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October 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-17

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT I
SERVICE

X. No. 14. 4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THiUSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1918.

PRICE TH

iii CLOSES PUBLIC PLACES:
W6TON BELIEVES CRISIS PASSED;
.RSITY ORDERED TO WEAR MASKS

i --I

President Hutchins Issues

Order

KASER, ON THRONE; ISSUES NO PEAL
NSE EIA TR PASHD
LINES; ALLIES NEAR LILLEANDIU

to University to WearFace lasks

|IGHT MORE DEATHS IN CITY
BRING DRASTIC CLOSING
ORDER
iELEN DOW HALE, '16,
SUCCUMBS TO DISEASE
'itutign In S. A. T, C. Improving,
99 Leave Hospitas; Few
New Cae
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 16.-While Span-
sIi influenza continues to spread
mong the civilian population there
sa marked decrease in the number of
asaes in army camps today, leading
he officials to believe that the peak
f the epidemic has been reached.
ew cases of influenza reported dur-
ag the 24 hours ending at noon to-
ay totaled 5,558 against 6,498 yes-
erday and more than that number a
iv days ago.
With eight deaths resulting from
he influenza epidemic yesterday the
ity and Universty have taken dra-
Lc measures to stamp out the dis-
ape. An order closing all public
ssembling places has been issued
y Dr. Y. A. Wessinger, city health of-
cer, and a regulation ordering all
tudents and faculty members to wear
'ce na4k in classes, on the streets,
a the campus, and in rooming hous-
wqs ent out by president Harry
. Iutehgig. -
F ve S, A. T. C. Men Die
Iqv of the deaths occurred among
lemberg of the P. A. T. 0. They
rVrx Claude R. goore, Marion C. -W
~ni, C4 .Krpp, ,l . r bs, and
farmy lyers. All were attending the
rniversity for the first time except
kyl.nd, . '21 engineer. Their deaths
vere not directly from influenza but
rom pneumonia following the dis-
ase. The townspeople who died as
V result of the epidemic were MiltoF
[ansom, of Huron street, Mrs. E F.
ampbell, of Syble street, and Helen
)ow Hale,k '16, wife of Prof. William
. Hale, of the chemistry department
VIrs. Hale died unexpectedly yester-
ay morning. After a slight attack of
afluenza, pneumonia set in and she
led within ashort time. Her body
vil be taken to Midland, her former
ome, for burial.
40 Cases Reported in 36 Hours
Dr. Wessinger's decision to prohibit
ublic gatherings came yesterday aft-
r 50 new cases of influenza and four
f pneumonia had been reported in
heQ 30 hpurs qndin yesterday noon.
)x. Wesinger called to attention the
act that practically no deaths had oc-
aurred sathis city frmrn ufiuenza it-
elf, but that the mortality among
,pa contatig neumonia has been
-Vis order follows
an rccount of the prevalence of in-
uenza I# our city and for the pur-
bse pf eradicating the disease as
pedily as pssible, all places of pub-
I0 assembly, Including churches, a-
(OQntinued on Page Six)
4000 NSAXS COMPLETED
The Ann Arbor Red Cross has
completed the 4,000 masks ask-
ed for yesterday by the Univer-
sity authorities. It will start to-

