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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 01, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGS rrv

i

"J-HOP" time is here again and the girls must look

their best.

I

In the preparations, the dressing of their hair rightly takes

first place.

It is not wise or safe to take any risk by using an

ordinary curling iron, indifferently heated.

The ELECTRIC CURLING IRON is safe, conven-
ient and always ready for use-just atacht to any lamp
socket-and works far better than the ordinary curler.

Let us show you.

THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY

WILLIAM AND MAIN STREETS

Ann Arbor, Mich.

F.,
I" N

Golf Suits

Riding Vreeches

Di. F. GRENNAN

Custom Tailor

Original Designs

Now Open for Business

No News Today'
Read This And
"Any news in the Forestry depart-
ment?" asked the reporter for The
Daily.
"Why, no," answered one of the fac-
ulty. "Except that they're wrecking
the old Medical-Surveying buildings
over on the east side of the campus
and the secretary of the interior has
made a report to congress and the
head of the United States forest ser-
vice has addressed the Boston cham-
ber of commerce. That might make
news."
"Doesn't seem very exciting," re-
marked the reporter.
"Maybe that's because you never had
economics 97-b," suggested the pro-
fessor. "As a matter of fact the sit-
uation is bad enough to warrant
scare-heads."
"What situation?" asked the report-
er. pulling out his wad of copy paper
in a bored and professional manner.
"Michigan's" answered the profess-
or. "One-third of the state has gone
into bankruptcy, as it were."
"No!" exclaimed the reporter, "flow
come?"
"Lack of tangible assets," exclaimed
the professor. "Secretary Lane says
the state has 11686,000 acres of log-
ged-off lands which are a picture of
desolation calculated to daunt the
hardiest pioneer and to be duplicated
only in the shell-shattered ex-forests
of France."
"Nice idea," remarked the reporter.
'Michigan's Belgium' would make
some head, wouldn't it? ow'd it
happen?'
"Oh, just the regular lumbering plus
fire. Good old-fashioned American
'development,' you know. 'What did
posterity do for me' and so forth.
"Same old line of 'conservation'
dope," said the reporter disappointed-
ly. "Can't we get a new slant on it,
somehow?"j
"Might," answered the professor,
thoughtfully. "Pver hear that four or
five million acres of land were tax-
delinquent in Michigan, every year?
Know that 32 outfits own one-sixth of
all the state? Or that the cut-over
forest land east of the Mississippi
would make ten states the size of
Iowa?"
"Just figures," protested the report-
er. "What's the picture?"
"Left my comet's-hair brush home,
today," answered the professor. "But
how'd it do to say that Grand Rapids
furniture was being made from wood
shipped a thousand miles and De-
troit's automobile wheel hickory most-
ly came from Arkansas or that Petos~-
key canned goods were crated in Id-
aho pine? Or that Ann Arbor folks
were building places to live out of
Lousiana cypress and Mississippi
short-leaf and California red wood, and
reading papers made in California
mills from Canadian spruce. Shingles
from British Columbia and . ."
asked the reporter. "Don't those kinds
of lumber make all-right houses and
things ?"
"Sure," admitted the professor.
"Only how'd it strike you if you heard
that the Keeweenaw had to go to Butte
for its ores or that Iowa was import-
ing corn from the Argentine, or Cal-
ifornia had to get its oranges from
Cuba ?"
"Oh!" said the reporter, scribbling.
"Where'd the old campus buildings
fit in?"
"Built in Civil war times of gen-
uine old Michigan cork-pine, you
know. Better not mention that,
though," said the professor.
"Why not?"
"Superintendent of buildings and
gropuds might kick, ipoople might
urry off the lumber for mementos and
curiosities. You couldn't buy lumber
like that for love or money, today.
Buffalo, passenger pigeon and Michi-
gan white-pine. They ought to put a
few pieces of it in the museum along-
side aneconomic map of the state and
a picture of Michou."
"And hang crepe over the outfit?"

suggested the reporter hopefully.
"Who was the Frenchmaa."

I

"Old forester. He prospected around
in our forests about a hundred years.
ago and then left his fortune to the
United States as an endowment to
encourage the intelligent use of their
forests by Americans."
"Good old sport," remarked the re-
porter, approvingly. "Suppose he got
his money's worth when those regi-
ments of American foresters lit in
France in time to get out the timber
for all those ports and camps and
hospitals and things? What was that
.bout the Boston chamber of com-
merce?"
"Oh, that?" said the professor. "Why
the head of the forest service men-
tioned that Michigan's freight bill on
heer imported lumber would pay for
reforesting around 500,000 acres of
[waste land a year."
"What!" said the reporter.
"You misunderstood me. I refer-
red to the eleven million acres of non-
productive land," reproved the profes-
sor.
"Why don't they do it?"
"Coming up. The state forester is
raising some millions of trees in his
nurseries up on the state forest, and
planting 'em out and getting 'em to
grow-but it's all a sort of drop in
a bucket. If every tree the lumber-
men and the state ever planted were
big and ripe and in saw-logs at the
mills, those logs wouldn't keep the
saws going two minutes, you kinow."
"No, I didn't," murmured the report-
er, getting up to go. "Why don't they
speed up before the rest of it chases
off after the white-pine?"
"Search me,"answered the profes-
sor. "Maybe they haven't had econu-
omics 97-b."
So that's all the day's news at the
Forestery department.
IHomeop. Grad to Practice In Alpena
Dr. William Bergstrum, '17H, having
served his internshlp in Hahnemann
hospital, will engage in general medi-
cine and surgery April . at Alpena,
Mich.

Says Professor;
judge For Yourself

SERVE-SELF

11 S. U.

I

We do our okrn Cooking and guarantee Courteous Service
Try our home-made Pies and Cakes

RANDALL STUDIO
ESTABLISH ED 1887
Groups and Portraits by Photography
121 E. Washington St. Phone 598
O REN'S

UNIVERSITY Y. X. C. A. TO DO
SOCIAL WORK AT HOSPITAL
Social service work is to be under-
taken at the University hospital by
members of the University Y. M. C. A.
A group of boys between the ages of
7. and 12, confined in that institution
because of lameness or other physical
defects, will be taken in charge.
Classes in the common school
branches will be opened soon, to ex-
tend through the remainder of the
semester during five days of each
week. In addition to the scholastic
work, regular recreation periods for
the boys will be conducted.
J. F. Goodwillie, '20E, has been ap-'
pointed as chairman of the social serv-
ice committee. Men who are willing
to volunteer their services for the
work outlined, between the hours of 2

Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M.
Tel.

Saturday night until 2 A. M.
2642J

and 4 any day of the week, including
Sunday, are asked to communicate
with him.
SATURDAY MORNING CLASSES
FOR ALL LAWS NEXT YEAR
Due to an increase in the number of
courses and the many subsequent
conflicts, it will be necessary to hold
classes on Saturday forenoon in the
Law school beginning next semester.
Dean Bates gave out this informa-
tion Monday, saying that the change
will be necessitated in order to se-
cure satisfactory schedules for law
students.
TAXI FOR THE HOP
You can still make reservations
with us for J-Hop service. Ann Arbor
Taxi Co. Phone 1300.-Adv.

" -..-. . .5..w.

f

14 Nickels Arcade

MrP Amateur Photographer:

WORK FOR EASTER VACATION
Several students are now woring
spare time. N. , C. has averaged 65c
per hour; K. H., 90c; M. T., $1.05; B.
F., $1.10; N. H,, $1.30; E. D. K., $1.50,
0. R. (a young lady freshman), $1.70.
No, they are not salesmen-just or-
dinary students with "self-starter"
dispositions and a need for money. If
you want to do some honest work call
us up and see if we can be of service
to you. Will pay wages also, but not
so much as above. These people gre
working for themselves. Paone (,
Today.-Adv.
Use the mazy to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
marning.--Adv.

Who is your Doctor?
Who treats your films?

Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new liti. of
PARIS FASHIONS.
Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses

I

Newest materials, newest models, newest colorings,
lowest prices

and

Who do you go to when you want to be SURE to get the
best possible results?
Do you go to a regular H. T. G. PHOTOGRAPH ER, or
do you go to J. Doe & Co., who take in "Finishing?"
Why pay good money for films, go to the trouble to take
just the "snaps" you want, and then let some one spoil them
for you in developing?
PHOTOGRAPHY has been PARTICULAR BUSINESS
for the PAST 15 YEARS right here among MTICHIGAN STU-
DENTS. I have led while others have failed simply because I
have "delivered the goods." If you want "RESULTS" you
will come to me.

7~f~C4~O~t~Gfl

i

!'

ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL,
ARTISTS:
Rosa Ponselle, Anna Fitziu, -Lois M. Johnston sopranos; Louise Homer, Merle Al-
cock, Minerva Komenarski, contraltos; Fernando Carpi, Arthur Hackett, tenors;
Emilio deGogorza, Robert R. Dieterle, Baritones; Andres deSegurola, Gustaf Holm-
quist, Basses; Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Pianist; Charles M. Courboin, Earl V. Moore,
Organists.
Organizations: Chicago Symphony Orchestra, University Choral Union.
Conductors: Albert A. Stanley, Frederick Stock

I GUARANTEE EVERY JOB OR NO PAY

Lyndon

Choral Works:

"Ode to Music" (Hadley), "Faust" (Gounod), "Fair Land of Free-
dom" (Stanley);

The Home of the KODAK in Ann Arbor. 709 N. University Ave.
Open every evening until 8 P. M.
Drop films in Chute after hours
Those who, advertise in The Mich- Michigan's paper for Michigan men.
igan Daily pater to ALL Michigan Four thousand students read it every
students.-Adv. morning.--.Adv.
Leave Copy eveCp
Quarry's and Quarry's and
The DeltaE T NRa

Tickets: $4.50, $5, $6, $7-Now on Sale at University School of Music

MICHIGAN'S

GREATEST MUSICAL

EVENT

ml.
ml.

r
. .....
.. __

..

1 -I,_

The changing Winds make

for

To Students who have been in the

WArfTED
WANTED - As soon as possible a
dentist registered in Michigan. Fifty
dollars a week guaranteed. A. +G,
Rickel, 202 1-2. Washington Ave.
Lansing, Mich.
WANTED - Porter for fraternity
house. References requested. Phone,
16.
WANTED- Several men for spring
vacation work in and around De-
troit., 420 Lightner Buldg., 56 La-
fayette Blvd. Detroit, Apply as
soon as possible.
WANTED-Students who want work
read article "Work for Easter Vaca-
tion," in today's Daily.
WANTED-A few men who do not go
home to work Spring Vacation. Fair
wages. Apply 721 N. University to-

WANTED
WANTED-Five students to work near
Anen Arbor next week. Phone 227M-W
between six and eight tonight only.
LOST
I40ST-White Bull Terrier dog, male,
about 18 inches high, ears cut, tail
long, no collar. Please notify L.
GuthriE 521 E. Jefferson. Phone
1422--l. h eward.
LOST- A gold wrist watch, bearing
initials M. 1t.; between Nyew haven,
Moni'oe, East Vivrivand lCin-
pus. Reward. ; e 2312
LOST-Pair of browni tortoise-rim-
med glasses. Phone 2435-J.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Pleasant front suite one
half block from the campus, on
Washtenaw Ave. Double decker
beds. Phone 1283-J.

Chapped Hands and Face
USE
Dermal Cream and
Cold Cream
MADE BY
Quarry Drug Co.~s
Pr escription Drug Store
COB. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 308

Military or Naval Service

of the Country

I

I

The Faculty of the Law School of the University of Michigan
has arranged a special course for the Summer Session of 1919 and
the first semester of the year 1919-1920, in which course the stu-
dent is allowed to carry an amount of work slightly in excess of
the normal amount and thus gain the equivalent of a year of
credit. The saving of time for students who may be discharged
from the army or navy before June 23 will thus be considerable
and of great importance in aiding them to secure early admis-
sion to the bar. The course will include all subjects of the reg-
ular curriculum and will be given in the regular way by the Law
School staff.
Students desiring to take advantage of this course must pre-
sent official evidence of their military or naval service.
For particulars address the Dean of the University of Michi-
gan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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