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April 01, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-01

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HE WEATHER
[R NOT QUITE SO COLD
TODAIf

Ap 4I

Dattv

ASSOCiA TED
PRESSJ
DAY AND NIGHT WhR
SEBYICE

I .r nIy--

VOL. XXIX. No. 129. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

PERMANENT BORD
FINTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE TO MEET AT SEAT
OF LEAGUE OF NATIONS
EVERY YEAR
BOTH EMPLOYERS AND
WORKMEN HAVE VOTES
First Session of German Financial
Agents With Peace Commission
Held at Compiegne
(By Associated Press)
London, March 31.-The completed
draft of the convention creating a
permanent organization for the pro-
motion of labor interests and inter-
national regulation of labor conditions
consists of 41 articles.
Meetings of the general conference
will be held at least once yearly. The
conference will include representa-
tives of the employers and workers.
Each delegate may be accompanied by
three advisors and when women's
rights are involved at least one of
the advisors may be a woman.
The conference will meet at the seat
of the League of Nations where the
international labor office will be es-
tablished as part of the league organ-
ization.
Financial Commission Meets
Paris, March 31.-The first meeting
between the financial commission of
the conference and the German finan-
cial agents will take place at Com-
ptegne, Thursday, where an indefinite
session will be held to arrange the
exchaige of German securities for
food stuffs.
In addition to Compiegne, commit-
tees are also working at Cologne, for
the disposition of raw material, and
Rotterdam on arrangements concern-
ing shipment of food and at Sta con-
cerning the details of taking over Ger-
man shipping.
The committee at Rotterdam is the
one that looks after Belgian relief
work before the armistice was signed.
CHICAGO PROF. TO
TALK ON ALGEBRA
Prof. H.. 0. Rugg, of the University
of Chicago, will be the principal
speaker at the mathematical confer-
ence of the Schoolmasters' club con-
vention, which will be held at 2
o'clock Thursday, April 3, in the lec-
ture room of Tappan hall. His sub-
ject will be "Standardized Tests in
First Year Algebra."
"Should Algebra Be Taught Prior to
the Ninth Grade" is the subject of Mrs.
Edith J. Rauch, of Northwestern high
school, Detroit, who will also be a
speaker.
The speakers for the session to be
held at 2 o'clock Friday, April 4, at
the same place, will be Universitymen
and will include Prof. R. H. Curtiss on
the subject, "Navigation," Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw on "Ballistics," Major Peter
Field on "The Firing of a Large Cal-
ibre Gun," and Prof. W. B. Ford on
"Mathematics After the War."
Miss Sadie M. Alley, of Northwest-
ern high school, Detroit, is chairman
of the, conference, and Miss Mary
Louise Welton, of Ann Arbor, is secre-
tary.
CANOES AVAILABLE
FOR USE ON HURON
Although the private canoe shelters
are still being repaired, canoes are
available for hire, and quite a number
of students have taken advantage of
the fact to navigate the less turbulent

sections of the river.
The Huron is flowing more slowly
than is customary so early in the
year, which accounts for the unusual
number of enthusiasts that has been
seen on the river this spring. The
local canoe livery is open during the
day, but so far this season has been
closed at night.

