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April 16, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_,
t

Y BILLS INCREASE
PROFESSORS' SALARIES

OTHER C OLLEGES BEGIN
REALIZE FACULTY
NEEDS

TOI

(By Thomas F. McAllister)
With the passage of the Univer-
sity appropriation bill by the Senate
of the Michigan legislature yesterday,
action upon the emasure is now up
for final consideration before Govern-
or Albert E. Sleeper.
Increased Pay Noteworthy
Much interest has been manifested
in the success of the bill, and in Ann
Arbor especial interest and attention
has been directed toward the clause
providing for an increase in the
scale of professors' salaries. For the
past several months the matter has
engaged the attention of state legis-
latures and educational associations
throughout the country, invariably re-
sulting in action being taken for high-
er salaries for the faculty men.
Readjustments Seen Elsewhere
Important measures are now be-
fore the universities o Nebraska,
Iowa, California, Princeton and Cor-
nell, te readjust the collegiate finan-
cial affairs since the war. A short
time ago the Wisconsin legislature
passed a biennial appropriation of
$5,900,000, closely followed by the
large university budget passed by the
Minnesota assembly, providing among
other measures for a 10 year building
fund of $560,000 a year and an in-
crease in the scale of professors' sal-
aries.
Members of the corporation of Yale
university recently established a
gaduate increase in scale of pay for
fac lty professors and instructors,
Salaries are raised according to length
of service and reappointments."
In the United States Naval academy
at Annapolis teachers holding the rank
of instructor have been advanced to a
minimum of $2,000 a year, while the
minimum of assistant professors is
raised to $2,500. This is in conson-
ance with the policy of the govern-
ment, taking into consideration the
rise in the cost of living during the
war.
Postmaster Advocates Raise
Postmaster General Burleson has
announced that he will advocate a
raise in the wages of all government
telegraph and telephone employes, and
the Federal Rairoad commission a
short time ago increased the wages of
all railroad employes so that at pres-
ent the minimum o the average train-
man is about $2,000.
Faculty Petition, Low Figure
In making their announcement the
railroad commission stated that since
1910 living conditions have become
vastly more expensive, and that in
the past nine years the ordinary cost
of living has increased 117 per cent.
In, this regard it will be remarked
that in the petition to the legislature
by faculty members, the statement
that such an increase amounted to
110 per cent was a modest figure
rather than an exaggeration.
GALSWORTHY, BRITISH AUTHOR,
TO SPEAK HERE THURSDAY
(Continued from Page One)
ty, not only in his writings but in his
deeds. Since the last years of the
war, Mr. Galsworthy has given himself
and his attention exclusively to the
great work of re-education of maimed
soldiers. All who are so fortunate as
to hear this literary celebrity and suc-
cessful worker for humanity will be
doing honor unto themselves."
Professor Brummn
Professor John R. Brumm, of the
rhetoric depar'tment, makes the fol-
lowing statement: "Galsworthy is pre-
eminently a humanist. He is concern-
ed with the epical realities, with prac-
tical moral issues. He employs the
drama and the novel as a public forum
for the criticism of social institutions.
Yet he is no less an artist for the

teaching power which pervades his
writings. The reader of Galsworthy
must possess more than imaginative
interest; he must also have a sympa-
thetic intellectual interest, an interest'
not in events chiefly, but an apprecia-
tion of personality and the issues of
fortune as character and choice de-
termine it. Mr. Galsworthy's visit to
Ann Arbor will be a notable occa-
sion, an inspiration and a rev lation
to all who hear him speak."
Professor Strauss
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, of the Eng-
lish department, says: "John Gals-
worthy is the most representative{
prose writer of the present day. It is
an exceptional opportunity to be ablet
to attend his lecture."1
Rapid Cleaners and Dyers. Ladies
and Gents suits cleaned, $1 per suit.
Work delivered. Call 199-J. 601 E.f
Work delivered. Call 1995-J. 601 E.
Liberty.-Adv.
Advertise in The Daily.-Adv.r

PHOTOGRAPHS OF COLORED
STUDENTS TO BE PUBLISHED
University Negro Stdents Aske to
Send Pictures t Half-Century
Magazine
Pictures of all the colored men and
women graduating from the different
colleges and universities of the coun-
try will be run in the June issue of the
Half-Century magazine.
Dean John R. Effinger is in receipt
of a letter asking that the colored men
and women of this University be not-
ified of the request. The magazine de-
sires a picture of each candidate for
a degree, the degree the candidate ex-
pects to receive, the name of the
school, and any signal honors the can-
didate has received while an under-
graduate.
The pictures must be sent in not
later than April 21. Students con-
cerned are requested to call at Dean
Effinger's office as soon as possible.
BUTTES MONT., PLANNING
A 11MN ASOCITIO N
Butte, Mont., April 16. - Prelim-
inary organization of a new alumni
association by the Michigan men liv-
ing in Butte, Montana, and other cit-
ies of the state was made recently
in that city. The plans are expected
to be perfected at a luncheon April 29.
Mr .Wilfred B. Shaw received news
some time ago that plans for the for-
mation of such a body was being con-
templated. A copy of the usual by-'
laws and constitution was forwarded.
Dr. John A. Donovan, '94M, is tempor-
ary ;chairman and Daniel Malloy is
secretary. The committee on organi-
zation was made up of H. Elliott
Stuckel, Angus McLood,, ex-'09E, Carl
Christian, '06L, Dr. H. A. Tash, '12M,
and Dr. Ray Collins.
It is expected that some member of
the, official body or faculty of the
University will go to Butte early in
the summer to attend a meeting of the,
newly organized branch of the alumni
association.
if/and To Help Put
Over Fifth Loan
Once more the Varsity band will
help the Liberty Loan.
This week end in Saginaw the band
will play at three mass meetings and:
in one parade. Leaving Ann Arbor
Saturday morning with between 50 and
60 members, the band will arrive in
Saginaw in time -to flay at a mass
meeting to be held probably in the
Bancroft House.
In the afternoon they will parade
and in the evening they will play
again at a meeting. Sunday afternoon
the biggest rally of the three will be
held in the Saginaw Auditorium, at
which time Ambassador Gerard will
speak. At this meeting Prof. John R.
Brumm of the rhetoric department will
also, speak.
The same program of patriotic and
college music will be played, but new
march music has been secured. As
many. men will be taken as can be
uniformed. All expenses will be paid
during the two day trip, which will
end Sunday night.
This series of meetings, in Saginaw
will launch the Liberty Loan drive in
that city. The band has been asked
to play at least twice in Detroit and
in other cities as well, but as yet no
definite arrangements have been made.
Following a business meeting a
short rehearsal of the band will be

held at 7 o'clock Wednesday evening
Li the University School of Music. All
members of the band are asked to be
present to learn the details for the
trip.I
70) Y. M. C. A. WORKERS
IN WAR GAVE UP LIVES
New York, April 14.-Eleven Young
Men's Christian association overseas
workers were killed in action, three
lied from wounds, and fifty-six from l
disease and other causes, since the be-
ginning of the war, according to an
announcement by the national war
work council of the organization here
onight. The Y. M. C. A. sent abroad
.338 men and 2,891 women, of whom
5,528 men and 2,187 women are now
overseas, it was stated.
t;he $15 Per Month Wage Increase
Washington, April 15. - Wage in-
rxeases averaging about $15 a month
ofr approximately 69,000 employes of
he American Railway Express com-
pany were announced tonight by Di-
ector General Hines. The increases
epresents an average of $25 a month
above the wage scale in effect Janu-
ary 1, 1918.
Use the Daiy to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
norning.-Adv.

UNIERSITY ASSURE
OF NECESSAY MONEY
(Continued from Page One)
University of the needed money. It
is the largest appropriation ever ask-
ed in tfe history of the schobl. In
the past years the farmers have been
somewhat hostile to the school legis-
lation, but this year all such adver-
sity seemed to have disappeared.
A report was read in the legislature
telling how the government is planning
to teach the disabled Michigan sol-
diers. Approximately 4,000, state sol-
diers were incapacitated during the
war, and the government now intends
to prepare these men for any profes-
sion, trade, or industry in which they
choose to engage. It has entered into
contracts with 347 universities to edu-
cate these as well as other state soL-
diers.
While studying, the crippled sol-
diers will have all expenses paid, such
as books and tuition. Besides this he
will receive $60 a month, if qualified
to 'enter a university. Careful su-
pervision will be made of his work and
if it is .satisfactory at the end of the
first year he will be permitted to con-
tinue his course.
Six colleges have already offered
free tuition for these soldiers, it was
announced Tuesday at Camp Devens,
Mass. They are Massachusetts Agri-
cultural colleges, which offers a six
weeks' course in agriculture; Colum-
bia university, Wentworth institute,
Shaw University for Negroes, West
Virginia university, and Gallaudet col-
lege, which is an institute for the deaf.
HARVARD FRESHMAN SECURES
ITALIAN.AND BRITISH MEDALS
Italian exceptional bravery medal.
and the Order of the British Empire
have been awarded to a Harvard fresh-
men, Bayard Wharton.
Wharton swam out in the swift cur-
rent of the Brenta river and rescued
a drowning aviator after two Italian
soldiers had already lost their lives
in an attempt to save the latter. The
Italian medal received was the Silver
Medal for Valor and is very difficult to
obtain.
U-NOTICES
All classes of the engineering college
will meet Wednesday morning in the
assembly rooms.
The sophomores will meet at 8, ju-
niors at 9, seniors at 10 and fresh-
men at 11.

WOMEN'SORGANIATIONS'
SITE OFFICE NOMINEES
Elections for offices in three wom-
en's organizations will take place from
8 to 5 o'clock Thursday, April 17, in
University hall.
Nominations for the Woman's league
are: for president, Marguerite Chapin,
'20, and Sue Verlenden, '20; vice-pres-
ident, Elsie Erley, '20, and Florence
Field, '20; treasurer, Cornelia Clark,
'21. and Marcella Moon, '21; recording
secretary, Marguerite Clark, '21; and
Flora Belle Ellis, '20; corresponding
secretary, Isabelle Swan, '22, and
Gwendolyn Treat, '22; senior repre-
sentative, Marian Ames, '20, and
Gretchen Jones, '20; junior represen-
tative, Esther Paffenbach, '21, Jose-
phine Waldo, '21, and Gladys Reineke,
'21; sophomore representative, Helen
Bishop, '22, and Agnes Holmquist, '22.
Candidates for the Women's Ath-
letic association are: for president,
Laura Peacock, '20, and Ruth Jen-
nings, '20; vice-president, Phyllis Wi-
ley, '21, and Ann Kirkpatrick,. '20;
treasurer, Alice Hinkson, '21, and Ka-
trina Schermerhorn, '21; secretary,
Hazel Storz, '22, and Eleanor Stephen-
son, '22; senior representative, Dorothy
Jones, '20, and Katherine Loveland,
'20; junior representative, Helen
Koch, '21, and Edith Apfel, '21; and
sophomore representative, Florence
Freeman, '22, and Selma Mueller, '22.
Nominees for the Y. W. C. A. are:
for president, Katherine Loveland, '20,
and Kathryn Glass, '20; vice-presi-
dent, Helen Master, '21, and Lois De-
Vries, '21; treasurer, Beatrice Beck-
with, '21, and Alice Comlossy, '21;
and secretary, Desdemona Watts, '22,
and Virginia Mowry, '22.
Always-Daily service-Always

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
4:15 - Mr. J. Petit lectures to the
Cercle Francais at Tappan hall.,
5:00-Meeting of all senior class pres-
idents at the Union.
7:00 Varsity band rehearsal at school
of Music. Every man who has a
uniform must be present to hear
plans for the trip to Saginaw.
7:00-Meeting of the Commerce club
in room 103 Economics building.
8:00--A special meeting of the New
England club at Lane hall. All
New Englanders are invited.

TOMORROW
9:00- Sophomore engineers meetii
room 342 Engineering building. All
classes are excused. Members are
requested to be ready to pay class
dues.
U-NOTICES
The freshman girls' Glee club practice
has been postponed from Wednesday
to 1 o'clock Saturday.
The Michigan Technic will be on sale
today in the corridors of the Engi-
neering and Chemistry buildings.
Get your Daily subscription at once
and get the full benefit of the reduc-
ed price.-$1.00.-Adv.

.-.i

Dont Fail to Visit Our New Lunch Room

11

Try Our Special Sunday

Dinners

Everything the Best
Tuttle's Lunch Room

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

'I

F you want the best pipe
that can be made, you
can get it in a W D C-up
to $6. If you want the best
genuine French Briar that
as little as 75 cents will buy,
you can get it in a W D C.
American made, in all sizes
and styles, and sold at the
best shops.

s
TRADEIIA1RK.

FOR
BICYCLES
OR
REPAIRS
Handy service at
Il L. SWITZER & CO.

No man ever had abetter'
pipe than this one. Care-
fully selected genuine
French Briar, a sterling
ring and vulcanite bit,
hand fitted and finished
by an expert.
WM. DEMUTH & CO., New York
World's argest Pipe Manufacturer

4

310 South State Street

___ ___ _ I

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4

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