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April 22, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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V.

|IGHT WEATHER [HELPS
VIRSITY BA1LL TOSSERS

FAST PRACTICE MONDAY
LOWED BY GOOD
CONDITIONS

AL.

Fine weather gave the baseball
team an opportunity to hold one of
the best practices of the year yester-
day afternoon.
With the diamond in excellent con-
dition on account of the sun which
furnished heatthat made the tem-
perature exactly right, a full after-
noon's work was put in. Coach Lund-
gren is getting ready for the Ypsi-
lanti game Wednesday. While he does
not worry over the outcome of the
game, it is certain tiat the Ypsi men
have a stronger team than the Case
outfit which thesWolverines vanquish-
ed so easily last Saturday.
Ypsl Has Good Heavers
The two pitchers which the visit-
ors will bring with them tomorrow
are said to be of a type which should
furnish Lundgren's men some real
opposition. These two men, Powers
and Carlson; were in the South Mich-
igan league and are the hope of the
Normal fans.I
The Michigan line-up has not yet
been given out but it is safe to sur-
mise that it will be for the most part
simiar to the list for last Saturday.
"Smalley" Morrison, veteran of
last year, and one of. the dependable
players on Michigan's champion base-
ball last year, was out in uniform yes-
terday. He worked for several hours
with the men while they were at bat-
ting practice.- The players distributed
themselves promiscuously about the
field and nabbed off the grounders and
flies which were knocked out by the
coach.
Heavy Batting Practice
Batting was given emphasis during
the whole afternoon. The coach gave
the men a lecture on bunting, which
seemed to correct the weaknesses of
many immediately. "Few men come
out that know kefore hand the correct,
method of bunting. It is not difficult
to learn, and once learned is never
forgotten," said the coach.
Pheney has shown up particularly
well with the stick of late. He is con-
sidered one ofsthe most dependable
men at bat.
Ingalls and Vick, two freshmen,
worked with the Varsity squad last
night. Ingalls is a pitcher who ought
to be a great addition to the yearling
team while Vick, 'who seems to be one
of those year-round athletes, was per-
fectly at home behind the plate.,
Cooper has recuperated from the
blow he received in the back while
sliding home in the Case game. He
also handled the stick in fine form,
his work last Saturday attracting at-
tention.
--Buy Victory Bonds --
CONNECT WITH THE CONNECTICUT
MUTUAL
Life Insurance Co., organized 1846, My
educational course free to the right
graduate. Don't see me unless you
think you are a salesman. J. Fred
Lawton, '11, General Agent, 610 Far-
well Building, Detroit.-Adv.

Training Large Nui
Object Of Na
(By T. F. McAllister)t
With the meeting of the various1
class managers last night under thef
supervision of Doctor May, physicalf
director of the University, the massf
athletic system is inaugerated at Mich-I
igan.
First introduced at the University ofE
Illinois, with the aim of interesting
as many students as possible in out-
door athletic work of a less strenuous
nature than Varsity work, the system1
met with great success and favor from
the first, and was soon taken up byl
many of the leading colleges and uni-
versities of the country, resulting inl
keen athletic rivalry among the stu-
dent bodies.
Of ingenious conception, the mass1
system of athletics enables a great
number of students,-who have not suf-
ficient time, or lack the skill necessary1
for the Varsity squads, to compete
actively in open contests against ath-
letic representations from their col-
legiate rivals. All the students wish-
ing to compete, train and practice
throughout the year, on their athletic
grounds, and in the spring a competi-
tive university meet is held, each uni-
versity supervising its own meet. Tak-
ing then as the score, the number of
points made by the 200, highest in
standing, the result is averaged and
wired into the central office of the col-
leges engaged. The college scoring
the highest average of points wins the
meet.
Adopting this system is one step
further than the intramural method
in the plan to engage the greatest pos-
sible number of students in active
sports and games. Since the develop-
ment of the latter system under Mr.
Floyd Rowe, lately director of Intra-
mural athletics, much enthusiasm has
been shown in the interclass games
and meets. However, since Mr. Rowe
left to take charge of war athletics,
some uncertainty has beenamanifested
in this regard. With the war, the sys-
tem suffered greatly, and is not now
in its former efficient condition.
Feeling the seriousness of the sit-
uation, and recognizing that even the
intramural plan was not perfect, the
Board in control of Athletics in its
recent report to the Regents describel
NET MEN TO MEET
DETROIT SATURDAY
Candidates for the Varsity tennis
team showed great improvement in
the matches Monday afternoon. Coach
Mack was pleased with the playing of
most of the men. A squad will be
picked to play the Detroit Tennis club
next Saturday.
In the matches up to date keen com-
petition has been displayed. Saturday
Muntz beat Bowers 6-2, Bartz tied
Muntz, Bowers beat Towler 6-1, and
defeated Harrison 6-2. Bowers then
tied Bartz and Popp, and defeated
Muntz 6-4. Bartz beat Towler 6-2,
Leung beat Goorin 6-1, Harrison de-
feated Leung and Popp 6-3, and 6-4.
Yesterday afternoon the playing of
Bartz was very good and Bowers
showed exceptional ability in placing
his shots. Bowers defeated in succes-
sion Harrison 6-1, Bowers 6-2, Towler
6-2, and G. E. Dyason 6-0. Bowers
beat Leung 6-2, and Dyason defeated
,Leung 6-1.
In the doubles Freedman and Tow-
ler defeated Harrison and Popp 6-2,
Dyason and Baer lost to Cohn and
Towler 6-1, Bowers and Towler tied
Dyason and Baer, Prather and West-

brook defeated Popp and Harrison 7-5,
and Freedman and Jerome beat Hitch-
cock and Whitker 6-1.
After playing Detroit next Saturday,
another match will be played with To-
ledo Tennis club before the matches
with Ohio State. Practice will be held
today at 2:30 p. m.

ember Of )en Is |
;ss AthleticM eets
the situation, and suggesting various
means to accomplish the end, asked
for additional suggestions. The result
is the mass athletic system, coming
from the board and put into execution
by it.
No discussion seems properly open-
ed these days without observing the
Osson taught by the war in regard to
this matter. While it cannot be said
that the war has disclosed the need
of a more comprehensive system of
physical education, certainly the war
and the mobilization have em-
phasized such a need. Criticism of
intercollegiate athletics usually comes
down to the basic charge that too few3
receive the benefits of the training; it
is said that colleges should provide
some system whereby all, or at least,
many, could be developed. Thus one
(Continued on Page Six)I
All candidates for the fresh-
man tennis squad report to 1
'Coach Reindel at Ferry Field at
2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
i i

SPRING FOOTBALL DRILL
OPENS AT FERRY FIELD
COACH MITChELL TO DIRECT
WORK OF GRIDIRON
SQUAD
Spring practice for the Varsity
football men begins at 4 o'clock this
afternoon at Ferry field.
Coach Mitchell, in charge of the
practice, urges all of the men to be
on hand as he is. desirous of getting
things started as soon as possible.
These workouts will take place every
Tuesday and Thursday, and will con-
sist mostly of drilling on forward pass-
ing and kicking.
The coach says, "The purpose be-
hind this work will be to furnish an
opportunity to the men to come out
and go over the fundamentals of the
game again, thus saving much time
in the fall. This spring work counts
a great deal towards the final selec-
tion later and the proper spirit must
be shown."
All men who expect to be candi-
dates for the eleven next year, except
those now engaged in a major sport,
will report.
- Buy Victory Bonds -
The Michigan Daily for the rest of
the year, $1.00.-Adv.

100 Tennis Rackets to select from at The Daily is your paper-suppc
Waher's University Book Store.--Adv.J it.--Adv.

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Medics Notice

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BLOOD COUNTERS

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Military or. Naval Service

J-HOP PICTURES

of the Country

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COI. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE

The Faculty of the Law School of the University of Michigan
has arranged a special course for the Summer Session of 1919 and
the first semester of the year 1919-1920, in which course the stu-
dent is allowed to carry an amount of workslightly in excess of
the normal amount and thus gain the equivalent of a year of
credit. The saving of time for students who may be discharged
from the army or navy before June 23 will thus be considerable
and of great importance in aiding them to secure early admis-
sion to the bar. The course will include all subjects of the reg-
ular curriculum and will be given in the regular way by the Law
School Staff.
Students desiring to take advantage of this course must pr-
sent official evidence of their military or naval service.
For particulars address the Dean of the University of Michi-
gan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. Saturday night until 2 A. M.
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