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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RAIN 0 SNOW
COLDER

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9£T

Ak1i yrn

:4I aitFl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WERE
SER VICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 141.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENT

PHI BTA AP
CHOSES 37 FROM
SEI OR LIT CL
INITIATION BANQUET IN MAY;
PROF. COOLEY TO GIE
ADDRESS
PROF. W. B. PILLSBURY
ELECTED PRESIDENT
Aaa Arbor Leads with Nine Students;
Detroit Follows with
Eight
Thirty-seven members of the senior
class were elected to Phi Beta Kappa,
the literary honor society, at a meet-
ing of the members of the local chap-
ter held Wedgesday afternoon. Twen-
ty-nine of those elected were women
and eight were men.
The elected members were chosen
from, a list of 468 names. Ann Arbor
leads all other cities in the number of
residents who were elected, having
nine. Detroit followed closely with
eight, and Saginaw, Bay City and To-
ledo each were represented with two.
Women Predominate
Following is the list of those
eiected:
. Jaes P. Adams, Carson City; Edith
B. Aiton, Detroit; Vera Andrus, Ann
Arbor; Hilda C. Annabelle, Battle
Creek; Margaret I. Anschuts, Bay
City; Gertrude R. Beerlein, Fort
Wayne, Ind.; I. Victor Brock, Oak
Park, Ill.; Edith Priscilla Butler,
Battle Creek; Harcourt L. Caverley,
Toledo, 0.; Chester C. Clark. Ann Ar-
bor; Miriam 0. Clarke, Detroit; Sally
Clarkson, Ann Arbor; Doris A. Cline,
Detroit; Helen I. Davis, Grand Rapids;
Florence A., Dee, Bay City; Emma L.
Duff, Grosse Isle; Hope E. Ferguson,
Birmingham; Blanche E. Goodell,
Ecorse; Edna I. Gordon, Ann Arbor;
Dorothy W. Grace, Detroit; Meta Marie
Henne, Ann Arbor; Marie K. Horning,
Saginaw; Eliza J. Kerr, Harbor
Springs; Rosa Kingsbury, Ann Arbor;
Margaret I. Lippincott, South Bend,
Ind.; Jean Maclennan, Seattle, Wash.;
Dorna E. Norton, Detroit; Lillian I.
Ottme', Ann Arbor; Morris Paris,
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Ella Rasmussen, De-.
trit; Hester Reed, Ann Arbor; Har-
old X. Shapero, Detroit; Walter R.
(4ontinued on Page Six)
--Buy Victory Bonds --
ENTHUIS EEA
NBUR A EI 0 CLUMB PLAN
m - . L
RETUBNIh AVIATORS ARE ALL
IN FAVOR OF
IDEA
Every former air service man, some
of them America's best, who has been -
interviewed on the organization of an
Aero club has voiced his hearty ap-
p1tal of the plan and is anxious to
see It materialize.
George S. Hodge, '19E, who served
in the naval air service And is credited
with sinking a U-boat, said, "I think
it a mighty fine idea. Eastern schools
ar starting such clubs and we mustt
not let Michigan get behind."I
George Ohrstrom, '19L, who saw
oversees service in the army air serv-
ice is "absolutely in favor of it" and
believes it is something that should be
pushed at Michigan.
Charles Keller, '21E, of the marine
air service said, "Great, I'll be at the
meeting."
C. 4. Smith of the army air service,
better known to the campus for his
football jbuity, offered, "I think it
very fine; I will support it."
Bruce Millar, city editor of the
Daily, a former member of the army
air service, is also enthusiastic and
is anxious to see it made 4 succes.

The meeting which is to be held at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the billard
room of the Michigan Union will be
the first chance that the former air
fighters and aeronautical students of
the University have had to get to-
gether.

