aprl 26.-This has been one
of the most anxious days of the peace
conference with all eyes turned to
Rome. While work preceded on the
final details of the treaty, before the
meeting with the German delegates at
Versailles, the absorbing topic every-
where was the Italian issue and the
effect it had in store for the confer-
ence. Brief information reaching of-
flical quarters showed the situation at
Rome to be very tense with anti-Amer-
ican sentiment running high..
Italian Envoys Leave
The departure of Baron Sonnino
and Signor Salandra at 2 o'clock this
afternoon for Rome took the last of
Italy's plenipotentiaries from the
scene, leaving only subordinates with-
out power of action. ,
Little Change in Paris
There has been little change in the
situation . here. The British and
American delegations are hopeful of a
satisfactory adjustment, but are fear-
ful that the enthusiasm of the Italian
people may compel the Italian delega-
tion to make demands which cannot
be met.
President Wilson conferred with all
the members of -the American delega-
tion late this afternoon. In the fore-
noon he met with Premiers Lloyd
George and Clemeneau to discuss fi-
hancial matters.
PRODCTION OF MASQUS
ADPTEO FOR MATEURS
MAUDE ADAMS RECOMMENDS THIS
MASTERPIECE; BAR-
RIE'S
"Quality Street," the annual play to
be produced by Masques on May 8 and
9, is unusually well adapted for ama-
teurs of the type who are now work-
ing in it, according to Miss Maude
Adams. Although Miss Adams was not
speaking of (the local presentation,
she recommended it several months
ago, when one of the girls in Masques
was on the professional stage and had'
the opportunity of speaking to Miss
Adams on this subject.
When asked what type of plays were
best adapted to amateur work, she
said Barrie's works were, and in par-
ticular his "Quality Street." Although'
a $100 royalty had to be paid for1
Masques to use this play, Prof. J. R.
Nelson, director, and the whole caste.
are enthusiastic about it.
The romantic flavor of love and
war, the whimsical Barrie humor, the
strikingly dramatic situations and thei
quaint characters appeal to the enthu-
siasm of amateurs and assures them
success in the portrayal of "Quality
Street."
The production of Masques will be.
open to the public on May 8 and 9a
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The1
ticket sale will begin Saturday,]
May 3.
"GREEN STOCKINGS"
STANDS TIME TEST

That "Green Stockings," the three"
act play to be presented at the Whit-1
ney theater on May 23 by the Comedy1
club, has not lost any of its powers of
attraction for the dramatic world de-1
spite the time it has been on the field,
is amply evidenced by the frequent1
productions of the comedy recently.
Among the most important of theser
productions is that to be given thist
week at the Woldorf Astoria in New1
York City by the Wexco club, a drau-
atic organizatio which is one of thip
activities of the British War Mission.
CHICAGO, PENNSY, CORNELL
VICTORIOUS IN DRAKE RELAYS
Philadelphia, April 26.-The East
captured two of the three national re-
lay championships at the annual Drake.
carnival of the University of Pennsyl-
vania today. Chicago won the two-
mile relay title, the University of Penn-
sylvania captured the one-mile event
in a hot finish, and Cornell with
Dresser, its champion distance runner,

