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April 25, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FAIR

WEATHER
AND SLIGHTLY
WARNER~

Sit i!3a

juadll

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND MIGHT WIRM
SERVICE

r

VOL. XXIX. No. 142. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 1919. PRICE THREE CENT

ORLNDO ANSWER
SAYS NOTHING OF
QUITTING PARLEi
0
DECLARES PRESIDENT TRYING T4
MBITTER ITALIANS AGAINST
GOVERNMENT
WILSON REBUKED FOR
BRTEACH OF DIPLOMACY
Rome Bases ClaIm on 14 Points
States Minister in Reply to U. S.
Executive
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 24. - The statement is
sued by Premier Orlando today says
nothing of, the intention of the Ital
ians to quit the peace conference. I
merely states Italy's case concernin
Fiume and the Dalmatian coast an
does not appear in the form of an ul-
timatum.
Premier Orlando declares that Pres
ident Wilson's proclamation is an at-
tempt to place the government in op-
position to the people
"He is treating the Italians as i
they were a barbarous people withou
a democratic government," stated
Premier Orlando.
Premier Rebukes President
The premier rebukes the Presiden
for addressing himself to the Italian
people over the head of the Italian
government, and says he never con-
sidered America bound by the Treaty
of London, but that Italy's case is bas-
ed on right- and justice.
The premier.says he has never de-
nied the Pact of London did not ap-
ply to Fiume, but the Italian claim
was based on the principles of Pres-
ident Wilson's 14 points.
Publication Angers Italians
The premier and other members of
the Italian delegation are much more
angry over President Wilson's world-
wide publication of his position on the
Adriatic question than over his oppo-
sition to the claims and the fact that'
diplomatic procedure has been violat-
ed. The alleged violation consists in
what is termed an insult offered to
the Italian government because the
President made his position known to
the Italian people over the head of the
peace delegation.
-- Buy Victory Bonds --
WOMEN MEET TO DISCUSS
NEW SOCIAL REFORMS
Social Service for women was the
special topic for discussion at the
year's last Vocational Conference, held
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium under the auspices of the
Women's League and the Y. W. C. A.
Miss Melita Hutzel of the Girls'
Protective league of Deroit described
the work of that organization, em-
phasizing especially the psychological
clinics.
The subject of industrial education
was discussed by Miss Mertland. At
present the federal government furn-
ishes the State of Michigan a certain
sum of money for this work provid-
ing the state itself furnishes an equal
amount. The greatest factor of this
work, the purpose of which is to pro-
mote the happiness of men and wom-
en in Industry, is occupational analy-
sis, which consists in testing all
workers for skill, education, and the
physical requirements for their indi-
vidual positions. Miss Mertland stat-
ed that the one requirement for it is
the overcoming of social prejudices.
Dr. W. G. Norton, who is at the

head of the Community Centers of De-
troit, gave a general summary and de-
scription of all the branches of service
into which social work has developed
in that city. There are nine of these
different branches and each has its
special organization and corps of
workers. Dr. Norton also emphasized
the dearth of workers existing at pres
ent.
Women who are interested in the
work elsewhere should write either
to the School of Civics and Philan-
thropy in Chicago or to the National
Social Workers' exchange in New York
City.
-Buy Victory Bonds -
RED CROSS CLOTHING DRIVF
ENDED; MARK NOT REA ChED
Although not up to the quota set
for this city a large amount of dis-
carded clothing was collected in the
recent drive for wearing apparel to
be sent abroad to war sufferers. About
1,500 pounds have been collected.
The drive was officially closed Sat-
urday but, as the articles are not yet
packed, donations will be accepted at
the Williams street rooms until the

