100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 18, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

i ,r

mitF

~3a itij

ASSOCIATED
PARES S
DAYX AND NIGUT '$ IRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 136.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 18. 1919.

PRICE THREE GENTS

.,Y .W.....,...._w

.

y

SEAMENDROWNED
WHEN TRANSPORT
SINKS NAA TUG
SAXONIA'S PROPELLER SLICES
OFF STERN OF SMALLER
VESSEL
EXACT NUMBER OF LOST
UNKNOWN; MAXIMUM 9
Returning Soldiers Aboard Troopship
Effect Rescues By Throwing
Ropes Overboard
(By Associated Press)
New York, April 17.-Several naval!
seamen were drowned here today when
the propeller of the transport Saxonia
sliced off the stern of the naval tug
Freehold while the smaller vessel was
docking the troopship at a Cunard pier.
The number of dead is not known, for,
while the tug carried a crew of 23 and
only 14 were rescued, shore leave had
been granted a number of the sailors.
The sinking of the tug was one of the
most dramatic marine accidents which
ever occurred here. The cheers, which
a moments before had been echoing
back and forth fromtransport to dock,
were suddenly hushed as on the stern
of the great vessel came the sound of
rending steel and wood.
Attempts At Rescue
The Saxonia's decks crowded to the
rail with returning troops well and
wounded alike, were the scene of
greatest confusion which lasted but
for an instant. Then quick thinking
fighting men alive to the hazards of
No-Man's Land put their thoughts in-
to action. Ropes were thrown over-
board and five seamen towed from the
Hudson.
Lives Saved py Tug
Meanwhile the naval tug Crawford
also engaged in warping the Saxonia
into her dock, went to the rescue and
saved three more lives. Police work-
ing from the pier rescued another three
and a rowboat, hastily launched from
the shore brought the total saved to
fourteen.
T g Sucked Under
Witnesses said that the commander
of the Saxonia evidently intended to
aid the tug by giving the larger craft
a kick ahead. The quick rush of wat-
er, however, sucked the tug under
the stern nd the Saxonia's 30-ton
propeller blade descended like a knife
on the stern of the smaller craft.
USE TRAINING FOR
SOCIETY - PARKER
"College men in general represent
a privileged class which presupposes
the assumption of responsibility," said
{Professor John C. Parker, head of the
electrical engineering department, in
a lecture to the junior engineering
assembly at 10 o'clock Thursday morn-
Ing.
"Since society has brought us what
attainments we have," he continued,
"we must pay society back. That
means engineers like other college
men must use their training in the
service of society and not of self."
He concluded by showing the meth-
ods and ways in which an engineer
may serve the public, and by saying
that the best training for one's life
work is application in college.
Four men, J. M. Darbaker, '20E,
Louis Schindler, '20E, J. T. Dickinson,
'20E, and W. F. Tschaeche, '20E, were
nominated for the honor committee.
Of these four, two will be elected in
the campus elections this spring.
Walter Nugent, '19E, gave a short
talk on the honor system. The next
and last junior engineer assembly will

be held May 22.
ARGENTINIANS PREPARING FOR
MAXIMALIST DEMONSTRATION
Buenos Aires, April 17.-The strike
of the agriculturalists in Argentina is
reaching alarming proportions, accord-
ing to reports received from the inter-
ior.
Buenos Aires, April 17.-Young Ar-
gentinians including the members of
the "January White Guard," are or-
ganizing and arming to combat the
Maximalist demonstration being pre-
pared for May 1. Two thousand are
already under arms and declare their
determination to deal vigorously with
the expected outbreak. If the demon-
stration assumes a revolutionary char-
acter it is expected to be counter-bal-
anced in the interior when the Max-
imalist agitation has not yet reached,
a stage of importance. It is rumored
that he demonstration of May 1 prob-
ably will serve to cover important pol-;
itical changes.

REGISTRARS MEET
AT U. OF CHICAGO
The American Association of Col-
legiate Registrars, of which Registrar
Arthur G. Hall is a member, will hold
on April 24 to 26 its ninth annual
meeting at the University of Chicago.
A program, which will center on
college administrative problems re-
sulting from the war, calls for ad-
dresses by several registrars and by
a representative of the United States
Bureau of Education. Featuring the
meeting will be a' paper from abroad
sent by Prof. John Erskine, head of
the. Army Educational commission,
Paris, on the "A. E. F. University and
Its Work Overseas."
Rgistrar Hall, who will represent the
University, has been asked to submit
a report for a uniform recommenda-
tion blank for high school graduates
intending to enter college. Because
of the war conditions, last year's meet-
ing was cancelled.
TRANSATLANTiC FLIER
FINISHES FINAL TESTS