NO NEED TO BOIL-
CITY WATER NOW
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of-
ficer, stated Wednesday that it was
no longer necessary to boil the city
water before using it for drinking.
"An average rainfall will not con-
taminate the water to such an extent
that the chlorine process, to which it
is subjected, cannot make it safe for
drinking purposes," said Dr. Wessin-
ger. "It is necessary to have an un-
usual rainfall, such as there was about
10 days ago, then one and one-half
inches of water fell, to contaminate the
water to this extent. This only oc-
curs about once or twice in the
course of a year," he went on to say.
It is expected that when the pump-
ing station at the Steer firm, which
is capable of delivering 4,000,000 gal-
lons every 24 hours, comes into use
that it will no longer be necessary to
use the river water, as the daily con-
sumption, under the meter system,
would only be about 2,000,000.
-Buy Victory Bonds --
us OF H.,AMBULANCE MEN
LN NDDA11 1y IN N Vo
TWENTY MEMBERS WEAR CROIX
DE GUERRE; UNIT CITED
TWICE
Of the 14,000 cheering soldiers that
arrived on the transports Easter Sun-
day morning in New York, the most
distinguished group was Ambulance
unit 591, composed entirely of Uni-
versity of Michigan men, who, having
left Ann Arbor in May, 1917, spent
13 months under fire with the French
army.
Unit Cited Twice
This unit of Wolverine ambulanciers
brought with them two citations for
bravery with the Fourth and Twenty-
ninth French divisions, won for brav-
ery in removing wounded at Chemin
des Dames, and north of Soisson, near
Juvigny. Twenty of the 45 members
of the unit the Croix de Guerre. One
ambulancier, Hugh W. McNair of
Houghton, received both the French
and the American war crosses. Fif-
teen of the 45 were maimed and in-
jured in action, and five were killed.
Bravery Under he
Most of the individual winners of
the Croix de Guerre received their dec-
orations for bravery displayed in
evacuating wounded under shell fire.
Among those wearing the French war
cross are:
Earl G. Dorfner, ex-'19L Ord, Neb.;
Harry N. Deyo, ex-'17L, Rockford;
Charles J. LaMarre, ex-'18E, Alpena;
Amos F. Paley, ex-'18L, Dubuque,
Iowa; Leon J. Regelma, ex-19,
Greenville, Pa.; Paul Wilcox, e'18,
Columbia City, Ind.; Walter H. Wist-
rand, ex-'18P, Menominee; Clyde *.
Kammerer, ex-'20, St. Louis, Mo.;
Hugh McNair, son of the president of
the Michigan College of Mines at
Houghton; Harold McGregor, Ann Ar-
bor; Linton B. Diamond, '16, St. Johns,.
a former Daily man; and Charles B.
Cummings, brother of Dr. H. H. Cum-
wings of Ann Arbor.
All-Michigan Unit
Ambulance unit 591 was the only
All-Michigan unit in the field for any
length of time. It was organized at
the University in May, 1917, and sent
to Allentown, Pa., with two other am-
bulance units from Michigan. Unit
591, was, however, the only one of the
three which reached France in time
to see service.
On Oct. 18, 1917, the section arrived
at the front and served in the Ar-
gonne sector between Hill 304 and Le
Morte Homme (Dead Man's Hill), at1
the extreme left of the Verdun sector.-
In February, 1918, the unit went "en
repos" with the fourth Division of the
second Army corps of the French
army for three weeks and then moved
up ahead of Verdun, where the divi-
sion held the line around and includ-;
ing Donamont and Vaux. Here the1
"unit served steadily until September,t

1918, and was under fire constantly.
Aisne Front Next
In September the division left Ver-
dun for the Aisne front north of Sois-
sons and engaged in the terrific fight-
(Continued on Page Six)

