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April 04, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-04

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HIE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
WARNER

LL

Mw trtgau

Iatj~l

ASSCIATED
PRESS.
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 132. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1919. PRICE THREE CEN

WILSONAND THREE
LEAGUEs ISSUES-
NO TANGIBLE RESULTS AFTER
COUNCIL'S TEN DAYS'
.' LABQR
SITUATION SERIOUS
BUT NOT DESPERATE
French Assured Military Protection
Along Rhine But Desre Ter-
ritorial Control
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 3.-President Wilson
and Premier Lloyd George, Clemen-
ceau and Orlando continued their dis-
cussion at the President's residence
today. Other peace conference .offi-
cials also met. All the conferees tend-
ed to unravel the tangled issues still
standing in the way of peace.
The meeting proceeded amid another
wave of apprehension spreading
through the. conference over lack of
any tangible results after the council
of four had labored continuously for
10 days.
Situation Serious
This was acompaned by well found-
ed reports from those close in touch
with the council of ofur showing that
the situation though not desperate was
at least serious because of radical
difference on some fundamentals in
the settlement of Germany's western
frontier, the Franco-German and the
eastern Polish frontiers.
One of the American experts who
is' constantly being consulted on va-
rious questions before. the conference
giyes the following glimpse of what
is going en behind the scenes:
Boundary Troubles
"The situation is extremely difficult
prticularly as regards the western
frontier of Germany. President Wil-
son in a concilatory spirit has been
willing to do most anything to assure
Fveneh security short of the stultifi-
cation of engagements made at the
time of the armistice.
"The French have been assured of
every mlitary protection along the
(continued o Page Six)
ACADEMYT OF SCIENCES
OPENISSSIONS ToODAY
PRESENT CONVENTION XARKBD
BY UNUSUAL1Y GOOD
LECTURES
The second meeting of the twenty-
fourth convention of the Michigan
Academy of Science will open with a
council meetig which is to be held
in room Z 231, Natural Science build-
ing at 8:30 o'clock Friday morning.
At 9 o'clpet there will be meetings
of all sections except those who com-
ploted their programs on Thursday
afternpoon At thee meetings there
Will be the reading of papers and the
nominations ' of vice-presidents and
editors
Biologists Uold Lun4cheou
-l'ollwing the sectional conferences
is luncheon for the biologists will b
held at 1 o'clock I room B 100, Na
tural lScience building. Tickets for
this luncheen may be obtained at the
At -1;30 o'clock in the afternoon
there will be a general meeting of the
R emyin room B 207, Natural Sci-
enCs building at which the election
of o ficers and members will take
place. A meeting of the section of
economics will take place at 2 o'clock
in the afternoon.
Public Lecture To Be Given

A public address will be given by
Gerald H. Thayer on the "Camouflage
in War and Nature," in Hill auditor-
ium. This lecture will be open to the
public.
The presidential address was given
at 8 o'clock Thursday evening in the
Natural Science auditorium by Prof.
Frank T. Carlton on the subject of
'Thp i man lepent in Industry."
A sngpr was also given to the inem-
ben fthe ecaemy in the rooms of
the Uilivgrsity club in Alumni Mem-
prigl hpll fter the address on Thurs-
dl~y evening~

OPERA TRIP TO BE
MADE BY 106 MEN
With bag and baggage, the 106
opera men will leave Monday morning
in three special pullman cars and two
baggage cars.
Two of the pullmans have 12 com-
partments and the other one has ten.
For the entire week the cars will be
the living quarters for th@ men, and
arrangements are being made, to
handle their personal baggage.
The entire cast and chorus is going.
S. W. Sedgwick, '19, and H. Lltsitz,
'21E, have been added to the cast. All
directors, property men, stage man-
agers, the orchestra, and musical di-
rector are booked for the trip. The
chaperon has not yet been appointed
by the faculty in charge of this. The
following men from the other commit-
tees have been selected: C. Norton,
H. Braun, M. Peattie, J. Reilly, W.
Reiss, A. King, and A. Gornetsky. Mr.
J. Hershfield and Mrs. Herschfield will
be in charge of making-up the actors.
Four professional men have been en-
gaged to assist behind the scenes with
the properties and scenery. Miss
Marie Schanz will be the dressmaker.
Donal H. Haines, author of the
opera book, will not accompany the
men on the trip but will be present
at the performance in Kalamazoo.
PROF. SCOTT ADDRESSES
CLASSICAL CONFERENCE

GERMAN STRIKES
STOPPEDBY QUICK
ACTION OFTROOPS

ALL IN READINESS
FOR GRAND MARC
TO LAUNCH H

SERIOUS
ONLY

VIOLENCE REPORTED
FROM DISTRICT OF
ESSLINGEN

PROGRAMS FOR WOMEN
IN THE FORM OF
SOUVENIRS

TO

ADDRESS ALSO GIVEN
MARY HINAE
GRANDVILLE

BY
OF

DR.