DRESS REH 4ARSALS
START FOR PLAY
Costumes have been distributed, and
dress rehearsals have comnmened for
"The Much Woo'd Maiden," the Class-
ical club play to be given at 8:15
o'clock Thursday night in University
hall.
Saturday afternoon witnessed the
first of the dress rehearsals, anddthey
will. continue daily until the day of
the presentation. George D. Wilner,
grad., director of the play, and author
of the adaptation of Plautus' "Casina,"
which is being used, expressed himself
as well pleased with the progeress of
the players to date.
Tickets for the play have been plac-
ed on sale at the Busy Bee and in
University hall corridor. All seats
will be reserved for the performance,
and reservations must be made in
University hall before Thursday.
This play forms a part of the en-
tertainment provided for the School
Masters' convention which is in ses-
sion here this week.
Many Homeops in
Service Abroad
News of some of the Homeopathic
medical graduates who are overseas
has been received by Mrs. Hugh Hilde-
brand in letters from her husband,
Lieut. Hugh Hildebrand, '15H, who
is with the 19th motor command in
Brassenhien about five miles from
Coblenz.
Lieut. Clifford Mandeville, '17H, and
Lieut. Milton Darling, '13H, are with
the field hospital of the 2nd division
about five miles from Coblenz. Lieut.
Robert Criswell, '15H, is serving with
French hospital S. 0. S. near Paris.
Capt. Harry Hammel, '15H, has been
serving with the British for the past
two years.
Major Hugh Beebe, of the Homeopa-
thic faculty, and Capt. Roland, a for-
mer assistant of Dr. D. W. Myers, are
at the evacuation hospital No. 19 near
Trevais, France.
Lieut. Frank McMullen is reported
ill with pneumonia. Lieut. Robert
Ideson, '14, is with the 12 Aero Ob-
servation squadron. Capt. B. Falder,
'14H, is at evacuation No. 6 at Co-
blenz. Capt. A. B. Smith, former
Homeopathic faculty member, is also
in Coblenz.
MEET LIFE'S CALL
SAYS DR. DOUGLAS
"Every man receives his call in life,"
said the Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, speak-
ing before the Jewish Students' Con-
gregation Sunday evening at Lane
hall, "and it is up to him to hear that
call and be ready and not afraid to an-
swer it."
Thatthe main fault of today is the
failure of men to answer the call, be-
cause they fear to try new paths and
prefer to follow the line of least re-
sistance, was maintained by Dr. Dou-
glas.'
"A student comes to college and de-
cides to study medicine because his
grandfather has willed him a case of
instruments. He soon finds that his
interests lie in journalism. But he
is afraid to break away. The result
is that he becomes an indifferent doc-
tor, where he might have become a
good journalist."
Dr. Douglas believes that a man
should follow his inclinations, for he
can do best what he likes best. "An
engineer hears the call to become a
lawyer, but Is reluctant to leave his
end of the campus to come over to a
part of it with which he is not fa-
miliar. This is not as it should be.
If the call comes, obey it. It may
mean harder work, but it will pay
in the long run."
WARNER ADJUDGED
INSANE BY BOARD

Robert Warner, who last week shot
and killed' Irma Casler (Perkins) in a
little school house in Lodi township,
was Monday adjudged insane by a com-
mission of three physicians appointed
by Judge G. W. Sample. They recom-
mended that he be confined for an
indefinite period.
He is to be brought before Judge
Sample at 9 o'colck Tuesday morn-
ing for commitment to Ionia State
Hospital for the Insane. His father,
ERiram Warner of Jackson, was in Ann
Arbor Monday afternoon to ask that
his son be left in Washtenaw county
jail for a few days, to give his mother
a chance to come and see him before
he is sent away. It is expected that
the request will be granted.
The sanity commission reported that
Warner is suffering from the dementia
typ- of insanity. He is normal most
of tne time, but is subject to out-
breaks such as resulted in the death
of Irma Perkins. Investigation of his
life history showed signs of degen-
eracy. He was not regular in school
attendance, and has also been subject
to fits of abstraction.

MUTUAL SYMPATHY
AMONG NATIONS OF
LEAGUE NECESSARY
PROFESSOR VAN TYNE GIVES
VIEWS OF SITUATION BE.
FORE FOR X3I
IRELAND AND GERMANY
ARE AGAINST ENGLAND