_ _

WEATHER STILL UNSETTLED
AIRMEN ARE FULLY
PREPARED

BUTT

(By Associated Press)
St. Johns, Newfoundland, April 17.
-While weather conditions were too
unsettledt to permit Harry G. Hawker,
Australian airman, or Cpatain Freder-
ick P. Raynham, his British rival, to
start their transatlantic race for the
$50,000 prize offered by the London
Daily Mail, conditions today over this
section of Newfoundland were favor-
able to allow Raynham to complete his
preparations with a test flight in his
Martinsyde biplane. Hawker already
has made his final trial trip in his
.Sopwith and tonight both machines are
resting intheir hangars with petrol
tanks filled ready to take the air at
the first signs of clearing weather.
Limerick, Ireland, April 17. - Major
J. C. P. Wood expects to start on his
attempt to cross the Atlantic in an
airplane early next week, according to
announcement by his representatives
here today. The machine will take the
air at noon and, reckoning on 24
hours for the flight and the time gain-
ed by flying westward, Wood expects
to reach the Acerican coast in broad
daylight. Weather conditions are still
very uncertain.
Capt. Clark, '14,
Wins 2 Medals
Capt. C. E. Frazer Clark, '14, holder
of both the French and the Belgian
war crosses and participator in the
drives on the Voges, Argonne, St. Mi-
hel, and Flanders fronts, has been vis-
iting in Ann Arbor during the past
few days. . .
At present Captain Clark, who is in
the infantry, is on leave from his sta-
tion in Georgia. He enlisted in De-
cember, 1916, in the American am-
bulance volunteer corps which went to
France to co-operate with the Allied
armies. Upon the entrance of the
United States into the war, he return-
ed to this country and enlisted in the
infantry at Camp Custer.
From there he was sent to Camp
Lee, Va., where he received his lieu-
tenancy. His division went overseas
in September, 1918. During the last
few months of the war he took active
part in the main sectors in France and
Belgium.
Captain Clark has seen the coming
of 'the Yanks, their attacks on the
French and Belgian fronts, and the
close of the war. As far as can be
learned he is the only University grad-
uate who has received both the French
and the Belgian distinguished service
crosses.
When asked what his intentions for.
the future were, Captain Clark stated
that he would remain in the service
for at least the next several months.
DATE OF PRESIDENT WILSON'S
RETURN STILL INDEFINITE
Washington, April 17. - Private ad-
vices to the White House today from,
Paris said plans for the President's
return to the United States still were
indefinite and that reports published
in Paris that April 27 or 2 had been;
fixed as tentative dates for his sail-
ing were without foundation. The
message said satisfactory progress was
continuing in the peace conference.
PRESIDENT UA RY B. HUTCHINS
CANCELS TRIP TO NEW YORK
Owing to University business condi-
tions, President Harry B. Hutchins
was obliged to cancel his trip to Newj
York today where'le had planned toI
attend a meeting of the trute s of the
American Univesity mrou nn Europe.

OFFICERS FOR NEW
YEAR ELECTED B
CAMPUS WOMEN
WOMEN'S LE~ iE, 1Y. . 1. C. A., AND)
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION CHOOSE
NEW LEA)ERS
MARGUERITE CHAPIN '20
WOMEN'S LEAGUE HEAD
Laura Peocoek, '20, Wins Race For
Athletic Association Presidency;
K. Loveland, '20, heads "Y"
Officers for the ensuing year in three
women's organizations were elected
Thursday in University hall. The new
officers of the Women's league will be-
gin their duties immediately. The Y.
W. C. A. will install its new staff on
April 30.
The results of the election for the
Women's league are as follows: pres-
idpnt, Marguerite Chapin, '20; vice-
president, Elsie Erley, '20; recording
secretary, Marguerite Clark, '21; cor-
responding secretary, Isabelle Swan,
'22; treasurer, Marcella Moon, '21;
senior director, Marion Ames, '20; ju-
nior directors, Gladys Reineke, '21,
and Josephine McGinnis, '21; sopho-
more director, Helen Bishop, '22.
In the Women's Athleleassociation
the following members were elected:
president, Laura Peacock, '20; vice-
president, Phyllis Wiley, '21; treasur-
er, Alice Hinkson, '21; secretary,
Eleanor Stephenson, '22; senior rep-
resentative, Kathryn Loveland, '20; ju-
nior representative, Edith Apfel, '21;
sophomore representative, Florence
Freeman, '22.
The officers elected for the Y. W. C,
A. are: president, Katherine Loveland,
'20; vice-president, Lois DeVries, '21;
secretary, Desdemona Watts, '22;
treasurer, Beatrice Beckwith, '21.
SEIEN ALUMNI NAMES
INCRASEHONOR, OLL
Seven more deaths of men in the
service have recently been confirmed
by the alumni catalogue office. Three
of these men died overseas and three
on this side, and one while crossing.
First Lieut. David H. Cohn, '13L, died
in action Nov. 1, 1918, near Spittaals-
Bosschen, Belgium. He was awarded
the distinguished service medal for ex-
traordinary heroism in action.
Pneumonia, after he was severely
gassed and wounded, caused the death
of Pvt. Frank M. Shepard, '14L, Aug.
20, 1918. Disease also caused the
death of Guy Raymond Forbes, ex-'07L,
May 5, 1918, near Toul, France. He
was a first lieutenant attached to the
508th service battalion of engineers.
Liut. Argo M. Foster, 'OM, died in
Chicago, Sept, 2, 1918, just after he
had received lis commission in the
medical reserve corps and before he
could enter service.
Orin M. Peters, '11L, a sergeant in
ordnance, died March 8, 1919, at his
home in Manwatosa, Wis., only a short
time after receiving his discharge
from the service.
from the service. Arthur D. Mott, Jr.,
'14E, died Dec. 17, 1918, at Camp Shel-
by, Miss. He was a sergeant in the
154th engineers and his commission
was received after his death.
Richard John Carter, '14E, a private]
in the 37th engineers, died March 18,
1919 on board the transport Princess
Manika while two days out from New-
port News. He had participated in!
many engagements.
TAU BETA PI INITIATE It
NEW MEN AT ANNUAL BANQUET

Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineering
society, held its annual banquet and
initiation hursday evening.
After the initiation ceremonies in the
engineering building, at which G. R.
Anderson, '20E, C. 0. Barton, '20E, G.
E. Campbell, '19E, J. M. Darbaker,
'20E, B. Douglas, '20E, C. R. Ford,
'20E, M. F. Gardner, '20E, J. E. Good-
willie, '20E, C. T. Hogan, '20, C. W.
Huff, '20E, and F..H. Taylor, '20E, were
taken in as members of the organiza-
tion, a banquet was held at the Delta
cafe. Colonel W. C. Hoad made a
short speech and congratulated the
new members upon their entrance in-;
to the society.1
TWENTY ALLIED MEN KILLED
IN TRAIN WRECK NEAR PARIS
Paris, April 17. - Fourteen Ameri-
can and six French soldiers were kill-
ed today near Le Mans when an ex-
press train carrying American troops
crashed into a stationary train with
French soldiers on furlough. Twenty-I
five Americans and 22 Frenchmen were
injured. Le Mans is in the defart-
ment of Saithe, west of Paris. f

LOCAL RED CROSS
PLANS ACTIVITIES
Plans for after the war work of the
local chapter of the Red Cross were
discussed at a meeting of the members
here Wednesday night. Miss Minnie
Ahrens, who heads the Red Cross or-
ganization for this district, compris-
ing seven states, was the principal
speaker.
Miss Ahrens believes that the public
nursing and the hygienic educational
campaign which is about to be started
is a greater one than that which the
war thrust upon them.
The nurses who will have charge
of the work will have been trained at
the University. None are entered in
the University course unless they have
already received a trained nurse's cer-
tificate.
The efficiency required of the nurs-
es for the work may be realized from
Miss Ahrens statement that out of
90,000 nurses in this country but 6,000
are available to the needs of this
branch of work.
Miss Ahrens praised the work of the
local members in the war work and
said that this district, during the flu
epidemic made a record to be proud
of. She said that 1,000 nurses were
placed in cantonments in three weeks.
BELGIU.M, AS[S DAMGS
OF -35 BILLION FRNCS,
INDEMNITY DEMANDS BASED ON
PREVAILING PRICES OF
MATERIALS
(By Associated Press)
Brussels, April 17. - Belgium's
war damages for which it is contended
an indemnity should be collected from
Germany were placed at 35,000,000,-
000 francs in a report made today by:
the central industrial commission,
which has completed an investigation!
of the subject. The commission has
reckoned the cost of materials on the
basis of prices now prevailing, de-
claring this is only just that Belgium
be restored to the condition in which
it was at the beginning of August,
1914.
In itemizing the damages the claim
for state property is placed at 5,525,-'
000,000 francs, of which 4,515,000,000
francs is on account of railroads,
posts, and telegraphs. The damage to
Belgium's industry is placed at slightly'
more than 8,000,000,000 francs.
SOPH ENGINEERS
ATTEND MEETING
Sophomore engineers decided to hold
the "Soph Prom' 'May 2 at the Armory
at their meeting on Thursday.
The dance will be informal and 150
tickets will be given out. An eight
piece orchestra will furnish the music.
Clarence Johnson stated at this
meeting that -the Student Council will
not sanction either the push-ball or
pole rush contest at the spring games
this year. A motion was made and
passed unanimously that a strong re-
quest be presented to the Council to
reconsider its action in regard to this
matter.
The following men were nominated
by the class for the honor committee,
two of which will be elected at the
spring election C. G. Wetzel, LeGrand
A. Gaines, Pierce McLouth, and John
Pilkington.
NOVEL BULLETIN BOARDS TO
BE FEATURE OF NEiW LIBRARY
Large bulletin boards in the main
hallway will be one of the features
of the new Library.
These are set in the wall about a
foot and are cover'4 with large glass

