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April 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

urr

Lw 43rn

ttl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

---- -------

VOL. XXIX. No. 143.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 26. 1919.

PRICE THREE

_ I

UNIVERSITY LOAN
TOTALS $42,000;
DRIVE SUCCEEDS

No Permanent Break With Italy
General Opinion Of U. S. Delegates

DECISION ON PRESIDENT EXPECTED SETTLED THURSDAIY
REGENTS ADOPT GOVERNMENT R.O. T.C. TRAINING PLAN,
WILL BE CONFINED MAINLY TO ENGINEERING COLLE

COMMITTEE -CONTENT WITH
TION OF STUDENT BODY
IN CAMPAIGN

AC.

NO FACULTY AID IN
RAISING SUM NEEDED
Michigan's Quota Compares Well with
That of Other Western
Schools

(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 25.-While the Ameri-
can delegates expressed regret over
the temporary break with the Italians,
they were confident that some settle-
ment would be effected when the pre-
mier confers with the Italian parlia-
ment.
The general opinion in American
circles is that the making of peace
will be somewhat delayed. There is
no hint, however, that President Wil-
son will yield in the slightest con-
cerning Flume, and in the opinion of
the Americans an agreement can only
be reached by a change in the Italian
attitude.
Not a rupture, but a suspension of
Italy's collaboration in the peace con-+
ference - that is how the rituation
was defined in conference circles here.
The Italian delegation feeling that its

representative character has been call-
ed into question in certain quarters,
considers it its duty to refer to the
Italian parliament, but it is believed
to be probable that Premier Orlando
will be back in time for the opening
of the negotiations with the German
plenipotentiaries at Versailles, which
will not occur before May 1, or 2.
Until the Italian prime ministers re-
turn, the Italian delegates will not
attend the sessions of either the con-
ference or its commissions, but in or-
der to show that Italy desires to
maintain good relations with the Al-
lies, the Italians will continue to col-
laborate on the inter-allied commis-
sions not depending upon the peace
conference, such as the economic coun-
cil, the armistice commission, and the
commission on supply, transportation,
raw materials, etc.

Forty-two thousand dollars!
This is approximately the
which was raised by voluntary

sum
sub-

scriptions in the campus campaign for
the Fifth Liberty loan, during the four-
day campaign which began Tuesday
and ended Friday at 5 o'clock.
First Two Days Best,
The first two days of the campaign
were the two best, for on those days
$35,000 was raised; approximately
$13,000 on Tuesday; and $22,000 on
Wednesday. Thursday and Friday the
campaign slackened, for on each day
only $3,400 was raised, which brought
t he total up to $42,000.
The largest single subscription on
the campus was given by Ada Arnold,
'19, who bought bonds to the amount
of $5,000. The nearest approach .to
this sum was $2,500, and there were
several subscriptions of this size.
ommuittee Satisfied
ralph Gault, '21L, chairman of the
general committee in charge of the
drive, speaking of the work which had
been done, said, "We appreciate the
efforts of everyone who has worked
for this drive, and the spirit with'
which 'vfchigan students have entered
into the campaign. The amount which
was raised by subscriptions was en-
tirely satisfactory and the committee
wishes to thank the students who so
heartily entered into this campaign,
subscribing' for bonds and by their
work. '
"No small credit is due to those
members of the faculty who talked at
the fraternity and sorority houses, and
to those students who talked up the
campaign. The work of the archi-
tects in making and placing the Vic-
tory signs over the campus, helped
greatly. All worked in unison, and
(Continued on Page Six)
DETROIT SWIMMERS
DEFEAT MICHIGAN
Considering that the Michigan
swimming team has had poor facili-
ties for training and that they were
competing with a championship team,
their defeat at the hands of. the De-
troit Athletic club tank stars was not
as bad as the score of 37 to 13 might
indicate.'
The results of last night's meet are
as follows 60 yard free style, Rob-
erts, D. A. C. 35 sec; Dave Nixon D.
A. C. 35:2 and Gilmore M 3rd, Din-
widdie, M, 4th; 80 yard relay won by
D. A. C. in 37 3-5 sec. Mich. 40 4-5.
Briggs, D. A. C. 66.6, Moses, M 62.8,
Nixon, D. A. C. 53.4; 20 yard breast
stroke Roberts, D A. C. 12:2, Loeb,
M. 12.3 Babcock, Briggs; 20 yard back
stroke Don and Dave Nixon tied for
first place, time 12 see; Joyce, M 3rd;
Babcock, M 4th; 20 yard free style
Russel, D. A. C. 9:3, Don Nixon, 9:4,
Dinwiddie, M 3rd.
Between events Coach Matt Mann's
mermaids gave some exhibition swim-
ming, performing in beautiful style.
Mrs. Malcomson of the D. A. C., Cen-
tral Association champion and second
in the National championship, gave
the Arm Arbor spectators a real treat
in the form of a fancy diving exhibi-
tion.
The diving contest, won by White
of Michigan, was of the most inter-
est. There were the four compulsory
dives, swan, back, front jack-knife and
back jack and three optional dives.
Briggs, state champion fancy diver,!
White, M won the diving contest with
a score of 77.7 out of a possible 100.
who took second place, was handi-
capped for the reason that he has
been diving from a 10 foot board and.
had no time to get used to this board,
which was only two feet from the wa-
ter. However, White's dives could
hardly be improved upon and he won
much -deserved applause. Moses, tak-
(Continued on Page Six)

SIX INITIATED BY
SIGMA DELTA CHI

I

Malcolm W. Bingay, Managing Editor
of the Detroit News, Is Principal
Speaker
NEW MEN ADMITTED FRIDAY
NIGHT AT BANQUET AT UNION
Malcolm W. Bingay, managing editor
of the Detroit News, was the princi-
pal speaker at the spring initiation
banquet of Sigma Delta Chi, profes-
sional journalistic fraternity, Friday
night at the Union.
"The world is flooded these days
.with propaganda of every conceivable
kind; propaganda for good, as we un-
derstand it, and propaganda for evil.
We are being suffocated in a flood of
printers' ink. The world is a mosaic
of warring factions and each faction
is yelling and howling from its press
box," said Mr. Bingay. "The newspa-
per man must rise above blind parti-
sanship, must grasp the sorry scheme
of things entire, and leave propagan-
da to the propagandists.
Responsibility Grave
"In this waste, this weltering chaos,
in the center of this tumult and strug-
gle, there stands the newspaper man.
It is a time for iron nerves, calm
courage, and a sense of humor. He
has a responsibility as grave as that
of the churchman or the statesman.
"I thin* we will all agree that in
the reporting of man's social activi-
ties, his industrial, political and eco-
nomical development, there is but one
thing to do-learn all the facts and
report them honestly. The work of
the journalist in truly sensing his re-
sponsibilities, in the inculcating of
faith and charity and broad under-
standing in the public mind, is a big
and worthy task. I know of no higher
calling."
- Mr. Bingay's speech upon the re-
sponsibility of the newspaper man,
followed addresses by Prof. J. R.
Brumm, who discussed the profession-
al spirit in journalism, and by Cyril
Arthur Player, special writer on the
Detroit News, on "The Twenty-first
Century Newspaper." Prof. F. N.
Scott, of the rhetoric department, gave
a short talk on the relation of ideals
in journalism to the cry for sensa-
tionalism.
Initiates Welcomed
Milton Marx, '19, was toastmaster of
the evening. Clarence Roeser, '19,,
managing editor of The Daily, wel-1
comed the initiates, and Mark K. Ehl-
bert, '20, responded to the welcome.,
The neophytes admitted are: Ken-
drick Kimball, '20; Vincent H. Rior-
den, '20; Mark K. Ehlbert, '20; How-E
ard Weeks, '21; Paul A. Shinkman,
'20, and Herbert R. Slusser, '20.
IOWA WHIPS PURDUE 7 TO 6 ]
Lafayette, Ind., April 25.-Iowa de- i
feated Purdue 7 to 6 in a Western
Conference baseball game today.