British Navy is Given Large
For the Allied Vic.
tory

CreditI

That a League of Nations would not
succeed simply Vecause it had a cov-
enant, but that its strength would ex-
ist rather in antunderstanding between
t he various nations composing it, and
an appreciation of each other, with
this particularly true of England' and
and the United States, was the opinion
expressed by Prof C. -. Van Tyne, of
the history department in a talk be-
fore the student forum Sunday night
in Lane hall on "The Relation Be-
tween England and the United States."
With this statement as a basis for
his talk Professor Van Tyne reviewed
the work of the British during the
great war, declaring that the empire's
navy had been responsible in a large
measure for the Allied victory. He
cited its work in th convoyance of
26,000,000 troops, a feat for which it is
giver little credit by the American
public, but which is not overlooked by
Admiral Sims of the American navy.
Turning to the Irish situation, Pro-
fessor Van Tyne asserted that the in-
formation on which many people in
this country based their judgments
was obtained from the Irish who had
come to this country a number of
years ago, when conditions were far
different in their homeland. He said
that in reality the Irish had greater
representation per unit of population
in Parliament than England.
"The United States must either side
with England, in perfect understand-
ing, or side with Ireland and Germany
against England," he continued.
Professor Van Tyne offered the op-
inion that thetone reason why the
Sammie and the Tommy had never
Leen on an extremely friendly footing
was that the tvo were so nearly alike
in all respects that neither could un-
derstand why they were not exactly
alike.
MICHIGAN TEACHERS
TALK AT BANQUET
Michigan schoolmen were given the
opportunity of hearing the opinions of
the state leaders in their chosen voca-
tion at the banquet of the Michigan
State Teachers' association, held Mon-
day evening at the Union.
Discussions of special interest to
those planning to enter the teaching
profession were given by the super-
intendents of the high schools at Hills-
dale, Saginaw, Flint, Kalamazoo, Pon-
tiac and Muskegon, and the assistant
principal of the Cass Technical high
school of Detroit.
The all-year school and its advant-
ages in the teaching of agriculture, in-
dustry and the commercial subjects
discussed.
The meetings of the association will
be continued Tuesday, at 9 o'clock in
the morning, 2 o'clock in the afternoon
and 7:30 in the evening in room B of
the Law building. Discussions will
be held on the social foundations of
the vocational education, the training
of the gifted child, effective studying,
credit for outside Bible study, and
the social importance of training for
recreation.
The Tuesday evening meeting will
mark the close of the association's
annual meeting.
GRAND RAPIDS MEN TO BOOST
OPERA IN THEIR HOME TOWN
Working in connection with the
Alumni of their home city, the Grand
Rapids club has secured the ball room
of the Pantlind hotel for a dance to
be given after the production of the
Opera in that city.
In past years the production of ,the
Opera in the Furniture City has met
with marked success due to the loyal
boosting. on the part of the students
and alumni, a packed house witness-
ing every performance.
To perfect still more elaborate plans
a special meeting of the club, and
all Grand Rapids men'has been call-
ed to take place at 7:15 o'clock Tues-
day evening in Lane hall.
International Tennis Meet for Allies
For the first time since the war
started an international tennis tour-
nament will be held this June. There

are a great many of the pre-war stars
from all countries, except Germany
and her allies, entered for the cham-
pionship. Only men from the allied
countries will be eligible.

OLD GRADS OF '69
RETURN IN JUNE
Sixteen members of the class of
1869 expect to return to the campus
in June for the semi-centennial re-
unidn of the class, according to word
received by the alumni secretary.
Mr. Dewey, the present class secre-
tary, reports that out of the 96 that
entered the class in 1865, 44 gradu-
ated in 1869, 24 have died, and 20 are
living.
"A large proportion of the original
class were farmers' sons," declares
Mr. Dewey. "So far as I am informed
not one of them followed in the foot-
steps of his father. Ten took up teach-
ing but only two remained in it, as a
life profession. Business, law, and the
ministry absorbed the rest.
"It is more than likely that this
will be the last quinquennial meet-'
ing of the class since, of course, all
are beyond three score and ten, and
some have reached the four score
mark.
"Prompt replies have been received
from all remaining members, evinc-
ing a lively class spirit and leaving no
doubt that all will come who can."
Contest Run Bly
Sunday Schools
Three prizes amounting to $2,000
will be given by the American Sun-
day School union for book manu-
scripts dealing with important ques-
tions of the day and yet possessing
permanent value.
The first prize of $1,000 for the
best book manuscript on the subject,
"Christianity and Modern Industry."
The book should treat with the appli-
ance of Christian principles to the re-
lations of employer, employe, and con-
sumer. It should include actual
achievements, and the rural as well
as the urban situation.
A prize of $1,000, in two parts, $600
for the best and $400 for the next
best, will be given for the books on
the subject, "Everyday Heroism." This
work should have special application
and appeal to young people, and should
emphasize present-day calls to com-
munity service, and world-wide broth-
erhood.
Contestants may choose any method
of treatment they wish. The length is
limited from 40,000 to 70,000 words.
Further information may be secured
at President Harry B. Hutchins' of-
fice or by writing to the American
Sunday School Union, 1816 Chestnut
street, Philadelhia, Pa.
."
TO SEE PLAY, DAD
MUST FACE POLICE
Fathers of fair young maidens are
generally pitied about Easter-time
every year for reasons which the mo-
diste knows and won't tell, and the
father knows and don't dare tell.
But this year it's different. Fathers
of girls taking part in the Junior
Girls' play are most envied of men
this spring. Why? To tell you will
enlist you in the ranks of the envious
ones..
Those fathers who have daughters
taking part in the play may attend
and those who cannot claim that dis-
tinction may stay at home. The only
men not coming under the first cate-
gory who will also be allowed to see
the play are those who will compose
the orchestra.
Considerable red tape must be fol-
lowed, however, before the privileged
fathers may enter the theater on
Wednesday night. Consent must be
gained from the dean of women and
the ticket specially stamped by Miss
Louise Potter and then presented for
inspection to a police officer who will
stand at the theater entrance. Facul-
ty men will not be allowed to attend.
Colored posters that ar mysterious
in nature have been placed in various