doors that may be locked. There are
in all nine such boards which are six
feet high. Seven of them are seven
feet wide and two are one-third that
width.
Besides bulletins these boards can
exhibit books and other large objects
of interest without leaving them ex-
posed to the dangers of handling.
Law Pleading Exams Come Saturday
Examinations in comomn law plead-
ing will be held from 9 to 12 o'clock
Saturday morning in the Law school.
These examinations are usually held
at the end of the year at the 'same
time as the junior examinations. The
irregulariity in academic work of the
Law school caused by the S. A. T. C.
throws them forward to this date.
Many Enlist at Camp fuster
Battle Creek, Mich., April 17.-Re-
cruiting officers at Camp Custer report
a considerable increase of late, in en-
listments under the call for 50,000 men
for overseas service. A numier of
civilians are enlisting and many dis-
charged soldiers have lately re-enlist-
ed, it is stated.

1 ard Crane, private secretary to
SSecretary Lansing and son of
CharlesR. Crane, ofChicago, is
understood to have been selected
to become the first American I
minister to the new republic of 1
Czecho-Slovakia. Announcement
of his appointment is expected
from Paris shortly.
MARIONETTES WIN
GENUINE SUCCESS
Costumes and Scenery Appreciated By
Capacity Attendance At Both
Performances

WAR
TO

CORRESPONDENT
BOOST BOND ISSUE

EASE WITH
PUPPETS

MONSTER
IN HILL
WEEK'

IMASS M*EETING 'TONIGHT
AUDITORIUM, HHRLDS 'NEXT
'S VICTORY LIBERTY LOA9N DRIV
- VARSITY BAND, SINGING, AND
NISTER NAEIui ORGAN PLAYING ARRANGED
-- FOR PRELIMINARY
April 17.-Rich-

NEW U. S. Ml
Washington,

WHICH TONY SARGf'S
ACT SURPRISES . ALL

(By Paul A. Shinkman)
Michigan's campus was given a
taste of one of the most historic and
at the same time most modern forms
of entertaincent yesterday when Tony
Sarg presented his Marionettes in a
matinee and evening performance in
the Natural Science auditorium.
The program included "A Night in
Delhi,' 'or "The Snake Charmer," and
Thackeray's "The Rose and the Ring,"
.and to say that the capacity audiences
were pleased is conservatism, to a
fault - they were completely charm-
ed by the fascinating quaintness of the
whole thing.
To see the little string-controlled
figures moting easily about the stage
and apparently conversing with the
greatest gusto is genuine entertain-
ment not soon to be forgotten. There
seemed to be no limitations to the ef-
fects which can be produced, and the
writhing snake in the. curtain-raiser,
"A Night In Delhi" caused a percepti-
ble shiver throughout the auditorium.
Actions eRalstic
"The Rose and the Ring," however,
furnishes the real surprises of the
evening. In this piece, the puppets
dance about the stage, ride horse-back,
play the piano, and sing with the
greatest nonchalance. The play fol-
lows Thackeray's text closely, even'to
the appearances of the characters,
which were reproduced from the au-
thor's. own sketches illustrating his
story. The mysterious appearances
and disappearances of the Fairy
Blackstick were especially effective as
was the conversion of the wicked
Gruffanuff into a brass knocker.
Not a small part of the production
are the costumes and. settings. The
former are gorgeous and faithful to
Thackeray. Thscenes, of which there
'are eight, are veritable little classics
in their composition, and many of
them resemble the famous Maxfield
Parrish pictures. Others are dis-
tinctly "Urbanesque." Instrumental
music off-stage, composed by Winthrop
Parker, lends a mysteriously beautiful
effect to the romantic scenes, as does
the singing of Jeanette Van der Vel-
pen Reaume.
Not a Tangle
Although the audience was warned
to be ready for a possible tangle in the
400 strings, this was unnecessary as
the performance went off without a
hitch, and it was impossible not to
forget that the actors were mere pup-
pets instead of animate beings.
It is small wonder that Mr. Sarg,
who created the Marionettes, has been
greeted by packed houses wherever he
has played. Great credit is due the
Association of Collegiate Alumnae for
bringing him to Ann Arbor. The pro-
duction represents a distinctly unique
entertainment which deserves, and is
granted, a place of regard in the
modern theater.
LAST WOMEN'S LEAGUE MIXER
IN BARBOUR GYM SATURDAY
An all-campus mixer will be given
by the Women's league from 2 to 5'
o'clock Saturday afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium. This is the last mix-
er the league will give this year.
'the board of directors of the league
will ate as a committee on introduc-
tions. Ella Rasmussen, '19, is general
chairman of the mixer.
Ice cream cones will be sold by the
Senior society. Ike Fisher's three
piece orchestra will furnish music for
dancing. Tickets for the mixer will
be sold at the door of Barbour gym-
nasium.