DANCING FEATUES
ALL-NATION NIGT
Dancing from Al Countries Will Be
Big Feature of International
Event
CHAIRMEN WORKING ON MANY
DETAILS TO INSURE SUCCESS
Mind-reading by a genuine Hindoo
mystic will be a part of the business
to come up at "The All-Nation Hulla-
baloo," Michigan's international con-
ference, to be held Friday evening,
May 2, in Hill auditorium.
Russian dancing, Oriental fencing,
and the ever indispensible American
jazz, are other questions to be given
hearings, and it is promised that the
entire number of principals to appear
will easily hold their own with those
who are attending the international
conference "on the other side."
Committees are working busily to
make "The All-Nation Hullabaloo" a
memorable event in history, and pres-
ent indications point to a most satis-
factory settlement of all matters in-
volved. The committee chairmen are
as follows: Morikiyo Uyehara, SchoolI
of Music, general chairman; Mr.
George Wilner, dramatic director; Mr.1
Ralph Carson, treasurer; Mr. Roy C.
Jacobson, tickets; M. D. Immerman,
'19D, advertising; Stewart Baxter, '21,1
properties and costumes; A. M. El-
kind, '19D, eligibility, and P. A. Shink-
man, '20, publicity.
The Cosmopolitan club is in charge
of the affair and tickets may be se-..
cured from any of the members or
committeemen, or at any of the State
street stores.I
MORTARBOARD'S FIRST
CONVENTION SSIMBLES t
ALL SENIOR WOMEN INVITED TO
MEET DELEGATES AT
RECEPTIONt
With toasts from delegates repre-t
senting the spirit of Mortarboard in
seven different colleges and universi-
ties, the first national convention oft
the society began Friday night with a
banquet at'the Michigan Union. Groesot
Gaines, '19, president of Michigan
chapter, gave the opening welcome toI
the guests, and introduced the toast-
mistress, Huldah Bancroft, '15. A dis-
cussion of the future of Mortarboard
by Dean Myra B. Jordan, honorarys
member of the local chapter, conclud-b
ed the program.
The convention continues todaye
with a business meeting at 9 o'clock
this morning in Lane hall and a
luncheon for 45 active, alumnae, and
visiting members at 1 o'clock in Fos-f
ter's tea room. At 4 o'clock this aft-f
(Continued on Page Six) c

II ,
'ITALIAN SOLDERS IN FIUME
Paris, April 25.-An American
offier who left Fiume three days
ago and who has just arrived
in Paris says it was reported
there that a total of fourteen di-
visions had been moved to Fiume
by the Italians. He said the city
was full of Italian soldiers who
were arriving constantly.
Virtually all the inhabitants of
Fiume except Italians had left
the city before the officer de-
parted. Even many of the Itali-
an civilians, the officer added,
have departed.
Another American officer who
reached here today from Rome
says the feeling against Am-
ericans there is very bitter. He
asserts that he was asked in
Rome to leave cafes because the
proprietors said Italian officers
-..eclined to eat in the same places
with Americans.
ESPERANTO IS, POSSIBLE
INTERNATIONAL TONGUE
"Esperanto has nothing to do with
internationalism, or advanced social-
ism," said Dr. T. Sigel of Detroit in
a lecture on the subject Friday even-
ing in University hall.
"Dr. L. L. Zamenhof, a Russian-Pol-
ish Jew, invented it merely as an in-
ternatioial auxiliary language, be-
cause he believed that people of dif-
ferent races and tongues could settle
their differences more peaceably if
they could understand each other's
ideas and principles."
This is the 33d year that Esperanto
has been in practical use. Before that,
over 300 different systems were tried
but none survived.
Esperanto is based upon 16 different
Indo-European languages, but is ex-
peeted to take the place of none. It
is intended to be the long hoped-for
and often scoffed-at international
tongue. 4
In a one-half hour study a day for
four weeks, a reading, writing and
speaking knowledge of it may be ob-
tained. A man who knows the Eng-
lish language thoronehly has aboumt RE;

Forestry Club To
Return To Nature;
Rolled in their blankets, and sleep-
ing around the camp fires on the Sag-
inaw Forest farm, the members of the
Forestry club will spend the Friday
night before their annual field day.
Saturday, May 10, has been set as the
date and committees are already at
work getting plans under way.
The events of the day will begin
with a baseball game in the fore-
noon.
An old fashioned barbecue will be
held at noon. The meat will be sup-
ported on steel rods and cooked over
an open bed of coals, and, as the
club boasts of several experts in this
line of work, unusually good results
are expected.
As has been the custom at the field
days in the past, contests in rifle, pis-
tol and trap shooting will be held in
the afternoon. Talks will be given
by members of the department facul-
ty, and under their direction exhibi-
tions in camp breaking and packing
will be held. Prizes, the nature of
which is being held a secret by the
committees, will be awarded the win-
ners of the various events.
ART STUDENTS TO
SEE TILE MAKING
Students of the College of Archi-
tecture and members of the Ann Ar-
bor Art association will visit the Pewa-
bic Pottery, of Detroit, Saturday
morning, for the purpose of studying
the process of tile making for decora-
tiye and architectural purposes. The
party will leave on the 7 o'clock Mich-
igan Central train.
Through error in the Friday issue
of The Daily it was announced that1
a trip of this nature had taken placef
last Wednesday.
ITALIAN PAPERS BELIEVE
PVESIDENT'S STAND UNJUSTf

DEAN JAMES ROWLAND ANGELL'S STIPULATED CONDITIONS TO BE
DEFINITELY DECIDED UPON AT TIME OF
ADJOURNED MEETING
DRILL AND WEARING UNIFORMS NOT INCLUDED;
SYSTEM WITH CREDIT TO BE STARTED NEXT FALL

GovernmentSelects Michigaa t Za
Research in Hygiene; Donations
Recei-ed
(By T. F. McAlister)
Disposing of the most important
matter up for determination, that of
the acceptance of the presidency by
Prof. James Rowland Angell, of Chi-
cago, by adjourning for further Con-
sideration until next Thursday, the
Board of Regents occupied the session
yesterday afternoon with the adoption
of the R. O. T. C. military training
system at Michigan, the acceptance of
several donations, the award of de-
grees, and the appointment of fellow-
ships for the ensuing year.
It is understood that before the next
meeting the members of the board wil
have arrived at a definite decision re-
garding the conditions stipulated by
Dean Angell, and by that time it is
believed an understanding wil be
reached.
Accept Government Proposal
Acting upon the report of the co-
mittee on military, the Regents adopt-
ed the proposal of the war department
to establish a reserve officers' training
corps at the University. This organ-
ization beginning with the next fall
semester will be concerned especially
with the signal corps, and coast and
field artillery. Because of the nature
of the work, it will be confined for the
greater part to the engineering col-
lege, as over 90 per cent of the work
must be of necessity carried on in
conjunction with the various courses
in civil engineering and surveying.
Against Drill and Uniform
Introducing an attractive feature,
there will be no military drill nor
wearimg of uniforms about the campus.
During the college year, the work
done will be of a theoretical nature,
the practical application of the prin-
ciples thus studied to be put into ex-
ecution during the summer camps.
There will be several of these vaca-
tion training schools throughout the
country, and attendance during two
summers is necessary to receive cred-
it in the work. After two years thus
spent, students will receive 40 cents
a day from the government, and after
the passing of the examinations the
commission of second lieutenant will
be given those successfully completing
the course. During the six weeks of
the summer training, students will
receive army mileage to and from the
camps, and while no provision has
yet been made for pay, all uniforms,
food, housing, and equipment will be
given by the government.
Dr. Warthin Honored
Donating $6,000 to medical studies
in the University, the United States
Interdepartmental Social Hygiene
board specified that the sum should be
used in Dr. Aldred S. Warthin's work
to discover improved methods of dem-
onstrating the presence of spirochete
pallida in human tissues. Consider-
ing Dr. Warthin's researches of great
value and importance, the hygiene
board, interested in all discoveries and
methods in the treatment of venereal
disease, chose the Michigan man for
this special study. Dr. Warthin states
that the fund will be used during the
next three years for materials and as-
sistants in the work. The Regents
also authorized Dr. Warthin to pre-
sent an exhibition in mustard gas at
the June meeting of the American
Medical association.
The board accepted with a vote of
thanks, a gift of $1,000 from Mr. H. H.
Service, of Detroit, and formerly of
Ann Arbor, to be used as a loan fun
for la*..students.
University Given Paintings