campus buildings to excite the divini-
tive powers of people interested in the
play. Practically all seats in the foyer
and first balcony have already been re-
served. Those not having reserva-
tions will be compelled to take seats
in the second balcony. A dress re-
hearsal was held in the Whitney thea-
ter last evening.
CHICAGO ORCHESTRA PLAYS
COMPOSITION OF ALUMNUS
Mr. R. G. Cole, '88, professor of
music of the Columbia university
summer session, was the composer of
an overture on a recent program of
the Chicago Symphony orchestra.
Mr. Cole was educated in the public
schools of Ann Arbor and later was
graduated from the University. His
musical education was obtained large-
ly from courses in theoretical music
elected during his college course and
two years of study in Berlin. He has
been director in schools of music in
several of the larger universities of
the country.

FOCH, TO ORDER GENERAL ADVANCE
OF ALLIED ARMIES IF GERMANY'S
DEPUTIES FAIL. TO SIGN TREATY

SHIPBUILDERS DROWNED
Bristol, Pa., March 31.- A
number of persons, reportsrang-
Iing from 10 to 40, were drown-
ed today when a scaffold of the
Merchants' Shipbuilding com-
pany here collapsed during the
launching of a freighter. Two
bodies have been recovered.
About 150 persons, including
workmen and spectators, were
on the scaffold and many of
them were thrown into the
Delawarerriver when the struc-
ture went down.

FOREIGN OFFICE DECIDES TO ACT
IN ACCORDANCE WITH 14
POINTS
BUDAPEST TRIES HARD
TO APPEAR OR DERLY
Freedom for Only Those Who Are
Willing to Live as Government
Dictates

80BCHE PHOES EASY
ITIM -COL SMITH
GERMAN AMERICANS PROVEDt
THEMSELVES HEROES s
IN FIGHTINGd
"The only square thing about thea
German," said Col. Dan Morgan Smith
of the famous battalion of death, in
his talk last night at the Presbyterian'
church, "the only square thing about
the German is the shape of his head."t
Colonel Smith commanded the bat-t
talion of death when it straightened
out the bow-shaped St. Mihiel sector, i
a feat which General Foch had declal-t
ed impossible.
"The German is neither practical,
brave, philosophic nor good. America
has forgotten more than Germany ever 2
knew.
Germans Were Inefficient v
"German efficiency may be illustrat-
ed by the way in which they carry onP
warfare. When a German battery has
240 shells to distribute over four sec-n
tors, the German mind works in the t
following way: 240 shells, four sec-v
tors, making 60 shells to a sector.
There are 60 minutes in an hour.
Very good. We will fire one shell ac
minute. We will begin firing on oneb
sector at 1 o'clock, fire 60 shells uponn
It at an interval of one minute eachP
for exactly one hour. At 2 o'clock wev
will begin firing on sector number two,
and so on.a
"As a result of this German methode
the Americans in sector one go into
deep dugouts at one minute to 1 andI
remain there in safety until 2 o'clock.P
At 2 o'clock the doughboys in sector
two retire until 3 o'clock, and so itd
goes on.1
"The inefficient American mind,c
however, takes 240 shells and fires nowa
in one sector, now in another at ir-
regular intervals so that the Germans1
are in continual fear from start to0
finish.n
Battalion Meant Deathv
"The battalion of death," said Col-r
onel Smith, "was not so called becausea
so many of its men were killed. Itv
was called the battalion of death be-s
cause it was the cause of so manyt
(Continued on Page Six) s
ENGINEERS DEBATE
AT A. S. E. MEETINGf
Whether or not the metric systemf
of measures and weights should bet
adopted in the United States was thet
question debated upon by four mem- h
bers of thie American Society of Eng-
ineers at the meeting of the Univer-a
sity of Michigan student branch Mon-s
day evening in the Engineering build-
ing. No decision was awarded andN
each of the contestants received the ]
same amount of applause as the de-F
bate was held more for the purpose
of enabling engineers to express them-S
selves before an audience.
After the debate Prof. H. C. Ander-
son talked on "The Value of a Dollar."
With a number of charts and graphsp
Professor Anderson explained why theG
income of many corporations has dim-n
inished so noticeably since 1910. "Aa
landlord can adjust himself to rising e
prices," he said, "by merely raising his
rents. The railroads are confronted
with quite another proposition-their
rates are fixed by law. The railroads
and other institutions like them are
having considerable trouble these days
in financing their up-keep as well as
to 'pay dividends'."
The debate and the discussion aft-
erward were so satisfactory that plans'
are being made for the introduction
of another question at the next month-I
ly meeting of the society.
Student 'Council to Meet Tonight
The Student Council will meet at 7
o'clock Tuesday night at the old Union
building.

(By Associated Press)
London, March 31. - The Evening
News says it understands that reliable
information has been received in Lon-
don that in case the German delegates
refuse to sign the peace treaty, Mar-
shal Foch has the authority to order
the general advance of the allied arm-
ies along the Rhine.
Germans Stick to 14 Points
The department of the German for-
eign office having charge of the peace
negotiations has reached a decision as
to its attitude toward the negotiations,
says a German wireless message. The
department has decided the German
government should act only in accord-
ance with President Wilson's 14 points.
Budapest Outwardly Quiet
Budapest, March 31.-The plunge -of
Budapest into anti-capitalism contin-
ues with feverish efforts to show that
the reign of law and order is undis-
turbedq
The city is outwardly quiet since the
first few days in which there was much
looting, especially of jewelry shops.
As a result of the looting 150 persons
were executed by the new regime,
their communistic ideas apparently be-
ing too violent.
The new freedom exists for those
who are willing to live as the govern-
ment dictates. Two important news-
papers, the Pester Lloyd, and the
Azest, print only what the censor per-
mits. Foreign correspondents may
transmit by telegraph if they write
what is desired by the government.
Czechs Take Kascbau
Czechs who have been fighting the
communists in the southern Slovaka
have captured the city of Kaschau, 140
miles northwest of Budapest and other
points. The German colonists in
western Hungary and Transalvana
are hostile to the communists and are
attempting to establish their Independ-
ence.
French troops at Szgeedin, southern
Hungary and elsewhere it is said are
permitting the communists to estab-
lish themselves in control as they wish
despite the fact that there were riots
in small industrial centers where the
communists held organized parades
after the fashion in Budapest.
Those entering the country may
leave only by the personal permission
of Bela Kun, foreign minister. The
minister has acknowledged in an inter-
view that Hungary's commune does
not desire to make war on the Entente
at present, but asserts that Hungary'
wishes to live peacefully with all. He
says: "Our only object is to protect
the common people and defend their
soil and also the industries, which are
the property of the proletariat."
Women Join Red Army
Bela Kun makes no secret of the
fact that he has merely used the last
argument possibly against the En-
tente saying: "While the other coun-
tries of the former empire have been
threatening with Bolshevism if their
wishes were not consulted we merely
had the courage to take this final step."
The Hungarians declare that their
action is guaranteed by President Wil-
son's 14 points and that their ideas
of personal libertyare embodied in the
American declaration of independence,
Women are joining the red army. Bela
Kun has installed his offices in the.
Royal Castle.
SENIOR LITS MUST PROCURE
CAPS AND GOWNS THIS WEEK
Senior lit students are requested to
procure their caps and gowns at
George Moe's this week by the chair-
man of the committee in charge of
arranging for the seniors' graduating
exercises.
DATE OF PLAY CHANGED
"Nos Intimes," the Cercle I
Francais play will be presented C
May 1, instead of April 26, the
date formerly set. The play will I
be given at 8 o'clock in Sarah I
Caswell Angell hall. Rehearsals }

for the play, are being held in
the Cercle Francais room, and
commendable progress is being
attained.
I- E

INDEPENDENTS NOTE!
Few Independents have been
sending in the number of their
booths with t'ie lists of their
girls for the J-Hop. Booth num-
bers are important if the names
are to appear in the J-Hop ex-
tra. Due to the fac that so few
have sent complete information,
Independents should send in
to The Daily office lists of thei
girls together with their booth
numbers not later than 5 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon.

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