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Washington, April 24. - Presiden
Wilson's attitude toward Italy was en
dorsed in a statement today by Sena
tor Johnson of California, who declar
ed "the present situation is the su
preme test of the profession of ou
puposes whichthe President has s
often voiced."
0 Washington, April 24. - Secretar
Tumulty in a statement issued tonigh
at the White House said a cablegran
had been received from Presiden
Wilson "giving positive and unquali
fed denial" to reports that the Presi
dent had entered into a secret allianc
or treaty with some of the great pow
ers.
Washington, April 24.-Nearly 150,
000,000 additional Victory Libert
Loan subscriptions were reported to
day to the national loan headquarter
and raised the total pledged and offi
cially reported to $396,496,000. *
s -- Buy Victory Bonds --
a NOW ORGANIZING
- Temporary Cairman and Organizatoi
f Committee Appointed; Prof. a-
t ow ski Talks on Former Club
I
FORTY FORMER AVIATORS AND
STUDENTS MEET AT UION
rThe University is to have an Aero
club. This was definitely decided
TThursday night when forty former air
*service men and aeronautical students
met at the Union.
Most of those present were former
pilots and among them were men who
served in the French flying corps,
Royal air service and the American
army, naval and marine service. Sev-
feral have been decorated.
William Smith, '20, was elected tem-
porary chirman and Harry M. Carey,
'20, Lewis H. Mattern, '19, Tom McAl-
lister, '21, and William Clarkson, '20,
were eleted,to the organization com-
mittee.
'Prof. F. W. Palowski of the Aeronau-
tical engineering department gave an
outline of the work of the formerUn-
iversity Areo club and brought up the
'question of whether a new club should
be started or the old one revived. This
will be decided later. Professor Paw-
lowski is very anxious to see the club
started as he believes it will be of
value both educationally and socially
to the air service men and the aero
students.r r
If the organization can be completed
next week it is probable that the club
will entertain Capt. Eddie Rickenback-
er when he comes May 3.
-Buy Victory Bonds-
Y. W. C. A. WORKERS
O F F E R POSITIONS
Opportunities for women as physi-
cal directors, club ande recreation
leaders and in other forms of social
service work, will be the subject of
addresses by Miss Constance Ball and
Miss Amanda Nelson, secretaries of
the national board of the Y. W. C. A.,
at vesper services Wednesday after-
noon in Barbour gymnasium. New of-
ficers will be installed at this time.
University women will be given an
opportunity to meet the secretaries at
a reception to be held immediately
after vesper services in the parlors of
Barbour gymnasium. Personal con-
ferences may also be arranged.
Positions for 200 women are now
available in various branches of so-
cial service work in connection with

the Y. W. C. A. Cafeteria directors,
overseas representatives, industrial,
business and general secretaries are
in demand. Miss Ball and Miss Nel-
ton will bring full and definite in-
formation in regard to these positions.
The advisory committee of the Y.
W. C. A. will give a reception for the
cabinet and committee chairmen in
honor of Miss Ball and Miss Nelson
Tuesday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. A. E. Jennings on Geddes ave-
nue.

UNIVERSITY FAILS
TO KEEP UP PACE
IN ICTORY LOAM

CLASS PRESIDENTS
SPUR ON THOSE
BONDS

URGED
SELLING

PRESENTING THE SAME APPEARANCE AS THEY DID AT SAGINAW, AND RENDERING THE SELEC-
tions with the same quality, the Varsity band will play in Detroit Friday at a noon Liberty Loan meeting.
The Band will be met at the station by a delegation of Detroiters, and then probably parade to the central por-
tion of the city. The meeting will probably be held at the Chamber of Commerce, and as soon as possible
after the dismissal the band will return to Ann Arbor.
This is the third trip that the band has taken in behalf of the Liberty Loan. The first was to Chicago where they
played before an assembly of the Seventh Federal district chairmen, and the second was at Saginaw last
Friday and Saturday.

DETROITEDITOR
Malcomb W. Bingay of the Detroit
News Speaks at Sigma Delta
Chi Banquet
DETROIT ALUMNI OF SOCIETY
TO REMAIN HERE OVERNIGHT
Malcomb W. Bingay, managing edi-
tor of the Detroit News and one of
the foremost newspaper men of the
country, will deliver the principal ad-
dress at the Sigma Delta Chi initia-
tion banquet tonight at the Union. Mr.
Bingay will talk on "The Responsi-
bility of the Newspaper Man."
Starts as Office Boy
Mr. Bingay started on the News
many years ago as an offict boy, and
rose to his present high position
through a course of self education,
and diligent application. From office
boy he went to the sport department,
where he made himself known as one
of the best sport writers in the United
States. He was called from there to
be city editor of the News, and was
later promoted to his present position.
It is the first time he has ever ap-
peared before an Ann Arbor audience.
Cyril Arthur Player, special writer
on the News staff, will also speak. Mr.
Player is an Oxford man and serv-
ed as a war correspondent during the
present war. His subject will be "The
Twenty-First Century Newspaper."
Six Men Taken in
Six men who have made them-
selves well known through their ac-
tivities in campus journalism will be
taken into the society this afternoon.
About 15 Detroit newspaper men,
alumni of the Michigan chapter of
Sigma Delta Chi, will be guests of the
chapter tonight. Covers will be laid
for 40 men.
Buy Victory Bonds --
GENERAL SENIOR EXAMS FOR
YALE, PRINCETON, HARVARD
Examinations along some general
field of college work will be required
of seniors at Harvard in order to re-
ceive a college degree.
This plan has been put into effect
at Yale and Princeton, according to
the Harvard Crimson and it is believ-
ed other American collegiate institu-
tions will follow the lead taken by
these three. This plan cannot be car-
ried out where a student is specializing
in some one subject.
The new plan is expected to em-
phasize the importance of a general t
education.

Needlework Guild
Locates Bra n c h
Mrs. Truman H. Newberry of De-
troit.gave an informal talk to the girls
of Newberry residence Thursday even-
ing in regard to the Needlework Guild
of America, explaining the history and
purpose of the organization.j
The Guild was, organized in 1885
with headquarters in Philadelphia. It
consists at the present time of 500
branches and 450,000 members. It is
humanitarian, non-sectarian, and ab-.
solutely philanthropic.
To become a member it is only nec-
essary to give two new garments a
year suitable for men, women, or chil-
dren. There are no fines or dues in-
volved. These garments are distribut-
ed systematically through the Guild to
the out-going patients of the hospi-
tals who are poor, and through vari-
ous channels of charitable work.
Mrs. Newberry spoke during the
afternoon at the home of Mrs. George
W. Patterson, where the following of-
ficers were elected for the Ann Arbor
branch: Mrs. George W. Patterson,
president; Mrs. Fremont Ward, sec-
retary; Mrs. Frederick McOmber,
treasure; Mrs. Henry Dean, Mrs. Har-
ry B. Hutchins, Mrs. Victor C.
Vaughan, Mrs. Wilbert Hinsdale, vice-
presidents. Thirty-four of those pres-
ent became volunteers.
--Buy Victory Bonds -
TAU SIGMA DELTA
ELECTS FOUR MEN
Tau Sigma Delta, the honorary archi-
tectural and allied arts fraternity held
its annual election last Friday night at
the new Engineering building.
This society wasbegun at Michigan
about five years ago and schools
which had a national standing were
granted charters. The organization
has spread, with unusual rapidity
throughout the country.
Four men were elected to the so-
ciety at the Friday meeting, three se-
niors and one junior. The. seniors
were chosen from the 15 per cent high-
est scholarship average and the ju-
niors from the first quarter.
These men selected were: Harold
Kiefer, '19AE; Russell Larke, '19A;
Walter Nugent, '19A; and Emil Jehle,
'20A.
-- Buy Victory Bonds -
HARVARD MAY HAVE
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
An up-to-date gymnasium has been
suggested as fitting memorial to the
war dead of Harvard. The building
will have a swimming pool and hockey
rink.

MORTAROARD TO
HOLD CONVENTION

CAMPUS SALES DECLINE
TO $2,500 THURSDAY
City Campaign Closed But Campus Has
One More Day to Raise
Hoped For Total
"Buy Victory bonds."
Michigan failed to do this and to
uphold their record of the first two
days of the fifth Liberty Loan drive
when subscriptions to the amount of
only $2,500 were taken Thursday.
With the end of the campaign Friday,
every effort is being expended by the
general committee to make the last
day the biggest of thee drive. The
total subscriptions taken -so far total
$37,550 which is below the amount
the committee expected to raise.
In consequence of this the commit-
tee urges the class presidents to see
that their workers are busy urging
people to buy bonds. For the last time
the student committee headquarters in
the registrar's office will be open at
9' o'clock Friday morning, and at 5
o'clock the opportunity to buy bonds
here will be gone.
Special Effort Friday
Commenting upon the results of the
third day of the drive Ralph. Gault,
'21L, chairman of the general commit-
tee, said, "In the last day of the drive,
we are going to endeavor to raise a
sum of which Michigan may be justly
proud. The amount of bonds sold
Thursday was a disappointment, but
it will not discourage us from bigger
efforts in our final attempt Friday.'
Thursday marked the close of the
city volunteer campaign when the
banks volunteered to take the part
of Ann Arbor's quota, then unsubscrib-
ed. This does not mean that the cit-
izens of Ann Arbor will not have the
opportunity to invest their money in
bonds, for they may still do so at the
banks.
University Campaign Not Over
The closing of the city campaign did
not affect the University camaign in
mny way except that sone students
thought the campaign in the Univer-
sity was through, which is not so.
This is not the case, for the cam-
paign will not end until Friday night,
and during the remaining day the ef-
forts to raise a larger sum will be
unremitting.
"They're watching Michigan's rec-
ord."
S -- Buy Victory Bonds -
VALUABLEAND ANCIENT
RUGS SHOWN AT UNION

National Women's Honor Society to
Begin Biennial Meeting
Tonight
BANQUET ARRANGED FOR THIS-
EVENING BY THIS CHAPTER
With Michigan chapter as hostess,
the first biennial convention of Mor-
tarboard, national honorary society for
senior women, will begin at 6:30
Friday night with a banquet in the
Michigan Union. Arrangements have
been made for 48 people, including the
20 active members, 10 visiting dele-
gates, and 18 alumnae members from
Detroit and Ann Arbor.
National Organization
The local chapter was established in
the University in 1906. In June, 1918,
it sent representatives to a convention
at Swarthmore college, Pennsylvania,
and in their adoption of the present
charter, occurred the first step toward
the nationalization of the society. In
place of a Greek letter name, Motor-
board, the title of the Michigan chap-
ter, was adopted, and the membership
requirements, scholarship, leadership,
and personality, were made nationally
uniform. That the vitality of the or-
ganization is assured for the future, is
evident in the number of petitions to
be presented at the convention here.
Program Announced
The program for tonight's banquet
is as follows:.
Toastmaster, Groeso Gaines, '19;
Response, Huldah Bancroft, '15; His-
tory of National Mortarboard, Emily
Loman, '19; Swarthmore college chap-
ter, Miss Isabel Myers; Ohio State
university chapter, Miss Anna Cor-
nell; University of Illinois chapter,
Miss Marie Croisen; Cornell univer-
sity chapter, Miss Helen Spalding;
-University of Minnesota, Miss Ada
Brown; University of Missouri, Miss
Mary Logan.
-Buy Victory Bonds
"Y" WILL OPEN CAMPAIGN TO
INTEREST HIGH SCHOOL MEN
To create a wider interest in the
University, and tobring to the high
school men of the state an idea of
what the institution stands for, the
University Y. M. C. A. will open a
campaign next week for the estab-
lishment of sectional clubs.
Efforts will be made to secure ac-
tive organizations of the men 'from the
various towns. Notice will be sent
out to these men by the "Y," which
will take charge of the meetings until
definite arrangements can be made.

Oriental rugs, amounting in' value
to nearly half a million dollars, are
being shown under the auspices of
the Ann Arbor Art association April.
24, 25, and 26 in the new Union.
This collection is said to be the
largest of any now in existence due
to scarcity of rugs as a result of the
war. In many of the oriental coun-
tries, particularly Armenia, where rug-
weaving has been for centuries one
of the major arts, that industry is vir-
tually destroyed.
By far the most valuable rug in. the
colection was a Saracenic masterpiece
from the Charles Yerkes collection. A
very old and rare Armenian specimen
worth $10,000 was also on exhibit.
This is a large rug with the Armenian
coat-of-arms, sometimes called a sun-
burst, woven twice in the design.
Prayer rugs, whose triangular de-
sign of pattern dlistinguishes them
from any other type of oriental rug,
were shown.
A price is set on all these specimens
so that they may be purchased by any-
one desiring to take advantage of this
unusual opportunity.
Buy Victory Bonds -
GRADUATE DISCHARGED FROM
FRENCH ARMY VISITS CITY
Kenneth Wesley, '18, visited Ann Ar-
bor Thursday. He was just recently
discharged from the French army in
which he was an asprant in the Field-
Artillery. Wesley left in June, 1917,
with the French ambulance unit from
Michigan in which he served on all the
fronts, including Verdun, until he
entered the American Red Cross am-
bulance corps.
He soon enlisted in the Frenqh army
and was sent to the artillery school
at Fountainbleau. Wesley graduated
from this in time to be sent to the
front in the last few days of the war,
during which his regiment was cited
four times for gallantry in action.

_

PIme. Cat1erine

21reshkovsky, The Little

Grandmother of

the Russian

Revolution

"Reclaiming Russia" and Dr. Edward H. Egbert, formerly Chief Surgeon of
TheOAmerican , Ted Cross Detachment in ussia
HILL AUDITORIUMr, TINES. APRIL 29, 8 P. At.

Tickets So Cents at Wahr's, Slater's, and Sheehan's.

Wox office Open at 7.30.

Auspices of Oratorical Ass'n.

.._N1

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