"BE FIRM,"
ORLANDO

SAYS
AT ROME

(By Associated Press)
Rome, April 26.-Premier Orlando
in addressing the crowd which greet-
ed him today on his arrival here said:
"It is not time for fine language.
In the face of the world, which is
judging us, we must have firmness
and a calm, serene, conscience.
' "There are two questions as to
whether the government and the Ital-
ian delegates have faithfully inter-
preted the faith and will of the peo-
epi."
The response was "Yes."
"I never doubted it," he said, "for
I know the soul of my people, but con-
firmation was required. The first
question was answered. Rome has
consecrated our work.
"The second question is to estimate
the gravity of the situation but I do
not ask you for an immediate reply.
Let us not now consider what best or
most desirable can happen to our
Italy, whose just and praiseworthy at-
titude has provoked the admiration of
two worlds.
"The decision must be a well con-
sidered one. Food supplies are fail-
ing us, but Italy, which has known
hunger, has never known dishonor. I
do not conceal from you the danger of
the very critical hour.
"I am with you," continued the pre-
mier, "a brother among brothers, and
also a chief who asks to obey and fol-
low the will of the people. It may be
that we shall find ourselves alone but
Italy must be united and have a sin-
gle will. Italy will not perish."
BIENNIAL CONTENTION
OF MORTARBOARD ENDS
NEW CHARTER GRANTED FOR SO-
CIETY AT DE DE PAUW
UNIVERSITY
Enthusiasm from beginning to end
proved the key-note of the first bien-
nial convention of Mortarboard, senior
women's national honorary society,
which closes this morning after its
three-day session in Ann Arbor. This
event marks a second definitetep in
the national growth and unity of the
organization, and has been successful
in outlining efficient policies of co-
operation between such a society and
Unverisity life.
Following the banquet Friday night
in the Michigan Wnion, a convention
business meeting was held Saturday
morning in Lane hall. Among its re-
sults was the granting of a new char-
ter to De Pauw university. The deci-
sion was sent by telegram to the pe-
titioning organization. It is the policy
of Mortarboard to consider requests
for new charters only from colleges
and universities of official first-rate
standing. A committee was also ap-
pointed at this meeting to organize a
Michigan alumnae chapter of Mortar-
board.
Luncheon for the active and visit-
ing members was served Saturday
noon in Foster's tea room, following
which the guests were entertained at
an organ recital by Emily Loman, '19,
in Hill auditorium. The rest of the
afternoon was devoted to a reception
in Martha Cook building, at which
Dean Myra B. Jordan was hostess to
the senior women of the University in
honor of the visiting representatives.
Miss Greenwood and the members of
Mortarboard were in the receiving
line.
As a fitting consummation to its
formal business affairs, Mortarboard
closes its convention this morning '
with an up-river breakfast. The next
convention will be held in 1921, at
Ohio State university.
Thetdelegates to the convention in-
clude the women from other colleges:
University of Missouri, Miss Mildred
Logan; Swarthmore college, Mrs. C.
G. Myers; Ohio State university, the

Misses Helen Dustman, Anna Cornell,
and Alfreda Bradley; University of
Illinois, Miss Marie Cronin; Univer-
sity of Minnesota, the Misses Helen Tu-
mey, Ada Brown, and Marion Wash;
Cornell university, Miss Virginia
Phipps; University of Michigan, Doris
McDonald.

i
ICTORY BONDS
FOR TRUST FUND,
GIFT OHS9CLASS
LITS PLAN TO RAISE $400, AND
ENGINEERS ANNOUNCE $200 I
THEIR AIM
MONEY TO BE RAISED
DURING COMING WEEK
Will Arrange for Alumni Trust Fund
Organization to Care for Dona.
tions to University
Instead of leaving to their Alma
Mater some well meant but inappro-
priate memorial, the senior lits and
the senior engineers have decided to
leave as their contributions to the Uni-
versity, Victory bonds .which shall be
turned over to an alumni trust fund
organization.
At a class meeting held Tuesday
afternoon the senior classes expressed
themselves in favor of leaving their
memorials in the form of monetary
contributions to be held in trust for
use by the University in any way which
it saw fit.
Dues to Help Pay
The money will be raised on Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Thursday, in the
literary college through dues and as-
sessments, and will be invested, imme-
diately, in Victory bonds. The senior
lits expect to turn over $400, while
the senior engineers are planning to
raise $200.
During commencement week, when
the alumni are back, the plan of the
classes of 1916 will be carried out.
That is, an organization will be formed
which will in the future be known as
the Alumni Trust Fund board. Its busi-
ness will be to hold in trust sums of
money left by the classes of 1919 and
subsequent classes. The board will
allow these sums to accumulate until
enough money has been raised to meet
some real need of the University.
Introduce New. Plan
In future years if alumni leave
money to the University or make be-
quests, it is planned that the amounts
of these donations shall be accredited
to the class of which the donor was
a member, through the Alumni Trust
fund. This plan was suggested by the
class of 1916 but owing to the war it
was not worked out.
It is hoped that by means of this
fund in which all of the memorial con-
tributions of the different classes and
the individual donations of class mem-
bers may be kept in trust, that there
may be keener interest taken in mak-
ing class memorials.
COSMO CLUB HEARS
PROF. SELLARS TALK
"Four conditions, I believe, charac-
terize the ideal university," said Prof.
Roy W. Sellars of the philosophy de-
partment in his talk before the Cos-
mopolitan club Saturday evening on
"University Education."
"These conditions are: an atmos-
phere of intellectual curiosity, practi-
cal but harnessed, and not commer-
cial; freedom for teachers from pecu-
niary aims, that is, freedom to devote
all their attention to the advancement
of their special branch of knowledge;
a most careful selection of teachers;
and good equipment which will en-
able extensive research."
Professor Sellars spoke in place of
Prof. R. M. Wenley, who was unable
to be present. Following the talk, Mr.
N. C. Fetter of the University Y. M. C.
A. spoke in regard to "The All-Nation
Hullabaloo," which the club is pre-
senting next Friday night in Hill aud-
itorium.'

ILLINOIS PROFESSORS
UNION; FIRS
College professors and instructors
of the University of Illinois have 'unit-
ed in forming a union called Local
No. 1, and have applied for admission
to the American Federation of Labor.
This is the first attempt at the forma-
tion of a labor union among college
teachers on record.
Commenting upon the action of the
Illinois teaching force, Dr. Harry Pratt
Judson, president of the University of
Chicago, said Saturday, "I don't care
to discuss the question, and I don't
want to take any notice of the mat-
ter."
The only organization otcollege pro-
fessors in the University of Michigan
is the local branch of the Ass'ociation
MEMBERSHIP CAMPIGN
TO BE AUEO BY UNION
HELD IN CONNECTION WITH
COUNTRY WIDE EFFORT
FOR DONATIONS
In connection with the country-wide
campaign now being held to secure
subscriptions for the completion of the
Union, a campaign for life members
will be held in the near future.
Clayton S. Shoemaker, '20E, has
been appointed chairman of the cam-
paign. The sub-chairmen are:
G. P. Schafer, '20A; W. R. Frazer,
'20E; R. M. McKean, '19M; F. W. Par-
sons, '20E; R. F. Grindley, '21E; L.
R. Van Ness, '20; P. Van Brunt, '20;
K. Harms, '20E; S. T. Lowe, '20E; H.
R. Slusser, '20; W. B. Weathers, '21E;
W. P. Favorite, '20E; C. R. Ford, '20E,
and Willis Blakeslee, '20.
The life membership fee of the
Michigan Union is $100 but for men
who sign up now and start payments
their senior year or the year follow-
ing their senior year, the fee will be;
only $50. No money will be required of
subscribers at this time. The $50 may
be paid in installments of $10 each
beginning in the subscriber's senior
year or the entire amount may be paid
at ..once,
Oxford Does Not
Equal frichiggn
"Oxford is a beautiful place; it
creates an atmosphere of greatness
with its old buildings and its shadedt
streets," said Cyril Arthur Player, an
Oxford graduate of the class of 1907,
special writer of the Detroit News, in
an interview Friday night after the1
Sigma Delta Chi banquet, at which he
was one of the speakers.
"But Michigan is a greater univer-
sity," he added, and explained, "As
.you go along the walks of Oxford,
which so many great men have trod,
you feel that you should strive forI
their greatness, but you realize that
you can never attain it. Here, at
Michigan, every man feels that he has
an equal chance with the others. '
"Oxford is distinctly an aristocractic
university; Michigan is democratic.
At Oxford the expense is so great that
a person cannot really take part in the1
life of the place on an equivalent of
less than $2,500 a year. It is unheard
of for a student to earn money in any
way but tutoring. All other work is
considered beneath the dignity of a
student.
"The Rhode's scholarships have done
a great deal toward making Oxford
less exclusive, but even the $1,500 will
not allow a student to take full part
in the life of that school."
Mr. Player said that Michigan was
one of the first American universities
of which he heard.

s
r
1,

ORGANIZE
T OF KIND ON RECORD
i of American College Professors which
numbers about 50 members. The as-
sociation attempts to unify somewhat
the voice of the teaching staff in ques-
tions that may arise regarding the re-
lation of the individual instructors
and the institution.
During the war, three members of
the faculty of the Columbia univer-
sity faculty, Scott Nearing, Charles A.
Beard and Mr. Dana, applied to the
association for intercession in their
behalf, during the controversy which
was based upon their radical procliv-
ities. The association saw fit not to
intervene and the three professors
were dropped from the Columbia
teaching staff.
Prof. R. M. Wenley, chairman of the
University branch of the Association
of American College Professors, said
Saturday night when his opinion of
the new union at Illinois was asked,
"I know nothing of it. As far as I
know, nothing of the sort is contem-
plated at Michigan."'
Prof. J. W. Scholl, of the French
and German departments, did not see
success in the plan in view of the fact
that the ideals of the university man
and the labor union group were not
the same. He added, "I am afraid
that the American Federation of Lab-
or, itself, will iiot welcome the plan,
except as it may see in the possibility
of a union of college instructors, a
possible tool to their own ends."
SPEAKER TO TELL OF
CONDITIONS IN RUSSIA

HEROIC WOMAN SPENT
YEARS IN RUSSIAN
PRISONS

MANY

Mme. Catherine Breshkovsky, who
speaks at 8 o'clock Tuesday evening,
April 29, at Hill auditorium under the
auspices of the University Oratorical
association, has said, concerning the
life of sacrifice and privation which
she has voluntarily taken upon her
shoulders for the welfare of her torn
country: "My life has been like a
journey. If any opportunity of per-
sonal happiness has come to me, I
have taken it only as I might pick a
flower by the wayside or eat a bon
-bon."
Many of the years intervening be-
tween Mme. Breshkovsky's first visit
to America, and that of the present
day, have been years of imprisonment
for the brave woman. Since 1904,
,the date of Mme. Breshkovsky's first
lecture tour in the United States, she
has spent no less than eight years in
prison camps, and one year in solitary
confinement in a formidable Russian
fortress.
It was not until the Czar's rule was
overthrown by the revolutionists that
MIe. Breshkovsky was freed.
In lecturing Tuesday night, she will
speak of the conditions existent in
Russia under the Kerensky regime,
as also of later conditions under Le-
nine, Trotsky, and other Bolshevist
leaders.
UNION ROOMS FOR
CAMPUS SOCIETIES
Newly furnished, freshly decorated,
and completely equipped, three rooms
suitable for the use of campus socie-
ties are now available in the new
Union. The Michigan Union plans to
place these rooms at the disposal of
University organizations free of
charge. It will be necessary to make
previous arrangements for their use
so that there may be no danger of
confliction.
One of the rooms is to be reserved
for technical societies such as Vul-
cans, Triangles, Quarterdeck and the
/like, another will be used by literary
societies, of the type of Sphinx and
Druids, and the third room will be
available for such organizations as
the A. S. M. E.
Closets for the storing of parapher-
nalia, the property of the different or-
ganizations using the rooms, are to be
provided. There may be a nominal
charge made for cleaning up after the
rooms have been used for such occa-
sions as initiations.

WOLVERINS WIN
DEISIVE ICTORY
FROM INDIA0NNI
GAME PROVES PITCHERS BATTI
WITH MICHIGAN HURLER THE
STRONGER
PARKS STRIKES OUT
19 HOOSIER PLAYER
Knode Brings in Three Counters Wi
Beautiful ThreeBagger; Visitors
Unable to Stop Varsity
Holding the visitors to a single w
and striking out 17 batsmen, Par
outclassed Kunkel, the Hoosiers' be
slab man, Saturday afternoon on Fe
ry field, and hurled Michigan to a 6 te
win from Indiana in the first loc
Conference tilt of the season.
Until the final round when Drisoc
effected a clean drive to left cente
Parks had the Bloomington out:
completely under control and allow
nothing to pass the infield. Durit
the whole session he gave his tea
only three possible assists, two
which he appropriated himself. A
remaining Hoosier connections we
handled by Froemke unassisted wil
the exception of a short fly which Ka
pus grabbed in the ninth from Su
heimer's bat.
Knode Heavy Hitter
Captain Knode topped the offensi
with three safeties out of foi
chances with the club. His most sei
sational register occurred in the Ma
and Blue section of the fourth innin
when with the bases full, he drove
long low clout to center field, takin
three sacks himself and chasing i
three runs ahead of him.
In the same fourth, Froemke a
Huber both reached first on legitima
connections which later resulted i
tallies. Outside of this occasion a
the three episodes of Knode, Kunk
held Michigan well within the scol
of his dignity and forced either lon
flies to the outfield or grounde'rs
the diamond proper. His support w
erratic throughout the game and ga
Lundgren's nine the opening to sco
six runs on five safe hits.
Wolverines Showed Improvement
The Wolverine squad showed cosht
erable improvement over its perforn
ance in the Case game and gave Pari
strong support at the few instancf
he called for it. The one error cre
ited against the champions when con
pared with the seven chalked again
Indiana gives estimates of the stead
ness of the two aggregations.
In the first inning three Hoosie
Lfanned the atmosphere and Drisco
Michigan half of the opener, Knoi
and Cooper flied to the outfield anI
Garrett fanned.
During the second and third inning
Indiana listened to Umpire Egan a
strikes as Parks increased his rep
tation, Rauschenback who formed tI
exclusive Bloomington base runnr
representation, got as far as secon
Michigan added two runs warrant
by one hit.
Parks Strikes Out Trio
The fourth period was unprofitab
for Indiana sluggers and Parks toc
credit for another trio of strikeout
It was in this round that Froemke at
Huber recorded hits after Van Bove
had been retired on a short aerial
Buttorff. Karpus reached first C
Rauschenback's miscue, filling t
bases. Parks overlooked the thi
good one and Knode delivered his tri
ple that added three runs. Coop
drew a pass and took second. Garre
fell asleep after placing an ea
grounder to the pitcher ant failed
reach the initial bag alth ugh Su
heimer dropped the ball.
Froemke grabbed two flies in t
fifth and Kunkel accepted the cou:
on strikes. Pheney, Van Boven a
Froemke retired in turn on infie
clouts.

(Continued on Page Three)
COLLEGIATE ALUMNAE HEARS
MRS. H. C. ADAMS MAKE REPOF'

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister ,
10:30 The Distinct Message of Christianity
Noon Prof. T. E. Rankin speaks to Young
People
6:30 Young People's Evening Service

I;

III

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
MISS CARLOTTA HOFFMAN
OF INDIA
"A WOMAN OF MAGNETIC PERSONALITY"

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Elijah A. Hanley
Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Rochester, N. Y.
"The Nation and Its New Moral Assets"

Mrs. Henry Carter Adams was
principal speaker at the regular m
ing of the Collegiate Alumnae asso
tion held Saturday afternoon at
home of Mrs. /Harry B. Hutchi
Mrs. Adams gave a report of the w
of the bi-ennial convention of Col
iate Alumnae which was held the :
week in April in St. Louis.
The entertainment committee
ported that full arrangements had b
made to secure Eddie Rickenbac
the ace of aces, to speak in Hill a
torium Saturday eveningl#May 3,,
der the auspices of the associat
The meeting was well attended.
L. C. Reimaun Represents T. lN. C.
Louis C. Reimann, '16, is the Wa
tenaw county representative in the
cial uplift work that is being do
among the boys of the state by
Y.M.C.A.

K

6:30

Methodist Students and Friends Invited

TONIGHT
7:30

METHODIST CHURCH

TONIGHT
?:30

I' .Y

r It

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