Importance of Last Bond Issue to Be
Emphasized by Speakers of
National Prominenee
"BUY VICTORY BONDS"
This will be brought out again and
again at 8 o'clock tonight at Hill audi-
torium. In a big mass meeting prom-
inent speakers, both local and from
out of town, will bring home this
point.
The Varsity band will play for it,
speakers will talk for it, and many
will sing for it.
Thousands are expected to attend
this meeting. Before the opening it is
probable that the Varsity band will
play down town, and before the audi-
torium to bring the people together.
Painted in big letters on a down town
bill board is "Hit the Trail to Hill
Auditorium," and to bring out clearly
the meaning, a path with many foot-
prints is shown below.
War Correspondent to Speak
The thousands who tramp to attend
this meeting which will launch the
fifth and last Liberty loan will be re-
paid for their trouble by the speech
of S. J. Duncan Clark of the Chicago
Post. As a war correspondent he has
seen many battles -of the war which
will enable him to convey his message
to the local citizens in a vivid man-
ner.
Women will be attracted by a wom-
an of national importance, Mrs. James
Morrison, of Chicago, a member of the
Council of National Defense, and pres-
ident of the Chicago Suffrage league,
She has become a prominent figure be-
cause of her tireless energy, her unus-
ual personality, and her brilliance of
speech.
H. W. Douglas to Preside
Henry W. Douglas, president of the
Washtenaw county Red Cross, will
preside, and give a short talk. Roscoe
0. Bonisteel, a local attorney and
booster of a worthy enterprise, will
explain briefly the plans. for a cam-
paign in this city. Senator George W.
Millen will assist in presiding and
talk on the county campaign.
Earl Morgan will play the-organ,
and Carl Lindegree, head of the music
department at Ypsilanti Normal, will
sing. It is probable that a general
sing will be held. The meeting will
undoubtedly last no longer than an
hour and a half.
This meeting is preliminary .to the
actual Victory . Liberty loan drive
which will start Monday. It is planned
to take all volunteer subscriptions at
;.The Victory Temple" next to the
First National bank on Main street'
during the first three days of next
week. If the quota is not raised in
this time, other methods will be used,
Michigan Union Meeting
Twenty or thirty of the salesmen
will meet in the Michigan Union for
supper Friday evening to discuss plans
for the campaign. At this time it
will be decided whether special ef-
forts will be made in the University
for the selling of bonds to the stu-
dents.
If it is decided to make aneffort
among the students, it is probable that
a booth will be provided on the cam-
pus at which subscriptions will be
taken from only the students in the
same maner as from the townspeople.
Mr. Bonisteel, who has charge of
this drive, said, "It is the duty of
everyone to decide how many bonds
they will take, and to take them dur-
ing the three volunteer days. Each
one should buy to the limit to avoid
underscription to this last drive.
DELEGATES DISCUSS
FRATERNITY RULES
Representatives of practically every
fraternity in the University met Wed-
nesday evening in the Union to formu-
late plans for the revision of the In-
ter-fraternity League. Comm.ttees
were appointed to investigate the sys-

tems of rushing and pledging in use
at other universities.
Another meeting of the league will
be held next Wednesday, evening,
April 23, in the Union, at which, it is
probable, a change ivill be made in the
inter-fraternity regulations regarding
pledging. It is the plan of the league
to inaugurate a definiteset of rules in
regard to this matter.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan