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April 17, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-17

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; POSSIBLY
SNOW

LY

S.ir

:43 a tt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DA Y AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 135. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

NO DAN GER OF U. S.
IMBROGLIO WITH
JAPANSYS POLK
ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE DE-
NIES EXISTENCE OF SERIOUS
QUESTIONS
KOREAN AND SIBERIAN
CRISES MINOR ISSUES
Crowell Makes Statement Contradiet-
ing Reports; Yank Troops
Vindicated
Washington, April 16.-Acting Sec-
retary of State Polk, today authorized
the statement that no serious ques-
tions were pending between the Unit-
ed States and Japan. He said that the
indications were that minor issues
arising from the situation in Siberia
and the recent trouble at Tien Tsin, as
well as peace conference problems
soon would be amicably settled with-
out any straining of the relations be-
tween the two countries.
Mr. Polk said there had been recent-
ly many sensational reports that were
unjustified.
Crowell Denies Report
This statement followed closely one
by Acting Secretary Crowell of the
war department specifically denying a
published report that Maj.-Gen. W. S.
Graves, commanding the United States
forces in Siberia, had reported the
failure of American troops to aid the
Japanese in a recent engagement as
due to the fact that the Japanese had
shot down women and children.
No Americans Engaged
It was disclosed that the engage-
ment in question, which has been the
subject of various dispatches from
Vladivostok and Tokio, was fought at
Habarovsk on Feb. 25, by a Japanese
unit against revolters against General
Horvath, one of the Siberian military
commanders with whom the Allies
have co-operated, and that no Amer-
ican troops were in theWicinity-Mt the
time. The Japanese force literally was
wiped out.
Some unofficial dispatches from the
East have created the impression that
Americans stood by, refusing to go to
the aid of their out numbered Allies.
ALL SENIOR DANCE
PLANNED BY LITS
A senior Swing-out dance to be held
at 2:30 o'clock Saturday, May 3, in
Barbour gymnasium, is being planned
by the social committee of the se-
nior lit class.
All senior classes are to be ipvited
to this affair which is the first of its
kind ever given on the campus. The
proposed price of admission is 25
cents and all those attending will be
expected to wear thei4 caps and,
gowns.
It is thought by those in charge that
the Swing-out and the dance within
two weeks after will encourage all
the seniors to wear their caps and
gowns on the prescribed Wednesdays
and Fridays and will also help unite
the senior classes before the round of
commencement activities starts.
Seniors are requested not to come
in couples, that is, the men are not
to bring the women. A much better
turnout is expected if this method is
followed.
COMEDY CLUB PLANS FOR
MAY PERFORMANCE OF PLAY
With the resumption of the semester
routine, members of the Comedy club

have taken up active work on the
comedy "Green Stockings,' 'the play by
A. E. W. Mason, which will be pre-
sented during the early part of May.
Tuesday night marked the opening
of rehearsals, which will continue al-
most daily until the date of perform-
ance. The play is being directed this1
year by Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the
oratorical department.

W O M EN OFFICERS
ELECTED THURSDAY
Elections for offices in the Women's
league, Women's Athletic association
and Y. W. C. A. will be held from 8
to 5 o'clock Thursday in University
hall.
In the list of nominees appearing in
The Daily for April 16, the name of
Josephine McGinnis, '21, candidate for
junior representative of the Women's
league, was omitted. For this office
there are four candidates, two of
whom will be elected. The other nom-
inees are Esther Paffenbach, '21, Jose-
phine Waldo, '21, and Gladys Reineke,
'21.
LIGHTER DRAMA IN
DEMAND DURING WAR
"REACTION MUST COME SOON,"
SAYS GALSWORTHY IN
INTERVIEW
(By Herbert R. Slusser)
"One cannot fairly judge the drama
during the past three or four years,"
said Mr. John Galsworthy in an in-
terview, Wednesday night. "The large
number of soldiers and moving troops
that have filled our cities have created
a temporary demand for the type of
stage production which would amuse;
which would entertain with sight and
sound. The theater owners have seen
what their crowds wanted and have
filled their theaters with that type of
production. This condition will prob-
ably go on for a year or more,
but I think it' is quite certain that
there will be a reaction before very
long.
"Among the dramas which merit
study by those who aspire to do se-
rious work later on are those of
Chekov, Granville Barker, and Mase-
field. The student cannot do better
than acquaint himself thoroughly with
the writings of the masters, de Ma-
passant, Turgeniev, Anatole France,
and in the English, of W. C. Hud-
son."
When asked how he liked Chicago,
from whch he-has just returned, Mr.
Galsworthy smiled. "Chicago is so
big I cannot claim to undertsand it.
It is big, and rugged, and smoky. I
wish something could be done to make
it smokeless. Chicago was a little
frightening, almost portentous."
Mr. and Mrs. Galsworthy arrived at
5 o'clock, and at 6 were entertained
at dinner in the Union building by
Prof. and Mrs. T. C. Trueblood.
Other guests were Prof. and Mrs.'
R. M. Wenley, Prof. and Mrs.
L. A. Strauss, and Prof. and Mrs. F.
N. Scott.
Found--Place For
Your Old Clothesl
Those in charge of the collection of
clothing for the European relief say
that much more clothing is needed.
No estimate has been made as to the
amount already donated but it is be-
lieved that a city the size of Ann Ar-
bor should give more than has been
so far collected.
Any kind of clothing or cloth with
which garments can be made is gladly
accepted at the Williams street Red
Cross office. Torn clothing is also
welcome as the people to whom the
articles are sent are willing to do any
amount of patching as several of th
war sufferers are badly in need of the
clothes.
Articles must be received before Sat-
urday and if possible it is asked that
the donations be brought to the of-
fice.
COMMERCE CLUB PLANS.

ALL-ECONOMICS SMOKER
"Business Correspondence and
Form" was the subject of a talk given
by Mr. Moriarty before the Commerce
club at their meeting Wednesday'
evening in room 103 Economics build-
ing. The speech was very interesting
and highly cnjoyed by the members
of the organization.
After the talk plans were made for
an all-economics smoker to be held at
the Union, Wednesday, April 30. Mem-
bers of the dAonomics faculty will
speak on subjects of interest to the
students in the business administra-
tion department.
It is expected that a trip of the
club to Detroit will be made in the
near future to visit several industrial
plants.
C. A. Towler will be in room 102
Economics building from 2 to 3 April
17 and 18 to meet all members of the
club who are interested in the posi-
tions which the employment commit-
tee has in view.

HUGE MEETING TO
STARTVICTORY LOAN
MONEY MUST BE RAISED TO STA-
BILIZE FINANCIAL
CONDITIONS
Efforts to raise the Victory Liberty
loan, the fifth and last loan which the
government will ask of the people, will
be launched in Ann Arbor Friday night
with a huge mass meeting in Hill aud-
itorium.
At this meeting prominent speakers,
both men and women, will talk. Fore-
most among these is S. J. Duncan
Clark of the Chicago Evening Post,
who has acquired a reputation as al
public speaker in the last few years.
He is described as a pleasing, enter-
aining, and enthusiastic lecturer. The
others will be local men and women.
Quota Is $1,111,62$.28
Ann Arbor's quota is $1,111,629.28,
anl as yet no definite part of this lYas
been assigned as the University quota.
(Continued on Page Six)

OCPAONOF RHINE
TO CONTINUE 15 EARS
GERMANS NAME SPECIAL COMMIT-
TEE ON PEACE NEGOTIA-
TIONS
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 16.-The council of four
has decided that military occupation
of the left bank of the Rhine shall
continue for 15 years. Inter-Allied
forces will be used but they will be
withdrawn progressively in proportion
as Germany meets her financial obli-
gations, and be replaced by French
and Belgian soldiers.
Berlin, April 16.-A special commit-
tee on peace negotiations named by
the German national assembly at Wei-
mar, will include President Fehren-
bach and the three vice-presidents of
the assembly. The other members will
be 28 delegates to the assembly, rep-
resenting all parties and including
two women socialists.

UNITED STATES CANNOT STAY ALONE
ONCE. LEAGUE Of NATIONS IS FORMED

f

MUST BOIL WATER

City water should be boiled
before its use for drinking pur-
poses.,
Analysis of the Ann Arbor city
water shows that it contains
Colon germs, according to Dr.
J. A. Wessinger, city health of-
ficer. As to the length of time
the water should be boiled Dr.
Wessinger stated that it was
only necessary to bring the wat-
er to the bailing point.
C During normal times the wat- .
er department is able to keep
the water in proper condition by
the chlorine treatment but on
occasions of flood conditions as
we have had in the past few days
boiling is necessary to make the
water absolutely safe.
UNIVERSITY RADIO
TO START AGAIN
Word was obtained form the dis-
trict radio inspector Wednesday morn-
ing that the receiving part of the radio
station could be opened. This ruling
will also apply to all amateur and ex-
perimental stations, throughout the
country.
Work will start immediately to
raise the aerial on the short poles
which are approximately 60 feet in
height. The instruments will be in
room 103 of the Engineering building
under the supervision of P. H. Evans
of the electrical engineering depart-
ment.
All amateurs who are interested in
radio work are welcome in this room.
Here experiments for the bettering of
wireless telegraphy will be carried on
by members of the engineering fac-
ulty.-
As yet the transmission of messages
is not permitted, and will not be un-
til the peace treaty is signed. At that
time it is expected that an aerial will
be erected from the chimney of the
engineering building to a post which
will be on the building, thus making
the aerials of equal height. The high
aerials are necessary only to send
messages ,and receiving is not ham-
pered by low aerials.
The Michigan wireless station was
closed down April 10, 1917, by pres-
idential proclamation because of war
conditions which made it necessary to
have only government wireless sta-
tions operated. At that time the
greatest distance from which a mess-
age had been received and sent by
the local station was Colon, Panama,
and that was under favorable condi-
tions. The apparatus has been so per-
fected since then that a message from
Colon could probably be heard now
under .any weather conditions.
At the present time communications
may be held with many high power
stations on this continent, and a re-
ceiver is now being designed which
will make possible communication
with European stations.
Pres. Hutchins to Go to Union Meeting
President Harry B. Hutchins will
leave today for New York City, where;
he will attend a meeting of the trustees
of the American University Union in
Europe. President Hutchins, who is
one of the trustees, tsated that no spe-1
cial work had been planned, thoughI
an outline for the future will no doubt
be made. He will return to Ann Arbor
Monday morning.

BRITAIN AND AMERICA MUST
CO-OPERATE, BRITISHER
DECLARES
BOTH NATIONS MUST
SERVE ALL CREATION
Truth Must Be Universal to Make
Future Democracy All We
Hope For
"Let us have faith in the League of
Nations, an'd if it is initiated at all
let us initiate it whole-heartedly. If
America does not come into the league
now she will have to come in later."
With this challenge, Mr. John Gals-
worthy, the eminent British writer, in
his lecture last night in Hill audi-
torium, summed up the main new fac-
tors that have come into the civil-
ized world with the world war.
"Do not be ashamed of the league
as an impractical piece of idealism.
True, not' until the tribunal of the
League of Nations has succeeded in
conciliation will many of us open our
cynical eyes. When its success is a
fact we will begin to believe it. But
we shall never know until we try it,
so let us give the league, a hearty
send -off.
Hopes for Anglo Union
",The horror of the war will soon
wear off and will cease to control our
actions. Then one of the greatest fac-
tors in the success of the league, and
one of the most significant elements
in world affairs, will be the co-opera-
tion of Britain and America. Anglo-
American union will go far toward
guaranteeing justice and humaneness
among nations. America and Britain
must bring their children up not with
the idea that together we can whip
all creation, but that together we can
serve all creation."
Regarding the danger of Bolshevism,
Mr. Galsworthy said, "It is quite clear
that the social unrest in Europe is,
like all revolutionary movements of
the past, an outcome of suffering.
Canada, the United States, and Aus-
tralia are not under the same danger
from the Bolshevist movement that
Europe is. It is my hope that civil
war may be averted and that the in-'
justice of growing, disproportionate
wealth will be overcome without com-
plete upheaval."
Heroism Hampers Men
Speaking specifically of the effect of
the war upon the individuals of the
millions who have served in Europe
through the awful carnage of war,
Mr. Galsworthy continues, "A kind of
unreality hangs about the ex-sol-
dier. Most men look forward in their
lives to the time when they shall meet
the great test; when they shall have;
proved themselves more nearly men
(Continued on Page Six)
NEW ENGLAND CLUB DISCUSSES
PUBLICITY FOR UNIVERSITY#
Following the lead of some of the,
sectional clubs already organized, the
New England club, at their meetinga
Wednesday night in Lane hall, adopt-
ed, for the feature of their constitu-
tion, the advertising of Michigan in
their home communities.
The formation of a New England
Alumni, to work in co-operation with
the club was also discussed. It will
be partly through this agency that!
the publicity campaign will be car-I
ried on. It is also planned to send let-
ters and copies of The Daily to the
local high schools of which the mem-
bers of the club are graduates. Mem-I
bers of the club will answer all cor-
respondence from prospective Mich-I
igan students, and, on their arrival,t
will aid them in getting located. I

TONY SARG TO SHOW
MARIONETTES TODAY
Punch and Judy a la mode will make
their appearance in Ann Arbor at 4
o'clock this afternoon and 8 o'clock
tonight in the Natural Science audi-
torium.
Tony Sarg-he who awoke Jaded
Greenwich village-is responsible for
their appearance and he calls them
his Marionettes. The little actors will
present Thackeray's "The Rose and
the Ring," "A Night in Delhi," or "The
Snake Charmer," and "The Music
Lesson."
Mr. Sarg's marionettes, sophisticat-
ed creatures though they are, are nev-
ertheless lineal descendants of Punch
and Judy, of the puppets in the old
mysteries, and of the still older pup-
pet-players whose origin lies back of
all history. They are said to be the
oldest form of entertainment and are
today in competition with the stage
and screen.
TheM arionettes have progressed
far beyond their ancestors mechani-
cally and artistically, and where the
old puppets were controlled by four or
five wires, the twentieth century ones
have as many as 24 wires to a single
figure and canareproduce action that
was formerly impossible, even to ex-
hibiting facial expression.
Scenery and costumes are an im-
portant part of the production and
represent considerable work. Six peo-
.pleare required to operate the fig-
ures. The Marionettes come to Ann
Arbor from the Arts and Crafts thea-
ter, Detroit, and will appear here un-
der the auspices of the Association of
Collegiate Alumnae. Tickets are on
sale at Wahr's book store.
Vand To Put Pep
In Saginaw Loan
As many men will be taken with the
Varsity band on the trip to Saginaw
as there are uniforms. This means
that about 55 men will go for that
many uniforms have been distibuted
to the band.
Via Detroit the band will depart at
7 o'clock Saturday morning and upon
its arrival will parade from the sta-
tion to the Bancroft house. With new
music it will play at the three mass
meetings and in one parade. "Var-
sity," "Victors" and other old Michi-
gan songs will also be played for the
benefit 1of the Saginaw alumni, of
whom there are a great number.
These meetings will launch the Vic-
tory Loan in Saginaw. The parade
will be one of the largest held in that
city. Approximately 5,000 people are
expected to attend the meeting, which
will be held Sunday afternoon in the
Auditorium. ,
The band will return to Ann Arbor
Sunday night, and it is possible that
it will play at Monroe, which means
that the band will not arrive in Ann
Arbor until Tuesday.
A business meeting and a rehearsal
was held Wednesday evening at the
University School of Music. This is
all that will be held this week, for the
band is in excellent condition because
of the recent trip to Chicago.
NEW AIR SERVICE
TO BE RECRUITED
One of the most novel recruiting
campaigns ever started in this coun-
try for the military service is being
begun by the air service in an ef-
fort to elist 15,000 men for that
branch of the army.
Every flying field in the country
will send its planes to the cities in
its vicinity to give exhibitions ad to
further acquaint the people with the
flying game.
The government points out that by
the time a young man's enlistment is
finished, aviation will be on a com-
mercial basis and with the govern-

ment training along these lines his
services will be in great demand.
After the enlistment is served there is
no further obligation.
The air service is in need of pi-
lots, mechanics, electricians, foundry
men and, others with trades to work
on the planes and equipment. The
service is also desirous of having
young men who have no training, but
are mechanically inclined and are in-
terested in aviation. Schools will be
started shortly for the training of
these men.
On enlisting a man without training
becomes a private at $30 a month and
for anyone who applies himself the
advancement is rapid. The highest
pay for a non-commissioned man is
$121 a month for a master signal elec-
trician, aviation mechanician.
Any, man enlisting who has a high.
school education may try for a com-
mission. Men enlisting who have a.
trade will be rated and paid accord-
ing to their value to the service. It.
has been figured out that a good me-:
chanic can save more money in thisi
branch of the service than in civil life.

INTERVENTION IN
RUSSIA IMPROPER..
DECLARESPREMIER
LLOYD GEORGE ADVISES NON-
RECOGNITION OF BOL.
SHEVISM
SAYS HUNGER IS REAL
DANGER IN GERMANY
Pleads for No "Hate Feast;" Allies
Completely Agreed on Great
Questions
BULLETIN
Paris, ApriL 16. -- An agreemnt,
was reached today by the associated
powers to send food to Russia under
neutral control, but the French repre-
sentatives made several reservations
which will be considered tomorrow. It
seems likely, however, that the objee-
tions will be overcome and that the
relief work will be pressed rapidly.
The agreements stipulated that the
oilhieviki must cease hostilities.
(By Associated Press)
London, April 16. -- No intervention
in Russia, no recognition of bolshe-
vism, and the fulfillment of his elec-
tion promises including those relat-
ing to indemnities from the enemy
powers, and punishment of the former
German emperor were the outstand-
ing features in the report which Pre-
mier Lloyd George brought from Par-
is and delivered to the House of Com-
mons today.
The laborites vigorously applauded
the premier's announcement of non-
intervention in Russia and non-recog-
nition of bolshevism, but they remain-
ed silent while the conservatives
cheered the statement that the Allies
would continue to aid friendly ele-
ments which are fighting bolshevism.
Allies Completely Agreed
The Allied representatives at Paris
have arrived at a complete understand-
ing on the great fundamental ques-
tions that would effect peace with
Germany, the premier declared. The
Allies have formulated the demands,
and he hoped that by the end of next
week they will be presented.
. Reduction of Armaments
Referring to the necessity of return-
ing to the paths of peace and of re-
ducing the armaments, the premier
said the forces of the country which
had kept Europe in arms for 40 years
were to be reduced to an army which
would be only adequate to police her
cities and protect her commerce. There
were suggestions that there might be
a war recrudescence in Germany. That
was not a danger, Mr. Lloyd George
asserted, because only with difficulty
could Germany raise 80,000 men to
preserve order. The danger he said
was of the world going to pieces, add-
ing:
Danger in Hunger
"A real danger - the gaunt spectre
of hunger - is stalking through the
land."
Premier Lloyd George concluded by
peading to all "not to soil this triumph
by indulging in the angry passions of
mankind but to consecrate the sacri-
fices of millions to the redemption of
the human race from the scourge and
agony of war."
THREE WOMEN'S RESIDENCES
OPEN IN SUMMER SESSION

Adequate housing accommodations'
during the summer session are avail-
able for about 110 women. This num-
ber may secure board and room under
competent direction, according to Dean
E. H. Kraus of the summer session.
Throughout the summer of 1919
three residence halls will be open for
women, the Helen M. Newberry resi-
dence, Kent hall, and Alumnae house.
A special bulletin giving detailed in-
formation about the three residences
will appear the latter part of the
week.
Students who desire to live in the
Helen M. Newberry residence should
correspond with Miss Lucy E. Elliott,
its social head. Those desiring to live
in the other buildings should com-
municate directly with Dean Myra B.
Jordan.
Undergraduate women of the regu-
lar session who expect to attend the
summer session are required to room
in houses approved by the dean of
women.

CALIFORNIA PROFESSOR DIES
San Francisco, April 16.-Prof.
Henry Morse Stephens of the
University of California, promin-.
ent educator and author, drop-
ped dead here today. Professor
Stephens was active in war work
and was called to Washington
in connection with it. He was
born in Edinburgh, Scotland,
Oct. 3, 1857. Professor Stephens
was the author of several his-
tories and was a contributor to
Encyclopedia Britannica.

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