FLU POSTPONES
CARUSO CONCERT
The Caruso concert which was to
have been given Saturday evening in
Hlil auditorium has been postponed
on account of the prevalence of in-
fluenza. A later date for the concert
will be announced in the near future.
When interviewed, Mr. Charles A.
Sink, secretary of the University
School or Music, said that he was in
sympathy with the order and glad to
comply with the request.
"One life is worth more than all
the entertainment curtailed because of
this order. In these days when there
is so much blood shed and so much
necessary loss of life in fighting for
the cause of humanity every precau-
tion should be taken to conserve need-
less sickness or death, and we are
glad to postpone any of our concerts
to aid in stamping out the epidemic,"
said Mr. Sink.
Good Thinlgs Come
toHim Who Waits
Announcement that a Student Di-
rectory is to be published very soon,
quiets the many fears to the contrary
which have been disturbing the cam-
pus. It is planned to publish the Di-
rectory In three parts. One is to be
issued at the beginning of every term.
This is to meet the difficulties of the
present military regime, naturally pre-
sented when so many men are con-
stantly arriving or leaving. The sys-
tem of cataloguing the names will be
a little different from that followed
in other years. It is expected that
the members of the S. A. T. C. will be
listed according to the barracks, in
addition to the usual alphabetical ar-
rangement. The first edition will ap-
pear in several weeks.
Beecher Smith, '22, has been ap-
pointed managing editor, and William
Wachs, '21, will be business manager.
Smith has been working on The Daily
this fall, in addition to previous ex-
perience on other publications. Wachs
was on The Daily last year and as-
sisted in putting out the Directory
this summer.
'16E MAN KILLED
IN PLANE BATTLE
Lieut. J. Martin Brown, '16E, of the
Canadian Royal Flying Corps, was
killed' in an airplane battle with the
Germans, Oct. 3. The news of his
death was received Monday in a ca-
blegram sent to his mother, Mrs. Jen-
nie Brown of Saginaw, by the British
Air Ministry.
Lieutenant Brown was a holder of
the Distinguished Flying Cross,
awarded for gallantry in action in
airplane fighting on the western
front. Ater his graduation from the
University he was assistant to Prof.
W. C. Hoad, and Prof. A. J. Decker,
in sanitary engineering.
FIRST GOLD STAl IN SERVICE
FLAG OF MICHIGAN DAILY
William T. Hollands, '13, of Ann
Arbor, died of pneumonia Monday eve-
ning at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe,
Ohio. Enlisting last February in the
6th ordinance training detachment, he
was sent from here to Camp Hancock,
thence to Camp Sherman. He had
just received his first furlough and
was intending to hear the Caruso con-

cert. The funeral will be tomorrow at
3 oclock.

THE MEDICAL FACULTIES,. TIiE HEALTH SEVI, AND
THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES OF T E UNIVERSITY ADVISE
THAT IN ORDER TO CONTROL TilE PRESENT INLUENZA EP-
IDEMIC IN TIlE UNIVERSITY, MEMBERS OF THE FACULTlES
AND ALL'STUDENTS WEAR, UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, FACE
MASKS WHILE ON THE rEETS AND CAMPUS. AT ALL
UNIVERSITY EXERCISES, AND IN ROOMING FlOUSEl. IT IS,
THEREFORE, SO ORDERED. TIlE UNIVERSITY WILL El.RNISII
MASKS WITH FULL DIRECTIONS FOR THEIR USE. TEY WILL
BE DISTRIBUTED IN THE SEVERAL CAMPUS BUILDINGS AND
AT THE HEALTH SERVICE, BEGINNING, FRIDAY MORNING,
OCT. 17, AT 7 O'CLOCK.
S ARRYEB. hUTChINS, PRESIDENT.

hiNG ('iIARI1Els TO(
RUSSIA'N s

ACCEPT RESIGNATION OF PREMIER; YAN
AIDVNCE IN DIRECTION OF WELSK;

BRITISH RECOGNIZE POLES AS ALLY

ENGLISH FORCING TURKS OUT OF HOLY LAND;
AUSTRIANS RETREAT IN ALBANIA AND SI
Soyiet Member Shoots Lenine, Bolshevik Leader; Central Powers A
Feeble Resistance to Heavy Blows on All Fronts; Entente
Armies Capture Many Prisoners -
(By the Associated Press)
Archangel, Oct. 15 (Delayed)-Allied forces, including the
('ails are engaged in repulsing heavy Bolshevik attacks on both ba
f.e Pvia river, 150 miles north of Kotlass, in the north region f
"'ole.
The Americans and Russians have advanced in the direction of
norteast of Volioga.

DOUBTEDAT CAPITL
\O011 1(ICI L WORD 01? i .XSh0S
ABDICATION OR TIIAT FO E
HAS REPLIEDI
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 16. - Tonig its
news of Germany is taken here as the
shadow of great events cast before
them.
There Is in Washington no official
word that the kaiser has abdicated,
or that he has been overthrown, or
that Germany is ready to accept all
of President Wilson's terms.
Officials and diplomats regard with
incredulity the intimations that one
or all of these things have happened.
The official opinion here in the council
is that the coming of these things is
timed only by the unknown factor,
the degree to which the German mil-
itary power has been broken.
The two peace questions in the
minds of public men tonight are, is.
the German military power so brok-
cn as to be ready to accept these
t1rm s? And the recurring question.
what has become of the kaiser?
Throughout the capital there is the
calm air of confidence mixed with
the evidence of determination.
Women Respond
Results from the special canvass
of women's dormitories and sorori-
ties by Mo tarboard and Wyvern in
the interests of the Fourth Liberty
Loan, have been meager. Up to yes-
terday. only one purchaser had sub-
scribed for 4 bond. A new plan is
being tried out, that of attempting
to interest each group to the extent
of subscribing to a bond collectively,
each girl to contribute a part in the
payment. In this manner several
girls can pool their resources and
purchase a bond together.
The campus booth is still being kept
open every afternoon by the women
volunteers, although subscriptions
are coming in slowly.
Several persons who had already
bought bonds for the Fourth Liberty
Loan have returned to the city loan
headquarters to double their sub-
scription, but the city is still $245,000
short of its quota.
The committee is putting forth
every effort to raise the required
amount and hopes that enough resi-
dents have sufficient civic pride to
buy more bonds and save Ann Arbor
.from falling short of its quota. The
slogan "To save the honor of Ann Ar-
bor" has been adopted and even those
who believe that they have bought
all that they are able to are asked

CITYHEALTHBOR
CLOSES PUBLIC PLACES
1T11EA'E MANAES TAKE OPTI-
MISTIC STAND IN REGARD TO
REE-OLPENING
In compliance with an order issued
by the city health department, thea-
ters, churches, dance halls, and all
places of public gathering have been
closed indefinitely.
'he mianagrs n the main are rath-
er optimistic about it. "Yes, we have
orders to close indefinitely," said Mr.
A. L. Stanchfield, of the Rae, "but
we're not objecting, how long? Well,
we can't tell that, perhaps two days,
perhaps two weeks." The Rae was
running a matinee, when asked about
it. Mr. Stanchfield replied that they
had been allowed to run the after-
noon show but had to close immedi-
ately after.
Mr. S. A. Moron, of the Arcade,
was not in his otlice, but his stenogra-
pher said that they, too, had orders
to close, and admitted that they would
spend somei of the time re-decorating.
"No one knows when we will open,"
was the opinion of Mr. Wuerth; "'no,
I am not under contract for the films,
mt if I were I would lose nothing, as
I could run the film at a later date.
The only extra expense would be to
get it back here, and the advertising
expense."
RESERVES REPORT
FOR ACTIVE DUTY

WAi BULLET'INS

HUNS RETIRE

London, Oct. 16.-The official press
bureau has been officially informed
that report published this afternoon
to the effect that Germany has cap-
itulated has no foundation.
Amsterdam, Oct. 16.- The Nieuwe
Routerdamsche Courant has with-
drawn its statement reporting the cap-
itulation of Germany and abdication
of Emperor William.
This step was taken, the newspaper
said, because it was unable to obtain
any confirmation of the report.
Kinig Charles Believes in Cabinet
Amsterdam, Oct. 16.-The Austrian
emperor has declared that he will ac-
cept the resignation of the cabinet
premier, Alexander Wekerle, accord-
ing to Budapest advices reaching here.
The emperor said he had full confid-
ence in the cabinet.
Amsterdam, Oct. 16.-Another at-
tempt has been made upon the life
of Nikohi Lenine, the Bolshevik prem-
ier, according to Lietzit dispatches.
Lenine received a bullet in the should-
er from a revolver fired by M. Dwan-
itzke, a member of the information
bureau of the Soviet.
British Recognize Polish Army
London, Oct. 16.-The British gov-
ernmnient has recognized the Polish
national army as automomous, allies,
and cobelligerents, according to an of-
ficial announcement tonight.
With the American Army Northwest
of Verdun, Oct. 16, (6 P. M.)-The
American troops today occupied the
town of Grandpre, on the north banks
of the Arre river, north of the Ar-
gonne forest.
eriimais Begin Big Retreat
With the Allied armies in Belgium,
Oct. 16, (4:30 P. M.)-The Germans
have started a retreat on a tremend-
ous scale in northern Belgium. French
cavalry are approaching Phielg, sev-
en miles from the banks of the Ghent-
Bruges canal. The canal itself is
only 10 miles from the border of Hol-
land. So fast is the enemy retreating
that the French, British, and Belgian'
infantry, at least in the center of the
double front, has lost touch entirely
with the enemy. The Belgians are
astride the Thourout-Bruges and
Thourout-Ostend roads, and are de-
feating the Germans, who are retreat-
ing rapidly.

Unconfirmed rumors are in
that Germany has capitulated a
Emperor William has abdicate
rumors came from Dutch and
sources, but as yet the Germa
ernment has not officially in
either the Washington nor th
don officials to consider the con
for a cessation of hostilities
down by President Wilson.
Allies Continue Gains
Meanwhile hostilities are p
ing without any slowing up a
forces of the Allies everywhe
defeating the enemy. In :
Flanders, Belgian troops pnde
Albert, French and British troc
sweeping forward for further
and driving the enemy out o
gium. On the French front in
the British, French and Am
are after the Germans.. They ar
ing progress, although slowl
withstanding the strenuous
that is being offered.
Both in Serbia and- Albania t
tente troops are ridding the :
district of the Austro-Hungari
German contingents. In Alban
are well to the north of Dura
the Adriatic sea, and in Serbia
siderable distance beyond Nis
the enemy falling back towar
frontiers of Austria-Hungary.
. Turks Lose Ground
In the Palestine theater the
cavalry has driven far to the
and northwest ofnDamascus,
reached Triopli, near the Mec
nean coast, and Homs, 85 mile
of Damascus. By this manoe
seemingly created a trap by
the Turkish armies may be
ed, as was the case in I
ly days of the offensive in
gion north of Jerusalem. The i
ver also may forecast a new d
(Continued from Page 0

About 20 active duty ord-rs were
received at S. N. T. C. headquarters
yesterday. All men enlisted in the
naval reserves who have been put on
inactive duty in order to return to
the University, should report immed-
iately at the headquarters of the S. N.
T. C. Upon reporting they iwll be
given active duty orders together with
pay and subsistance allowance for
board and lodging. It is of the utmost
importance that all men now in the
inactive service give this their close
attention, for the war department will
from now pay both tuition and living
expenses of these men.
crinaiy Has iBut 1,4S0 U. S. Prisoners
Washington, Oct. 16.-Only 1,480
American soldiers are held prisoners
in Germany, said an announcement
today from the office of the adjutant
general of the army.
No estimate was given of the num-
ber of German soldiers captured by
the Americans, but unofficially the
number was placed at not less than
50,000.
In addition to American soldiers
held prisoners in Germany, 220 Amer-
ican citizens are held at Constanti-
nople.

BULLETIN
The M. A. CG game wit
be played this Saturday!
Unofficial reports bringin
above statement to the atte
of Philip G. Bartelme, dir
of athletics at the Universi
Michigan, at a late hour,
received by the athletic dir
with all seriousness.
Athletic Director Bar
places the greatest confiden
the report, hie said last nigh
is of the opinion that it I
result of an order from the
department of health cailin
all public gatherings in the
until the influenza epiden
over.

morrow on a new quota of 6,000
more masks which must be com-
pleted before Saturday. All com-
mittees are asked to continue as
faithfully as they have been do-
ing for the past few days.
(Signed) MRS. L. P. HALL,
Chairman of Sewing

to reconsider.
There was $15,000 raised
$5,000 of which was subscribed1
man.

'02 Man Becoues Lieutenant-Colonel
Washington, Oct. 16. - Announce-
ment of the promotion of Major Fred-.
erick N. Newberry, '02, to Lieutenant-
Colonel of the Medical corps was made
yesterday.

today,
by one

CARUSO CONCERT POSTPONED ON

ACCOUNT

OF QUARANTINE IN THE CITY
NEW DATE WILL BE ANNOUNCED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

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