"ITALY MUST NOT BE GIVEN FIUME" SAYS
WILSU IN ADRIATIC QUESTION MANIFESTO
'BULLETIN
Paris, April 23.-The Italian Vice-Admiral Thaon di Revel, former chief
of staff, has left Paris for Rome. General Diaz, commander-in-chief of the
Italian army. will leave tonight, it is announced.
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 23.-In a statement issued by President Wilson today
explaining his position on the Adriatic questeion he declared that Fiume can-
not become part of Italy. The president points out that every condition con-
cerning the Adriatic settlement has been changed since Italy entered the
war upon the promises of the Pact of London. He notes that since the
dismemberment of the Austro-Hungarian empire, new states have been
created for which Flume is the natural outlet to the sea.
The President also contends that the strategic necessity pleaded in be-
half of Italy's claim to the Dalmatian islands no longer prevails, as the
Austrian naval menace has ceased to exist.
Certain Definite Principles
In issuing the statement, President Wilson let it be known that he
called attention to the fact that there are certain definite principles which
the peoples have accepted as a basis for a lasting peace.
The United States delegation simply recalled this in order that there
should be no deviation from these principles.
Private Understanding
"When Italy entered the war," the President said, "she did so upon the
basis of a definite private understanding with Great Britain and France
now known as the Pact of London.
"Since that time the whole face of circumstances has been altered.
Many other powers, great and small, have entered the struggle with no
knowledge of that private understanding.
"The Austro-Hungarian empire, then the enemy of Europe, and at whose
expense the Pact of London was to be kept in the event of victory, has gone
to pieces and no longer exists. Not only that, but the several parts of that
empire, it is agreed now by Italy and all her associates, are to be erected
into independent states and associated in a League of Nations, not with
those who were recently our enemies, but with Italy herself and the powers
that stood with Italy in the great war for liberty.
To Establish Liberty
"We are to establish their liberty as well as our own. They are to
be among the smaller states whose interests are henceforth to be safeguard-
ed as scrupuously as the interests of the most powerful states.
"The war was ended, moreover, by proposing an armistice and peace
which should be founded on certain clearly defined principles which set up
.a new order of right and justice. Upon those principles the peace with
Germany has been conceived and formulated. Upon those principles it will
be executed.
/ One Basis of Peace
"We cannot ask the great body of powers to propose and effect peace
with Austria and establish a new basis of independence and right in the
states which originally constituted the Austro-Hungarian enmpire and in
the states of the Balkan group on principles of another kind. We must apply
the same principles to the settlement of Europe in those quarters that we-
have applied in the peace with Germany. It was upon the explicit avowal of
these principles that the initiative for peace was taken, and upon them
the whole structure of peace must rest.
Flume Not For Italy
"If those principles are to be adhered to, Fiume must serve as the out-
let of the com crce, not of Italy, but of land to the north and northeast of
that port: Hungary, Bohemia, Roumania, and the states of the new Jugo-
Slav group. To assign Flume to Italy would be to create the feeling that we
have deliberately put the port, upon which all those countries chiefly depend
for their access to the Mediterranean, in the hands of the powers of which it
did not form an integral part and whose sovereignity if set there must in-
evitably seem foreign, not domestic or identified with the commercial and
industrial life of the regions which the port should serve. It was for
that reason, no doubt, the Fiume was not included in the Pact of London
but definitely assigned to the Croatians."
Wheat Premier Orlando received President Wilson's statement this aft-
ernoon he immediately called a meeting of the Italian delegation. The meet-
ing was to prepare a statement on the situation to be addressed to the Italian
people.

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
(By Associated Press)
Tokio, April 23. -The impression
exists in well informed quarters here
that Japan will Join the League of
Nations even if the racial clause of
the league convenant is finally reject-
ed by the peace conference. This was
brought out in answer to special news
despatches from Paris asserting Japan
had informed the other delegates to
the conference that she would decline
to enter the league if the racial clause
was not adopted.
Copenhagen, April 23.-A state of
siege has been proclaimed in the im-
portant German port of Hamburg and
the suburbs of Alatona and Wands-
beck, according to . advices received
here from Hamburg. In consequence
of the disorders the police have re-
ceived orders to shoot persons carry-
ing arms, and fighting against the na-
tional police.
- Buy Victory Bonds -
NEW CHILDREN'S WARD
FILLED TO CPAC!TY
SOCIAL SERVICE IS UNDER WAY
AT HOMOEOPATHIC
HOSPITAL
Immediate use has been put to the
new children's ward of the Homoeop-
athic hospital.
Children ranging from infancy to
the eighth grade of the public schools
are sent here for all kinds of treat-
ment, both medical and surgical. Every
bed is now occupied and a waiting list
has been formed pending the arrival
of more beds. Dr. C. B. Stouffer of
the University Health service is in di-
rect charge of the new ward.
Dean Hinsdale Favors Plan
Welfare work, established through
the efforts of the Homoeopathic guild,
is being c rried on in connection with
the work'of the hospital. The guild
has the sympathy and hearty co-opera-
tion of Dean Hinsdale of the Homoeop-
atbic Medical school and is composed
of many influential Ann Arbor women
who are interested in the work being
done.
The welfare staff is not yet com-
plete, but those already on it are: Mrs.
H. S. Mallory, general welfare direc-
tor; the hospital receiving officer,
whose name is to be announced later;
Miss Genevieve Reed, supervisor of
nurses; Miss R. Dible, head nurse in
the maternity ward; Mrs. C. V. Kent,
representative of the guild; Mrs. John
MacGregor, representative of the Bap-
tist circle of Kings' Daughters; and
Miss Ruble Mann, director of the ed-
ucational work.
Children Educated
Education of the children while they
are in the'hospital is one of the prin-
cipal duties of the Welfare club. Les-
sons are held during the day for chil-
dren from the first through the sev-
enth grade. Miss Mann is directing the
work under the supervision of Prof.
Allen S. Whitney of the University's
educational department. Besides tu-
toring pupils in the grade school so
that they will not lose out while con-
fined in the hospital, elementary work
is taken up in a kindergarten and sub-
kindergarten for very small children.
Vocational Training
Scientific recreation with a view to
vocational training is also managed
by the Welfare club. Both the boys
and girls are interested in gardening,
chicken-keeping and birdhouse build-
ing, which is being taught them by stu-
dents of the University who have vol-
unteered to help the club in this man-
ner. It has been found that children
are much more contented and recover
faster if some such form of amuse-
ment is offered whichskeeps them busy
and is educational as well..
The Baptist circle of Kings' Daugh-
ters takes charge of the religious pro-
gram on Sundays. Ite isalso carrying
out a course of 10 lessons in bird
study for the more advanced children.
Works for Girls, Too

Recreational and educational volun-
teer work among the girls is being
done by Miss Huldah Bancroft, secre-
tary of the Y. W. C. A. Among the
boys, the work is supervised by J. E.
(Continued on Page Six)

VICTOR Y BONDS'
SOLD O-NLY TWO
DAYS LONGER
CHANCE TO BUY IN UNIVERSITY
' CLOSED AFTER FRIDAY
EVENING
WEDNESDAY SEES CITY
EXCEED GIVEN QUOTA

Banks, Realising Good
Take Most of City's
Remaining

Investment,
Bonds

ANN ARBOR LOAN TO DATE 1

University volunteer sub-
scriptions.........$ 35,000.00
City volunteer subscrip-
tions.............. 365,000.00
Bank volunteer subscrip-
tions .............711,629.00
Total..........$1,111,629.00
Single largest University
subscription, (Adie C.
Arnold, '19)....... $15,000.00
Single largest city sub-
scription ............$10,00.00

I

"Buy Victory Bonds."
With two volunteer days to come
and two volunteer days passed, the
sale of bonds already aggregates $35,-
000 in the University. Despite the
heavy rain in the afternoon, which
prevented many coming, $21,000 of
bonds were sold Wednesday, ;which,
added to the $14,000 raised Tuesday,
makes $35,000.
The volunteer days in the University
have been extended to include Friday,
but Friday evening at 5 o'clock the
opportunity to buy bonds at the reg-
istrar's office will be gone. During
the remaining three days, the commit-
tee hopes to raise Michigan's sub-
scription to $60,000.
City Campaign Closed
Wednesday night closed the active
campaign in the city for the sale of
Victory bonds. Approximately $365,-
000 in bonds were sold by volunteer
subscriptions at the "Victory Temple"
on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
of this week, and although the Liber-
(Continued on Page Six)
--Buy Victory Bonds -
DEAN EFFINGER SPEAKS
TO CEACLE FRANCAIS
Sketching brieny tne works of Vic-
torien Sardou and outlining in more.
deatil his play "Nos Intimes!" which
is to be given here by the Cercle
Francais on May 1, Dean John R. Ef-
finger gave the last lecture of the
year before the Cercle in English.
Dean Effinger said that "Nos In-
times!" may really be divided into
two parts. First the plot, which is a
love story, and secondly the charact-
ers which really make the play. "Nos
Intimes !", with an exclamation point
after the title has the intention of un-
derlining the word "Intimes," is a
story dealing with supposedly intimate
friends who are struggling under the
weight of gratitude.
Sardou wrote the play in 1861 and it
met with immediate success, in fact so
great that Sardou. fainted after the
initial performance. He also wrote
plays which were spectacles more than
any thing else, one of these being set
in Petrograd and Paris, another in
Italy, and still anotheV in Bizantium
at the time of Justinian. These plays
depend upon scenic effects and stage
direction for their success, littletde-
pending upon the words. This is not
the case in "Nos Intimes!", in which
the characters are the most important
part.
Sardou was 30 years old when he
wrote the play. In 1887 he was admitted
to the French academy. This was one
case where a clever playwrite, not a
man of letters, was admitted.

CAPTAIN 1. A. WEST, '20K,
RETURNS WITH D. S. C.

BAND 'WILL PLAY FOR
DETROIT LOAN DRIE

ONE

OF FIRST MARINES
TIVELY ENGAGED IN
FIGHTING

AC- ORGANIZATION 'WILL LEAVE FRI-
DAY TO AID CITY
CAMPAIGN

Capt. John A. West, '20E, partici-
pant in much of the fighting done by
the Marines, and winner of the Dis-
tinguished Service Cross for excep-
tional bravery shown on the battle
field, has recently returned from
France and has been in Ann Arbor.
Captain West enlisted in the Ma-
rines in 1917, leaving the Engineering
college shortly after. Upon receiving
his commission as second lieutenant,
he was sent over to complete his
training and was shortly afterwards
detailed to the front line trenches.
His battle experiences have been
many and varied. The first real ex-
perience was at Chateau Thierry,
where with little sleep and food only
when those bringing it were fortu-
(Continued on Page Six)

Michigan's Varsity band takes an-
other trip.
Leaving for Detroit at 7 o'clock Fri-
day morning, the band will make its
third trip in behalf of the Liberty
loan, and the second trip within a
week. When they arrive in Detroit,
they will be met at the station by a
delegation of Detroiters.
Plans Indefinite
Although nothing is definitely known
as/to when or where they will play,
it is expected that they will play for
a noon luncheon at the Chamber of
Commerce and in some parade.
The band will return to Ann Arbor
Friday evening. Every man will be
taken on the trip who can go. En-
tertainment will be provided in De-
(Continued on Page Six)

U - U

Friday
May 2
8 p.m.
15 cents

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
presents UNIQUE VAUDEVILLE

All

Nation

Hullabaloo

Tickets from
Club members
Wahr's
Cus hing's
Quarry's
Sheehan's
Calkins
Delta

IN

0

HILL AUDITORIUM

rrr _ _U

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