100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 22, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARNER

"Olow PF

Sir o

Iat

ASSOCIATED
PRES
DAY ANID NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 139.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENT

_ - ,

SENiOHS APPEAR
I CAP AND GOWN
FIRST TIME TOAY
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHINS
WILL SPEAK AT SENIOR
EXERCISES
LINE OF MARCH FORMS
AT UNIVERSITY HALL
Block M Will Be Formed by Seniors
Marching in' Procession of
Classes

/

Remember .

Remember-that over there they ended the war that might have cost
us five times as much. If the war were not over, you would not hesitate
to lend your money to help end it. Why hesitate now?
Remember-you can never hope to equal them in heroism and valor.
But you can show your appreciation of what they have done, by helping your
country in a material way.
Remember-it is a point of honor to pay one's debts. You pay your
personal debts. Now help your country pay its national debt. If the
country fails in this, you will be to blame.-
Remember-Germany raised an immense loan a few months before de-
feat. Are we going to fail now, after our glourious victory? A year agoc
you were praying for peace. Now pay for it.
Remember-how much -you admire those service chevrons. Now
is your chance to get one for yourself. It will show that you are a true
patriot.
Remember-"If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep-thoagh poppies bloom
In Flanders Fields."
Remember-the VICTORY LIBERTY LOAN begins on the campus to-
day.

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
(By Associated Press)
New Yark, April 21.-German troops
have attacked the American Red
Cross mission at Kovno, Lithuania, ac-
cording to a cablegram received here
today by the Lithuanian National
council from its Paris representative.
The message gave neither the time nor,
result of the attack. A Lithuanian
soldier was killed in defending the
Americans.
Berne, April 21.-After a short siege
by Bavarian and Wurttemberg troops
the communists in Lindau, on Lake
Constance, have been defeated com-
pletely, according to messages receiv-
ed here from the Bavarian frontier.
The government which had been set
up by the communists has been over-
thrown.
Paris, April 21.-The naval port of
Sebastopol, in the Crimea. The Bol-
sheviki are said to be slackening their
advance in the face of the Allied artil-
lery fire.
Buy Victory Bonds-
CAR O FESTIAL
A, TISTE PHENOMENAL

THEY'RE WATCHING MICHIGAN'S
RECORD, BUY VICTORY BONDS;
CA~MPUS CAMPAIGN BEGINS T[

Senior caps and gowns will appear
on the campus"for the first time this
year at 4 o'clock today when the en-
tire senior class swings out.
Program at 4 O'clock
The seniors of the various colleges
will march into University hall in
their respective order for the -exer-
cises. The program is as follows:
Invgcation....Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas
Solo......Robert J. McCandkiss, '21M
Accompanied by Burton A. Garling-
house, '20
Address.. President Harry B. Hutchins
Song, "Varsity." Ensemble led by
Mr. Harrison of the School
.... . . .. .. .. ..of Music
Benediction....Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas
Line of March Given
Literary students and foresters will
line up promptly at 4 o'clock on the
walks of University hall and the Mu-
seum. Engineers and architects are
to assemble on the walk between Uni-
versity hall and the flag pole. The
laws, the pharmics, the homoeops,
dents, and the graduate students will
form in line on the walk between Uni-
versity hall and the Law building.
After the exercises Laurel A. Lund-
quist, senior lit president, will lead:
the march through the front doors of
University hall to State street, fol-
lowed- by the senior lit women and the
other classes in order. The block M
will be formed by marching up State
street to north University, froc there
to the flag pole, then to the Barbour
gymnasium and north University, and
finally down east University to the
Engineering building.
Inside in Case of Rain
In case of rain the seniors will as-
semble in the corridors of University
hall, where places will be assigned to
them by the student council committee
in charge.
--Buy Victory Bonds -
UMEBREOISHKDYSKI HIS
SEEN SIBERIAN EXIE

