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October 16, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY D

_

IS TEIL
TENSIVE COURSE

ON MILITARY SCHEDULE
WILL REPLACE AT HOME
'HOSE SENT ABROAD'
re of the girls who took the
nonths' course in nurses train-
Vassar during the summer
are attending the training
here. Only college graduates
ligible to attend the course at
There were 418 girls from
leges, and 47 states were rep-
d in the group. The work in-
courses in chemistry, prac-
ursing, dietetics, bacteriology,
general a very intensive first
ursing course crowded into
nonths.
Kirls lived on a military sched-
e at 5:45 o'clock every morn-
d physical drill by squads,
at at 7 o'clock, classes from 8
o'clock every day. Dinner at
k and lights out at 10 o'clock.
?arched to class in companies
squads, and had sergeants and
ls who took the attendance.
irl dressed in the uniform of
ning school which she expect-
attend. They were free from
,y noon until Sunday night on
Ak ends, when they took trips
e country or up to the moun-
Dances were given on Satur-
ghts in conjunction with the
nit, also in training, but who
11 Vassar girls. They pub-
a small weekly paper called
'hermometer," which was of
to both the nurses in train-
the farmerettes.
ourse was intended as 'a hur-
rocess, so that the girls could
e the regular nurses' course
years. They are intended to
e demand for nurses at home
the place of those who are
service, abroad.
n College Closes Temporarily
mts attending Albion college
tified yesterday by the faculty
hat no more classes would
itil Tuesday, October 22. All
se who are members of the
s' army traIning corps may go
o remain until that time.

AMERICANS POUND
PAST HUN DEFENSE
(Continued from Page One)
fallen into the hands of the Allies.
The Allies have completely outflank-
ed the German submarine base at
Ostend and are now within 10 miles
of Bruges, which is the terminal for
all the railroads running through Zee-
brugge, Germany's other U-boat base
on the North Sea..'
Reports are to the effecb that the
Germans are withdrawing what is left
of their forces on the north, both naval
and military.
In Albania the Italians have occupi-
ed the Austrian naval base of Dur-
azzo, on the Adriatic, while in Serbia,
the Allied forces are continuing to
press the enemy troops north of Nish.
Celebrate Battle of St. Genevieve
With the American troops in France,
Oct. 15.-In a little shell-stricken
church in the town of Sainte Genev-
ieve, perched on a hill commanding a
view of Metz, Americans and French,
soldiers and civilians, Protestants and
Catholics, gathered today in solemn
celebration of the Battle of Sainte
Genevieve] foughtand won by the
French just. four years ago.
The village priest beamed with de-
light as he gazed upon his unusual
"flock" climbing up the hilly streets
which led to the church. In the shat-
tered belfry, with its gaping walls,
still swing two beautiful bells, and
these pealed out a joyous note as the
hour for early mass approached.
The little church was crowded with
men in khaki and horizon blue, with
a few old men in the more sombre
shades of civilian cloth, and women
and children gaily clad. The service
was as impressive as it was simple,
as the kindly priest asked blessings
upon the Americans.
French Honor General Gouraud
With the French Armies, .Oct. 15.-
one of the mostaimpressive military
reviews of the war took place recent-
ly when the various . units of the
French army, which swept the Ger-
mans back in the Champagne last
July, presented 48 battle-flags to their
commander, General Gouraud, the
one-armed hero of Gallipoli.
At a luncheon which followed 2,340
officers and men. each wearing one
or more of France's decorations for
distinguished service were in attend-
ance..

OFFICERS TO APPOINT
WEST POINT PROSPECTS
APPLICATIONS WILL BE RE-
CEIVED THROUGHOUT
THIS WEEK
Applications of candidates for ad-
mission to ,West Point will be re-
ceived today at the army, post, 548
South State street. All applicants
must be supplied with credentials
from Washington. These creden-
tials are based upon the recommen-
dations of congressmen of the dis-
tricts from which the men come.
A meeting of the men in charge
was held yesterday afternoon in Cap-
tain Ralph H. Durkee's office. The
committee of civilians appointed were:
Registrar Arthi G. Hall, chairman,
Prof. G. W. Patterson, Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw, and Prof. W. A. McLaugh-
lin. On the physical examining board
were placed Capt. B. C. Vaughan and
Lieut. G. W. McCaskey, medical offi-
cers, and Lieut. W. K. Montague,
Lieut. J. P. Norvall, and Lieut. J. D.
Balkan, line officers.
Applicationsfwillbe received and
examinations will be held each day
throughout the remainder of. the
week. The examinations will consist
of two parts, namely, mental and
physical. The physical test will be
quite rigid. In the mental test the
applicant will be quizzed on the fol-
lowing subjects: English (language
and composition), history (medieval
and modern), geography, algebra, and
plain geometry. The questions which
comprise the mental examinations are
sent out from Washington.
Although the number of applicants
is not yet known, authorities expect it
to be large.. The names of the men
accepted will be announced within the
next three weeks. Only one man from
each congressional district in the
state is taken. As high as five men
apply from each district.
Saginaw Lads Give Saturday Service
Saginaw, Oct,. 15.-Evincing their
patriotism and willingness to do any-
thing to help win the war, all the
boys of the Saginaw high school have
volunteered for service with the Unit-
ed States labor bureau after school
and on Saturdays. One of their first
assignments will be the pulling of
90 acres of beets.

Pouor Ole Dobbin
Laughs on Suuday
New York, Oct. 15.-There is no
need to "'watch your step" on Broad-
way these gasless Sunday nights.
Without :ho steady flow of mo-
tor vehicles that formerly kept the
traffic squad as busy on the "day of
rest" as any other, the asphalt seems
all but deserted.
"'ansom, sir!"
The once-familiar salutation, all but
forgotten during a generation of au-
tomobile supremacy, smites the ear.
The cabby has come into his own
again. Horses that had been de-
moted to common equine labor have
been recalled to their former places
between the curved shafts. Vehicles
of the eighties and nineties - two-
wheeled and four-wheeled-have been
resurrected from the dust and cob-
webs of livery stables which, once a
week, have, taken on some of their
ancient activity.
Between Thirty-third and Fifty-
ninth streets tonight traffic policemen
stood listlessly at their posts. Whis-
tles that usually signal "Go" and
"Stop" were stilled. Cabbies cut cor-
ners, and no imperious hand bade
them halt. Pedestrians dodged diag-
onally across the street, and the blue-
coats did not interfere. Traffic, with-
out the automobile, was not traffic }n
their eyes.
From the outset the metropolis has
complied in every particular with the
government request to conserve gas-
oline, and though many lines of activ-
ity have been curtailed, predictions of
a "blue Sabbath" have not been ful-
.filled. New York has been slowed up,
but hardly sobered by the gasless Sun-
days.
The Daily at your door, $3.50.
I r

IWHAT'S GOING ON_/

TOMORROW
3:00-The Sarah Caswell Angell
chapter of the Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution will meet at the home
of Mrs. William G. Doty, 408 South
Fifth avenue.
7:30-The first regular meeting of
the Senior society will be held.at the
Westminster club.
Loan Far Behind Daily Schedule
Washington, Oct. 14. -- Unaffected
by proposals of peace by Germany, the

to subscribe at least three billion dol-
lars in the next six days to the
Fourth Liberty Loan.
Reports to the Treasury Department
today, based on information received
from each of the 12 Federal Reserve
districts, showed total subscriptions
received through banks and trust com-
panies amounting to only $2,500,000,-
000.
New classes in Shorthand and Type-
writing formed Monday, October 14, at
The School of Shorthand, 711 N. Uni-
versity Ave.-Adv.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv.

Laboratory Supplies
Students Chelicals
Students Toilet Articles
Sundries
THE EBERBACH & SON CO.
202-204 East Liberty Street

COMPLETE

LINE OF

HOSPITAL and

OWN A
CORONA
The light
portable
typewriter.
Weighs 6/ lbs. Over 175,000 in
use. Indorsed by the U. S. Gov-
ernment. Price complete, with
case, $50.00.,
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
Typewriters bought and sold

LAB COATS

WADHAMS & CO.

MAIN ST.

s f " "

STATE ST.

0 "

ze -our advertisers.-Adv.

4,

It

i

I

I r

r I 11

_. _ _ _ _
y

r

I

'IVE

STAR

CONCERTS

FIVE

CARUSO-HIMSELF, assisted by NINA MORGANA, Prima Donna,

Soprano

Metropolitan Opera; ELIAS BREESKIN, Distinguished Russian Violinist, SALVATORE
FUCITO and ISAAC VANGROVE, Pianists
HILL AUDITORIUM, Ann Arbor

ALL CONCERTS CHANGED TO SATURDAY NIGHTS

ENRICO CARUSO
SATURDAY, OCT. 19

LEOPOLD GODOWSKY
SATURDAY, DEC.14

TOSCHA SEIDEL
SATURDAY, FEB. 8

JOSEPH BONNET
SATURDAY, JAN.18

ANNA CASE

SATURDAY, NOV.16

CARUSO Ticket Sales Begins at 8 o'clock SATURDAY MORNING at SCHOOL OF MUSIC

$2.50

- $3.50

- $4.00

- $5.00

SOME GOOD COURSE TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE AT $4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.00 INCLUDING CARUSO CONCERT
MR. CARUSO USES THE HARDMAN PIANO EXCLUSIVELY. TOUR UNDER TH E DIRECTION OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSICAL BUREAU, NEW YOR' CITY

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