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April 26, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iT FMOUS IN UORLO

other calls for 137,613. Obvious

sly

IS CARPET ESSENTIAL
FOLLOWERS OF UINDOO
RELIGION

TOI

Tens of thousands of prayers woven
y hand into an intricate pattern
nakes a large mosque rug now on ex-
.ibit in the oriental rug display in
lie new Union, one of the most fan-
us in the world.
Many 400 Years Old
Probably having lain in a Hindoo
iosque 400 years ago, this ancient ex-
mple of the highest type of Ghiordian
rt, could it speak, would have a story
hat might be unrivaled in the history
f the world. For who but itself
ould tell of the myriads of bare feet
hat traversed its delicately wrought
urface could relate the religious em-
tions of those countless thousands
rho entered the sacred portals of the
emple?I
Each Design Is a Prayer
Though we are unable to converse
rith it, this rug has breathed forth its
iessage to Moslem worshipers for
mturies. It is composed of more than
0 narrow stripes woven side by side,
ach of which contains a narrow pat-
ern of one or, in some cases, several
ifferent designs. There are over 10,-
00 varying patterns in the rug and
hese are repeated hundreds of times.
ach different design stands for a dis-
inct prayer which the Mohammedan
tters as many times as the design is
epeated. One incantation calls for
,000 complicated repititions while an-

these require days to recite.
Part of Moslem Faith
This rug was woven purely to satisfy
the Moslem religion. An essential part
of the Mohammedanism is a self-in-
duced ecstasy where the worshiper
sees visions but performs wonders un-
der the influence of religious emotion.
Some of the worshipers known as
dervishes become hypnotized by their
religious feeling, and when under the
influence make easy work of handling
hot irons, eating live coals, glass, or
scorpions, not for the benefit of vulgar
curiosity but purely from a spirit of
religious edification. Stories of such
cases cannot be too greatly exagger-
ated as events actually have happened
commonly as described.
Because of the almost complete ex-
tipation of the people of Asia
Minor, rugs will never be creatbd
again which will even approach the
beauty aid elegance of this excellent
example of human handiwork.

i

PRESIDENCY TO BE
DECIDEDTHURSDAY
(Continued from Page One)
early American work of this kind,
while "A Dog's Head" by Rosa Bon-
heur ranks among the finest animal
paintings of the French school. Two
other paintings, one by Raphael Mengs
and another by H. K. Brown, of the
modern American artists were pre-
sented by Mrs. Collins Hubbard and
accepted by the Regents.
Consider Observatory Change
An appropriation of $650 was made
for the inventory and cataloging of
the University collection of rare coins.
Librarian W. W. Bishop states that
large collections of this nature are
often received, and facilities are most
convenient for the study of numis-
matics by devotees of ancient money.
A recommendation was made to the
Regents suggesting the change of loca-
tion of the observatory, because of the
smoke and the shaking of the earth
near the railroad tracks. The matters
was referred to committee for consid-
eration.
Regent Lucius L. Hubbard was
granted permission to have the Uni-
versity statutes and laws printed
which he has been compiling.
Resolutions Received
Resolutions were received from the

1D. A. C. FIRST IN TANK MEET
WITH MICHIGAN AT Y. M. C.
(Continued from Page One)
ing third place, also showed fine for
He gave the crowd a moment
breathless suspense when, in doing
back flip, it looked as if he would su
ly hit the spring board.
The meet was unofficial as far
the University was concerned, but w
sanctioned by the A. A. U. - The ma
purpose of the contest was to st2
a movement toward swimming as
recognized sport at Michigan, a gc
1 which will undoubtedly be reach
when the new Union pool is co
'pleted.

Waist-Seam Models

ill1t

Are the most Sty-
lish and Desirable
Spring Models for
Young
lcns
Su It S

No young man will
be disappointed if
he comes here, for
in our big stocks
can be found the
best in these styles
Then we have oth-
er styles including
the fit-form styles
in plain backs.