Prof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric de-
partment, delivered a paper Thursday
afternoon at the classical conference
of (he Schoolmasters' club on "Fa-
miliar Quotations: A Suggestion."
Dr. Mary L. Hinsdale, superintendent
of the schools of Grandville, spoke on
"A Sane Schoolmaster's View of the
Study of Latin." ,
"By acquainting students with
choice sayings from the original class-
ics," said Professor Scott, "the stu-
dents will be enthused with a desire to
obtain a better knowledge of their
source." Professor Scott traced the
descent of many well known phrases
and sayings, back to their origin in
the original Latin or Greek.
Dr. Hinsdale's paper dealt with the
importance and necessity of the study
of Latin. "Language," she said, "is
the greatest means of education that
we possess."
COUNCIL REPORTS
ON WATER METERS
Everyone who has to spend his days
in the University city is interested in
the question of good water for Ann
Arbor. On Monday, April 7, the city
is to vote upon a bond issue of $75,-
000 to buy water meters so asto con-
serve the good water from the Steere
farm. To settle, as far as is possible
in advance, some of the questions of
importance to the voters the common
council last night adopted a commit-
tee report which was in substance as
follows:
If the proposed $75,000 bond issue
is approved at the coming election it
will be the desire of the council to
secure the adoption and operation of
a new schedule of water rates which
shall include the following features:
A minimum charge of 50 cents a
month to acustomer, with an allow-
ance of 50 cents worth of water under
this minimum, instead of the "service
charge" of 50 cents a month as pre-
viously discussed;
A quantity schedule with a rate for
small consumers not higher than the
present meter rate of 20 cents a thous-
and gallons, and as much lower as
operating conditions may permit;
A fair distribution of the burden of
the water plant among domestic, com-
mercial, industrial and other classes
of water consumers, and among in-
rividual users of the same class.
A total income from operation equal
to the actual cost of supporting the
water plant plus 10 percent of such
cost to provide for ordinary exten-
sions; and a revision of rate sched-
ules whenever necessary to hold the
total income approximately to this
point.

MOVEMENT AN EFFORT
.TO OVERTHROW GOVT
Victims Number 16; Many Wounded;
Damage Aggregates Several
Million Marks
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, April 3.-The strikes both at
Stuttgart and in the Ruhr claim to
have been stopped by the energetic ac-
tion of the government in the prompt.'
use of troops, martial law and other
salutory means.
Official reports from Stuttgart sum-
marizing the situation there say that
serious violence is reported only from
Esslingen, where the Spartacans seiz-
ed women and automobiles but sur-
rendered them after negotiation. A
large number of non-residents among
the strikers was one of the features
of the uprising, going to prove that
the movement was as plannedamerely
a political effort of the radicals and
independents to overthrow the gov-
ernment.
The strikers at Stuttgart assembled
frequently yesterday despite the mar-
itial law regulations but were dis-
persed. The leaders were arrested by
the troops and the government was
master of the situation by nightfall.
The troops behaved splendidly though
some of them received rough treat-
ment.
In the Ruhr district for a time the
strike was extended by several thou-
sand but there is danger of a general
strike.
The situation at Frankfort is quiet
again. The number of victims of the
riot has reached 16, which number
will probably be augmented as some
of the wounded cannot live. The
damage from plunder is estimated to
aggregate several millioD marks.
DR0,DVIS15 491RTURNS
AFTER MONTHS OERSES
ENLISTED IN OCTOBER, 1917;
LATER TRANSFERRED TO
HOSPITAL WORK
After 18 months' service along the
French front and in civilian work,
Dr. Clara Davis, '04M, has returned to
Ann Arbor for a few days. Her ex-
periences were distinctive and she
served only as a few women doctors
were allowed to.
Enlisting in October, 1917, she went
across with the work of the Ameri-
can Fund for French wounded, in
which unit she did civilian work. Lat-
er she was transferred to the French
Mobile Hospital service and from then
on she worked with the French exclu-
sively. In regard to these people she
said, "I would be happy to know, if,
had there been a war in this country,
our women could have the dignity,
poise and calm perseverance of those
brave French women."
Last Christmas while on the Bel-
gian front her unit was joined by the
University of Michigan ambulance
unit and she says it was gladdening
to meet men from her alma mater.
These two units had Christmas din-
ner together.
Dr. Davis says that with the rapid
disbanding of the Red Cross and the
American fund for French wounded,
there is not a great call for the aid
of American women, although the Al-
lies still need, and will for a long time,
the financial backing and supply of
material in order to restore their de-
vastated lands.
Dr. Davis will remain, the rest of
this week as the guest of Mrs. E. D.
Kinne.
Dr. Devi will be entertained at 8
'cloclk Friday night with a formal re-
ception at the Gamma Phi Beta house.
More than $00 guests from the liter-
ary and medical faculties and resi-
dents of Ann Arbor are expected to be
present,

Karl H. Velde, '20, chairman of the
Hop committee, has supervised all de-
tails of the undertaking. He has seen
to it that everything has reached that
stage of perfection which will greet
the hoppers this evening.
David D. Nash, '20, has been the cor-
responding secretary and the treasur-
er. He has handled all the finances.
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, received the
bids for the decorations and booths,
and has had charge of assigning the
booths.
John S. Perrin, '20, secured the music
and carried on all the correspondence
necessary for obtaining the orches-
tras.
David B. Landis, '20, arranged for
the programs and acted as publicity
agent.
Harrly Vorys, '20D, has made ar-

rangements for the serving of the
punch and wafers.
Waldo G. Harbert, '20E, chairman
of the ticket committee, arranged for
the new method of ticket distribution
and collected all the war tax. ,
Joseph Palma, '20M, will be master
of ceremonies this evening, and will
arrange for all changes of music.
Frank J. Helbig, '20Ph, has assisted
in all the final arrangements and will
assist the master of ceremonies.
Joseph V. Tracy, '20E, assisted in
the selection of the programs and oth-
er detail work.
Newell E. Lavely, '20H, assisted in
the decorations and in other ways.
Lester A. Abel, '20A, worked in We
arrangingfor decorations and the final
work.
George Struckman, '20L, helped in
the gymnasium decorations.

IlHoP*Committees ,"
Top Row-ABEL, STRUCKMAN, HAR BERT, TRACY, LAVELY, HELBIG
Bottom Row-PALMA, HOGAN, LANDIS, VELDE, NASH, PERRIN

"GOLD" ACCLAIMED
I-MMENSE SU~CESS
Pauline Benedict Fischer Shows Skill
in Mingling Moral Allusions
With Interesting Plot
MANY PROMINENT ALUMNAE
VISIT ANN ARBOR FOR PLAY
(By Marguerite Clark)
(Because of the small space which
it was necessary to apportion the Jun-
ior Girls' play story in the last issue
of The Daily, and because of the high
merit of the production, a formal re-
view of the play is given in this is-
sue.)
Has All egorleaPlot
That every student who comes to the
University is searching for gold and
nothing more was the supposition
which "The Devil," Harriet Wood-
worth, attempted to prove to Fixette,
queen of Sprites, Myrna Goodrich, and
it must be said he succeeded. But the
kind of gold sought, it was found, is
not always of the sort that pick and
shovel ply from the ground. Eve
Templeton, The Vamp, Margaret Jew-
ell, succeeded in getting-by marrying
-the kind one carries in the purse;
and Fluffy, Ruth Abbott, found the
gold she sought when she won the
love of Harry, Grace Hall.
Transforms Devil
As Fixette tells The Devil, it is the
gold within ourselves that is mighty
over all else, and she, in turn, proves
it to him by winning him for herself
and bringing about his transformation
from The Devil to a devoted wood
sprite.
On this allegorical background is
built up the most beautiful of musical
plays.
The author, Pauline Benedict-Fisch-
er, used considerable skill in bringing
in many subtle allusions of a moralis-
tic nature, and the parts were so ar-
ranged that an unusually large num-
ber of people were given opportunity
to display their skill in stage acting..
19 Songs Are Hits
There were 19 song hits rendered,
each one distinguished by some feat-
ure and a chorus. The "Baby Ben"
(Continued on Page Six)

PLAUTUS APPEARS
IN'.MODERN ILNGO
Funny Situations Are Many and Are
Made the Most of by the
Actors
"MUCH WOO'D MAIDEN" IS
PLAYED AT UNIVERSITY HALL
Pautus in the breezy vernacular of
1919 is the amusing combination which
characterized the Classical club's pro-
duction of "The Much Woo'ed Maid-
en," Thursday night in University
hall.
The play was adapted with con-
siderable freedom from Plautus' "Ca-
sina," although it is probable that the
effect on the audience was much the
same as was the effect of the original
play upon the audience for which it
was written. Much of the humor,
however, is due to the odd effect of
up-to-date slang coming from the
mouths of characters garbed in class-
ic robes.
W. Kieth Chidester, '20, was the star
of the performance in the leading role
of Lysidamus, the gay, but rather fee-
ble old gentleman who plans to elope
with Casina and thus escape his tem-
pestuous wife. In spite of his clever
scheme he is foiled by the still more
clever scheme of a rival, who imper-
sonates Casina in an effort to save her
for himself. "The Much Woo'd Maid-
en, however. will have none of them
and is eventually re-united to her true
lover.
Considerable credit for the. excellent
performance given is due Mr. George
D. Wilner and Dr. Orma F. Butler,
who directed the production and cos-
tuming, respectively. A large meas-
ure of the success is also due to the
well-selected cast, which xmade the
most of the amusing situations.
Vacation Hop Shortens k Gym Work
Gymnasium classes were closed
earlier this year than they have .been
for several seasons. The change in
time of the J-Hop is held responsible
as the new time interferred seriously
with Dr. May's work as well as the
track practice.

THIRTY HOUSE PARTIES
PLANNED AFTERWARD.
Twenty-Six Dance Nuinbers to B
Played by Benson's Orchestra
and by Wright's
To the tune of "Victors," the gran
march 'of the 1919 Junior Hop, head
ed by Miss Elizabeth Bade of Chicag
and Karl Velde, '20, chairman of th
Hop committee, will begin at 9 o'cloc
Friday night in Waterman gyman
slum.
Followed by the remaining 12 mem
bers of the committee, Karl Velde an
Miss Bade will lead the march fro
Booth 2, the Phi elta Theta booth, an
circle the ball room, during which th
couples will fall in behind by booth
until the 550 couples are all march
ing.
Flashlight to Be Taken
After wending its way through va
rious figures the procession wilFbfinall;
end in the formation of a perfect l
at which time the picture for the J
Hop extra will be taken. After th
flashlight, the orchestra will breal
into the first dance, and the Hop wil
have begun.
Thirty-four booths encircle the floo
and will serve as lounging places be
tween dances. Above the floor bunt
ing of various colors are draped
Streamers extend from the runninug
track to the center. Pink lamps witl
bluebirds hang down from the ceiling
and together with the pink shades
which are placed on the posts of th
booths, furnish a system of diffuse
lighting which will lend an enchant,
ing glow to the ball room.
Fraternities Decorate
Fraternities were at work Thgrsda)
afternoon placing their furniture an
attractively decorating the interior o
their booths. All this work must be
completed by 3 o'clock- Friday after-
non in order that the work of cleaning
up may be commenced.
Programs Are Attractive
0 Attractive rrograms of soft gree
mission leather will be given each in
dividual. The ladies' programs ar
very unique, being in the shape o1
pocketbooks, which may be retainec
by the guests as souvenirs.
The gentlemen's programs are muh
simpler, and are more like a siail
book. On the front is a seal of th
University. The dance numbers ar
arranged two on a page, with the
dance number, the kind of dance, the
music to be played, the space for part
ner's name, and a place for inscrib
ing memories. The list of chaperones
and the J-Hop committee occupya
place in the back.
(Continued on Page Six)
PROF. WILLIAMS TO LECTURE
UPON USE OF VACUUM TUBES
Prof. N. H. Williams of the physics
department will lecture at 2:30 o'clocl
Friday afternoon in the west lecture
room of the physics building on th
use of vacuum tubes in radial commu
nication.
Research work has been going o
for the past couple of weeks in this
work and the result of it will for
the basis of the talk. The lecture wil
be third in a series of educationa
dissertations given for the benefit o:
the Schoolmasters' club.
HOP EXTRAS ISSUED
A special J-Hop edition of
The Michigan Daily will be sold
at the gymnasium at 12 o'clock
Friday night.
A second edition of the extra
will be on sale Saturday morn-
I ing after $ o'clock at Cushing's
l Drug Store, The Delta, Sugdens'
J Drug Store, Calkins' Drug Store,
and the Students' Supply Store.

l1 lition Doliverod

WATCH FOR THE J-HOP EXTRA OF

at the Hop
Midnight

THE

MICHIGAN

DAiLY

2nd Edition Delivered
to Fraternities
Saturday Morning
with Picture of
Grand March
PRICE 10 CENTS

Sold on streets
PRICE 10 CENTS

ON SALE AT ALL STUDENT STORES

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