SHOULD HAVE AERO
CLU ALWK

WILSON BR INGS ON
IT9lIAN CRISIS

Hopes to Make It Serve
as National Society
Country

Community
Serves

Threatens

to Issue Statement
Deadlock Is
Prolonged

If

"LITTLE

GRAND1OTHER OF RUS-
SIA IS SPEAKER
HERE

BELIEVES SUCH ORGANIZATION
WOULD BE OF GREAT BENEFIT
"The University of Michigan, one of
the only two schools in this country
giving courses in aeronautical engi-
neering and having such a splendid
war record of its men who have served
in the air service should by all means
have an Aero club," said Prof. F. W.
Pawlowski of the aeronautical engi-
neering department when asked what
he thought of the organization of such
a olub here.
Professor Pawlowski believes that
such an organization consisting of
every one in the University interest-
ed in aviation and those who have
served in the various flying units
would be beneficial.
' Of Value to Ex-Airmen
Through the club they could keep
posted on the current developments in
this line, study the latest problems and
in this manner make ,it a headquar-
terstfor the men who have served in
aviation.
Professor Pawlowski's ideal club
would be open to all interested in
aeronautics, students of aviation and
service men whether commissioned or
not. He would have a club well bal-
anced both technically and socially,
technically for the students and so-
cially for the former flyers.
Mould Advertise University
Selfridge aviation field will continue
to train men for the air service and
cross country flights will no doubt be
made, a .club in Ann Arbor could en-
courage the flyers to stop here, en-
tertain them and these men from ev-
ery part -of the country would carry
the Michigan spirit to their home towns
and advertise the University.
A similar club was started in 1912
and survived about five years. The
members built models and gliders but
there were no practical airmen here
at the time and a Wright hydro air-
plane given the club by a Mr. Alger
of Detroit was smashed within a few
days after it had been set up.
Club Started Soon
Anyone interested in the organiza-
tion of such a club may call at Pro-
fessor Pawlowski's office, 333 Engi-
neering building and if enough prove
to be interested a meeting will be.
called soon. Professor Pawlowski
will assist in the launching of the
club but wants -it to be a student af-
fair and does not wish to assume
charge.
- Buy Victory Bonds -- .
BACK NUMBER OF GARGOYLE
APPEARS ON SALE TOMORROW
April 23 is to be a historic date for
The Gargoyle. The largest number of
its career, 40 pages, appears tomor-
row.
Kelsey Guilfoil, '20L, acted as edi-
tor of this issue. It is called the Back
Number, and the idea is carried
throughout its pages in puns and in
jests upon old times, old customs, and
old institutions. Inspired by the idea,
the a'rt editor "came back" with a
cover design as good as his last one
which was one of the hits of the Hop-
era Number...

BROCKDORF-RANTAU TO HEAD
GERMAN DELEGATION OF SIX
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 21.- The Italian ques-
tion reached a culminating phase to-
day when President Wilson refrained
from attending the meeting of the
Council of Four and consulted with the
other members of the American dele-
gation concerning the advisability of
issuing a public statement.
The President later joined the coun-
cil but it was said he would issue a
public statement if the deadlock was
prolonged.
The council of foreign ministers ap-
proved the proposed provision of the
treaty intended to forestall any effort
the Germans might make to re-estab-
lish a military machine by utilizing
outside forces. The article prohibits
the sending of German military in-
structors to foreign countries.
Paris, April 21. - The German del-
egation at Versailles will comprise six
high personages at the heat of which
will be Count Von Brockdorf-Rantzau,
the foreign minister.
Marshal Foch was so informed this
evening, says official announcement.
The delegates cannot arrive before
April 28.
- Buy Victory Bonds