A.
im.
of
;a
re-
as
ras
ain
art
a
oal
ed
im-

ed:
Elizabeth Northup Avery, Floyd
Woodburn Bathurst, James Douglass
Lond, William'Morgan Brace, Raymond
Pierre Brown, Robert Carl Cole, Car-
roll Walker Collins, Holland Miller
Cowen, Ethel Elvena Crandal, Grace
Crockett, Lois Alice Devereaux, Law-
rence Deems Egbert, Charles Philip
Emery, William Harry Hogan, Her-
bert Edwin Johnson, Oscar Parmenas
Lambert( Adelia McCrea, Paul Parker
Magoffin, }Emma Marie Norton, Mar-
guerite Felice Novy, Gladys Collins
Pollock, Phillips Brooks Preston, Vic-
4,or Hugo Simmons, Clarissa Effie
Smith, Elinor Lindsley Trueman, Don-
ald Earl Wilson.
Bachelor of Science
Leo Francis Duggan, Wallace Ell-
wood Cake, Einer Bjarne Andersen,
Samuel William Becker, George Max-
well Brown, Richard Enlow Welch,
Lambert, Adelia McCrea, Paul Parker
Nakai, Leonard Francis Thalner.
Teachers' Diploma
Elizabeth Northrup Avery, Robert
Carl Cole, Lois Alice Devereaux, Leo
Francis Duggan, Gladys Collins Pol-
lock, Jacob John Powels, Clarissa Ef-
fie Smith.
FIRST NATIONAL CONVENTION
MORTARBOARD HELD IN UNION
(Continued from Page One)
ernoon, all senior women of the Uni-
versity are invited to meet the visit-
ing delegates at Dean Jordan's recep-
tion for Mortarboard in Martha Cook
building,
In addition to thorough instruction
about traditional and scholastic as-
pects of the campus, the delegates will
be given an opportunity to judge Ann
Arbor's rural attractions Sunday
morning, when the convention closes
with an up-river picnic.
Dependable, Scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. Jain St

UNIVERSITY VICTORY LOAN
TOTALS AMOUNT TO $42,000
(,Continued from Page One)
the result which was obtained is sat-
isfactory."
Students Run Campaign
The student committee headquarters
was run entirely by students. They
took the subscriptions, handled the
money, and distributed the buttons and
V window signs which were distrib-
uted.
In the Michigan campus campaign
-$42,000 was raised, by voluntary sub-
scriptions, and the faculty subscrip-
tions were not solicited.
The Daily is your paper-support
it.-Adv.

TODAY
2:30 -- Michigan . Indiana baseball
game at Ferry field.
7:00-Upper Room Bible class meets
at 444 South State street.
7:30-Prof. R. M. Wenley addresses
Cosmopolitan club in Lane hall on
"University Education."
7:30-MovIes at the Methodist church,
showing Mary Pickford in "The Lit-
tle Princess."
The Daily is a campus institution
-Support it. $1.00 for the rest of the
college year.-Adv.

Michigan association of highway eng-
ineers, recognizing the work done by
the University in the matter of good
roads. Suggestions were asked and
the need was mentioned from the eng-
ineering college to aid in the great
project for good roads. A communica-
tion was received from the Dental
Faculties Association of America, re-
questing that the University adopt the
requirement of one year of college
work preparatory to the course in the
dental school beginning with the year
1921-22.
Prof. G. M. Whipple, of the Carnegie
Institute of Technology of Pittsburg,
has been elected as professor of exper-
imentai education, Professor Whipple
has an international reputation and his
acquisition by the University is con-
sidered as a valuable addition to the
faculty, Ma r F. N. Menefee's leave
of absence was extended until next
fall. The resignation of Lieut. O. M.
McNeil, who has lately returned from
war service, was accepted, and Capt.
Clair Uptegrove was made assistant
professor of chemical engineering.
Felowship Alted
The following were appointed to fel-
lowships
Carl Braun fellowships 1919-20, 1918-
19, and 1917-18; Dorothy Walcott Cald-
well, B.S./Rhode Island State college,
M.S., ibid, $500; Paul Tuttle Delawan,
B.C.E., $500; Howard Scott Liddell, A.
B., A.M., $450.
University fellowships, $500 each;
Eber Malcolm Carroll, A.B., A.M.; Dor-
othy Hall, B.S.E.; Wiliam Harry Jelle-
ma, A.B., kM.; Charles Earl Sando,
B.S., Maryland Agricultural college;
Elliott Adams White, A.B., Harvard un-
iversity, A.M., University of Missouri,
University fellowships, $300 each:
Sotokicht Katsuizumi, A.B.; Helen
Ogden MahIn, A.B., DePauw university,
A.M.; Florence Fenwick, B.S. (Chem.);
Paul Alanson Warren, B.S., University
of Maine.
Buhl classical fellowship, $180:
James Eugene Dunlap, A.B., A.M.,
Ripon college.

L

a.
People tell us
our store Is different
Of course it's different.
Because it's a service grocery. It's not just a store
where groceries are sold.
It's a place where everything is done to make buying
groceries a real pleasure.
A big stock of good things to eat. Courteous, intelli-
gent clerks who understand their business thoroughly.
Prompt deliveries.
A telephone that is always open to you.
A place where you can have a charge account if you
so desire.
A store that sells quality goods which it can recommend
without the slightest fear or hesitation. To illustrate
what we mean, just consider the question of baking pow-
der. It's only a small part of our entire business but we
consider it a most important feature.
Because baking powder plays such a vital part in the
preparation of food in your home. If it isn't good it can
ruin a great amount of good material. Therefore the
baking powder we recommend must be good-so good
that we won't have the slightest chance of displeasing a
customer.
RYZON is such a baking powder. It's pure, it's always
uniform, always efficient and it will do anything any oth-
er baking powder will do. It's priced fairly and honestly,
too. ,;c per pound tin. Baking Book free.

Lamb &
W. D,
315 So. State St.
QUALITY

Spencer Store
McLean, Prop.
Ann Arbor, Nich.
SER VICE

' 'I

WHAT'S GOING ON

Personal Independence
UNLIMITED freedom of choice in the matter of Fabric
is yours.
And greater liberty in style is possible when you get our
T i"oring of Personal Independence and Emancipation from
th ready-made look.
Your suit will not look like any other best suit in the lot.
There is no lot,
Your suit is just yours. Made to your measure, to suit
you in weave and style--to fit your body--your mind--your
purse.
J. K. Malcolm
604 East Liberty St. -

4.

(11

(:4<
I

Select from our
stocks of
Hart,
Schaffner &
Ma rx
and your satisfac-
tion is sure.

Copyright 1919 Hart Schaffner & Mars

>: x

Reule, Conlin, Fiegel Co.
Home of Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes
Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets
University of Michigan
Summer Session 1919
.iore than 300 courses conducted by a staff
of 250 members of the regular faculties of the
University. All University facilities available
Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering
and Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study,
Library Methods, Biological Station. Embalm- '
ing and Sanitary Science, Public Health Nursing
June 30-- August 22; Medicine and Surgery,
June 30-August 8; Law, June 23-July 26 and
July 28-August 30.
The work is equivalent in method, character and credit value
to that of the academic session, and may be counted toward de-
grees. Certificates of credit and attendance issued. Many spe-
cial lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions. Cosmopolitan
student body. Delightful location. Expense low.
For further information, address
To E. RAN KI N.
Box 20, Aran Arbor, Michigan

P
PI

Degrees Awarded
The following degrees were award-

Special Discount to all
all teams for supplies.
harmacy.-Adv.

class base-
Cushing's

V -

JU

If it's a pair of

BOSTONIAN

OXFORDS

today
See our new arrivals in genuine Cordovans and
Russian Calf.
$9.00 and $10.00

Campus Bootery, sou a304A
Campu ~SOTH STATE ST.

,,

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