Three valuable paintings were pre-
sented to the University by Mr. J. A.
Wetmore of New York, and were grate-
fully accepted by the board. Two
landscapes, "A Scene in the Catskills"
by Thomas Cole, and "A Scene in the
Delaware River" by Thomas B. Grif-
fin, are among the finest examples of
(Continued on Page six)

Americans
iu a

Cannot Agree with
f Proidnt_ Panr

At-

giu gw~ taiV61y nb uu aua e reeuirprapers
per cent of Esperanto already master- State
ed, as the grammar is the same as -
ours. The word system is exceedingly (By Associated Press)
simple. There are but 22 letters in Rome, April 25.-"What happened
the alphabet, but six of them have in Paris is altogether monstrous,"
two forms. All singular nouns end in says the Gionale de Italia in its com-
"o," plurals in "oj." There are but 12 ment on the peace conference situa-
verb endings. tion. "Against it we appeal to the
The language has made great prog- common sense of the American people,
ress, especially in England. All avia- asking them whether they consider the
tors in France are supposed to be attitude of their president a just and
versed in Esperanto. It is being straightforward one.
taught in the schools of many cities of "President Wilson forgot his princi-
this country and Europe. pies regarding the freedom of the seas
M. J. Morgenstern, '19E, and S. J. and the equality of races, and distrib-
Jaffe, ' 1, have plans under way for uted German, Bulgarian, Roumanian
the formation of a club in the Uni- and Hungarian territories among the
versity to enable any one interested to French, Bohemians, and Jugo-Slavs,
take up the study of the subject. remembering his principles only to
snatch from Italy the fruits of her
FRATERNITIES PROVIDE FOR sacrifices and victory. We are tran-
100 MEN DURING CONFERENCE quil, trusting in justice and right and
in the knowledge that a large major-
Invitations for the Michigan high ity of the American people do not
school senior conference to be held share the opinions of President Wil-
by the University Y. M. C. A. May 23 son. Therefore we do not consider
and 24, in Ann Arbor, will be sent out the generous American nation respon-
either today or on Monday. Approx- sible for the eccentricities of its pres-
imately 320 schools will receive these ident."
Invitations. The Epoca in its comment on the de-
With some 20 fraternities heard velopment in Paris says: "It is no
from, lodging and rooms have been more the kaiser, but another man who
found for 100 men who will attend the presumes to decide the destinies of
conference. peoples."

..

----------

ime. Catherine

ilreshkovsky,

The Little Grandmother of the

Russian

Revolution

"Reclaiming Russia" and Dr. Edward H. Egbert, formerly Chief Surgeon of
The American lied Cross Detchment in Russia
HILL AUDITORIUM, TUES. APRIL 29, 8 P. J7.

TiCkets o Cents at Wahr's, Slater 's, and Sheehan 's.

'Box office open at 7:30. Auspices of Oratorical Ass'n.

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