Sophomores Set
Prom For Mlay

2G

Mme. Breshkovsky, "little grand-
mother of the Russian revolution," who
is to speak at Hill auditorium at 8
o'clock Tuesday evening, April 29, is
well qualified to deal with questions:
concerning Russia, for she has the'
true understanding of the Russian sit-
uation. She understands the Russian
people as only one can who has spent
years in Siberian prisons and camps.
Mme. Breshkovsky speaks, not as a
dispassionate onlooker, but as one
who has lived, suffered and fought
under an oppressive political regime.
The present lecture tour which
Mme. Breshkovsky is making in
America is not her first. Her first
tour was made some 15 years ago.
At that time she was recdr nized and
greeted as one who had cnsecrated
her life to the great cause of Russian
freedom.
Hardships and privationes have not
impaired the splendid intellect of the
"little grandmother." Though she is
now 75' years old, she is the same vig-
orous, active worker as in days long
past.
- Buy Victory Bonds -
1,000 COPIES OF INLANDER
DISTRIBUTED TO FRESHMEN
More than 1,000 copies of The In-
lander have been distributed among
the freshmen of the University during
the past two weeks. The Inlander
staff had the copies printed especially
for the purpose and distributed them
upon the campus in order to ac-
quaint the student body with the char-
+ nP -, P m m.zaz 0

Sophomores of all the schools and
colleges- of the University will hold
their annual Soph prom on Friday
night May 2, at the Armory.
The 1919 Prom will be an informal
affair, and as planned, will eclipse
most of the affairs of the past few
war years. Men are to wear white
trousers. Extensive arrangements are
being made for decorating the Armory
and for providing refreshments.
Music will be furnished by Roy;
Bardy's eight-piece orchestra from
Toledo which is known as Toledo's'
best. The favors will be small leath-
er card-cases.
Tickets .for the Proma will cost $4.00
plus the war tax. Reservations should
be addressed at once to Edward Ush-
er, 806 Hill street. The number of
tickets is limited to 175.
- Buy Victory Bonds --
FRESHMAN ENGINEERS ARRANGE
INFORMAL DANCE FOR MAY 16
Engineers of the class of 1922 will
frolic on the night of Friday, May 16,
at the Armory. The dance will be in-
formal and the number of couples will
be limited to 160.
The chairman of the social commit-
tee, Eugene Harbeck, has appointed
the following chairmen to assist in the
arrangements: chairman of the com-
mittee for decorations and refresh-
ments, Mary Hirth ; and chairman of
the music committee, Russell S.
Persing.
--Buy Victory Bonds -
MEMBERS OF CLASSICAL CLUB
HOLD RECEPTION THURSDAY
An informal reception for the mem-
bers of the Classical club will be held
at 7:45 o'clock Thursday night in the
basement, of Alumni Memorial hall.

YOUNG PRIMA DONNA
INTO OPERA IN
MONTHS

SINGS WAY
FIVE

Rising from a singer in the movies,
in cabaret, in vaudeville, to grand
opera in the incredibly short space of'
,five months has been the unique'
achievement of-Rosa Ponselle, the 23-
year-old prima donna of the Metro-s
politan opera house, who sings sev-
eral arias in the first concert Wed-
nesday evening at the May festival,
which takes place May 14 to 17 in Hill
auditorium.
Willed to Succeed
Miss Ponselle is another of those1
geniuses who without wealth, influ-:
ence, or educational opportunities hasI
nevertheless attained a pre-eminent
position in the artistic world by means#
of unusual equipment and the will to
do in face of every obstacle.
1 She was born in Meridian, Conn., of
Italian parentage. Her childhood was
spent with meager opportunities for
artistic development. She first sang
as soloist in church. In the spring of
-1918 she was booked at a New York
vaudeville in a "sister act" with her
sister, Camela. In the audience one
day there happened to be a man named
William Thorner, well known vocal
instructor in New York. He was im-
pressed by the voices of the girls, es-E
pecially that of Camela, and offered to I
tutor her. Shortly after her sister be-t
gan her studies Rosa became restless,t
deciding that she wanted to study, al-
so. Although it was against the judg-
ment of the maestro to accept two pu-
pils from the same family, Mr. Thorner
finally consented, and Rosa began her
arduous duties in company with herc
sister.
Caruso Hears SistersC
Mr. Thorner set his pupil at sev- t
eral operatic arias and then arrangedr
a soiree for the sisters. The musical
cognoscenti were there and declaredv
that Caruso should hear Rosa.-
Not long after that the great tenort
confirmed the opinion of the others.
Mr. Gatti-Casazza, general manager of8
the Metropolitan, engaged her at once
after hearing her sing. Miss Ponselle.
was not engaged for minor roles butI
made her debut last November oppo-J
site the great Caruso in the premierI
performance of Verdi's opera "La For- '
za del Destino."
First Western Appearance
At her first concert appearance out-
side of New York, which will be the
ay festival, she will sing:
Overture-"The Russian Easter,"
Op. 36........Rimsky-korsakow
Aria-"O Patria Mia" (Aida)....Verdic
Symphony, B flat ............ Chausson
Aria-Un bel Di ("Madame But-
terfly) ...................PucciniI
"Norwegian Rhapsody"... ....LaloI
Aria--"Bird Song" (Pagliacc)a...a%
.~Leuncavalo
March and Hymn to Democracy..Stock
- Buy Victory Bonds -- I
Student Council Meets Tonight A
An important business meeting of N
the student council will be held at 7 1
o'clock Tuesday evening in the new I
Union building. All members must be %
present.

MUST STILL BOIL WATER I
City water must still be boil-
ed before drinking, stated Dr. J.
A. Wessinger, city health officer.
Although the water has cleared
up somewhat in color since the
storm of last week it is still con-
taminated.
PROFS BRUMM SHARES
YASITYSAND HONORS'
APPLAUSE GREETS UNIVERSITY
CONTRIBUTIONS TO LIBERTY
LOAN DRIVE
Prof. John R. Brumm and the Var-
sity band divided honors on the trip,
to Saginaw for the Victory Loan drive
Saturday and Sunday.
Professor'Brumm was the principal
speaker at three meetings, at one of
which he took the place of Ambassa-
dor Gerard, and at all of these he re-
ceived enthusiastic welcomes.
Band Gives Concerts
The Varsity band played at these
three meetings, in one parade, and
gave two concerts on Sunday.
It led the parade of the district
chairmen Saturday afternoon and was
welcomed with applause at every cor-
ner. In the papers of Saginaw the
band received columns of print and its
(name was mentioned in the headlines,
many times.
Admitted to Theaters
During their stay in the city their
uniorms admitted members of 'the
band to the theaters, and Saturday
afternoon they were entertained at the
East Saginaw club with a dance. Fol-
lowing their playing Saturday night at
the Bancroft House, they were guests1
of honor at the Jeffers theater.
* The band arrived in Ann Arbor
Mionday morning. It was scheduled to
play in Monroe, but this engagement,
was cancelled.
- Buy Victory Bonds -
MEMBERS OF VARSITY
GEE CLUB SELECTED
The Varsity Glee club has been sel-
ected by the director, Mr. Theodore
Harrison, and the list has been passed
upon by the Senate eligibility commit-
tee. Rehearsals will begin at 7
o'clock tomorrow night in the audi-
torium of Lane hall, the UniversityE
Y. M. C. A.E
The first public appearance of the
club will be at the Swing-out exer-
cises this afternoon in University hall.
There are enough men from last year's
club to give the numbers planned for
today's appearance, besides the new
men who were trained in the All-Fresht
club last year. The club will sing
with the Varsity band. It will as-]
semble at 4 o'clock in the right sec-
tion directly behind the band.
Those who constitute the Glee club
are: N. B. Bart, '19; R. E. Boes, '22;
C. R. Byrne, '19; J. M. Bailey, '20; M.-
L. Drake, grad.; H W. Galster, '21;
L. R. Gabell, '20; J. R. Ives, '21L; E. T.
Jones, '19; W. H. Johnston, '21; P.
R. Kempf, '20; E. S. Kingsfotd, '21;
V. F. Lancaster, '19; H. J. Lowry, '21;
W. M. Mackenson, '22; R. A. Mayer,
21; R. C. Morrison, '21; C. H. Mason,
20; C. P. Martzloff, '20; R. J. Mc-t
Coughey, '19; D. D.Nash, '20; C. R.
Osius, Jr., '20; H. J. Potter, '22; L. M.

Rutz, '20; R. L. Miller, '21E; M. E. Mc-
Gowen, '21E; F. S. Roser, '21E; H. J.
Schlee, '20E; J. V. Tracey, '20E; J. F.
Walker, '20E; F. A. Bothe, '21M; W.
C. Ellett, '21M; G. E. Gorker, '21M;
L. E. Holley, '21; V' L. Kemp. '22M;
P. M. Moore, '22M; R. M. McCandliss,
22M; C. McCormack, '22M; J. Palma,
'22M;. H. R. Ballard, '2011; J. C.
Shanks, '19D; H. A. Smith, '191); G.
B. Riker, '20D; B. Sherk%,, 21E; W.
M. Simpson, '20M; E. P, Smith, '19;
W. R. Stark, '19; J. M. Taylor, '19;
E. C. Upton, '20; L. R. VanNess, '20;
H. C. Walser, '21; H G. Whitcomb,
21; C. V. Wicker, '19, E W. Dunn, '20;
(Continued on Page Sl-)

CAMPUS ORGANIZES CORPS
WORKERS TO MANAGE
CAMPAIGN
REGISTRAR'S OFFICE
TAKES SUBSCRIPTIO

Will Be Headquarters for ReceiIa
Voluntary Subscriptions of
Students
"Buy Victory Bonds."
The opportunity to do this will be
given to all students of the Univer-
sity Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thurs-
day at the Victory Liberty Loan head-
quarters in the registrar's offile. Dur-
ing these three days, the general col-
mittee wants every one to volunteer.
Campaign Begins Today
Although the beginning of the cam-
paign was postponed from Monday to
Tuesday $1,050 worth of bonds were
sold without solicitation Monday by
voluntary subscriptions. The first bond
was sold to an instructor and the
second to a Chinese student.
Active work beginstTuesday. B
this timh. the presidents of all
classes are supposed to have appoint-
ed from eight to 10 assistants to work
up interest among the students. o-
ters have been placed at all advan-
tageous points on the campus. Speak-
ers have been obtained to speak at all
of the fraternity and sorority houses,
which number 72, either Tuesday or
Wednesday night.
Subscriptions will be taken at -tthis
time, but blanks will be left to fill
out. The committee in charge of this
work is Alexander Crockett, '19, chair-
man; Roy Stringer, '19; Dale Thomp-
son, '20; Roy Chandler, '19, and Wil-
liam Dorrance, '19E.
Raise Money Quickly
Students are asked to subscribe
Tuesday in order that Michigan may
stand high among the universities in
this drive. The committee is anxious
that the money be raised quickly.
The faculty is co-operating splendid-
ly with the general committee. In all
classes and lectures professors are
announcing the University drive and
many of the faculty are buying their
bonds at the University headquarters.
The subscriptions of the faculty will
be taken at the student headquarters.
Architeets Make Posters.
Work on the posters was done by
the architectural college Monday aft-
ernoon, where it was necessary to sus-
pend classes. At the committee eet-
ing Sunday afternoon plans and de-
tails for the drive were discussed.
Headquarters are open from 8 a. m.
until 5.30 p. m., where during the first
three days the committee wants every
student to volunteer with his sub-
scriptions.
"They're watching Michigan's ┬░ee.
ord."
Detroit, April 21. - Detroit raised
her victory banner over the city ll
tonight claiming the honor of beig
the first large city in the country to
oversubscribe its quota in the Victory
Liberty Loan. The city has not "fin-
ished the job" for the drive continues
and workers predict the total subscrip-
,tion will near the $100,000,000 mark.
Today's subscriptions exceeded $E0;-
000,000. The city's quota was $55,-
494,413.
- Buy Victory Bonds ---
TWO MORE NAMES ADDED TO
LIST OF PHI SIGMA INITIATES
The names of W. J. McGill, '19P,
and J. L. Hayman, 119P, were omit-
ted from the list of those to be initiated
into the Phi Sigma, national honorary
Piological society, sometime in May.
SENIOR LITS MEET TODAY
To appoint a class oratorto
fill the vacancy caused by E'a H.
Foss' resignation the senior lit
class will meet at 3:15 o'clock
today in room 101, Economics I

building. Samples of commence-
ment invitations will be on dis-
play. Caps and gowns will be
worn as after the meeting the
class will assemble for"the
Swing-out.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan