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March 30, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TflfE MTCHTOAN DAILY

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first nine started the comeback with a
single. A base on balls, another hit
by Huber and an error by Froenke
allowed the three necessary tallies to
be made.
Huber Worked Well
Although still slightly rough in
spots the two teams looked nearly as
Teams Worked Smoothly Throughout good as did the 1918 title winners. Hu-
Whole of Niue In- s ber catching handled the ball in ex-
nings cellent shape and did some good
____s throwing to second. He looks as
though he would fill the hole left by
PROSPECTS LOOK GOOD YOR Morrison nearly as well as the big
ANOTHER WINNING VARSITY fellow could himself.
Coach Lundgren used practically all
In a practice game of baseball Sat- of his pitchers, starting Kimball on

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urday, afternoon between two teams
chosen by Coach Lundgren, the regu-
lars defeated the -seconds, by putting
three runs across the plate in the last
inning, overcoming the 3 to 1' lead}
that the seconds had acquired earlier
in the struggle and winning 4 to 3.
None of the hard fought Conference
games of last spring were more hotly,
contested nor were their endings any
more exciting than was this first meet-
ing of the men that are attempting to
make the Wolverine's diamond aggre-
gation this season.
Pheney playing right field for the

the mound for the regulars and
Shiedler fot the seconds. In the fourth
inning these two r were relieved by
Glenn and Parks, and in the seventh,
Kemp and Crocket were sent in.
Kimball Wild
Kimball was slightly wild although
he gave only one pass. Schiedler
worked. in his usual easy fashion and
showed the same control that won him
several crucial victories last year.
Glenn, too, worked well. His arm,
which was injured last season, seems
to be strong and he was using his
cross-fire delivery effectively.

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What hat are you going to wear for
J-Hop?
The Dobb's or Youngs
Silk Top Hat
They are the young man's most ap-
proved Dress Hat.

Parks, advertised as the Ruzicka of
the present spring, lived up to expec-
tations. Using a mixture of fast ones
and curves he continually had the
regulars fanning the air. Parks ap-
peared as though he would take up
the major part of this season's work
and handle it as well as will, be nec-
ess axv.
Ofthe last two twirlers, Kemp
looked the better. He had a good
variety of curves but was rather wild.
Infields Smooth
The infields were both working un-
usually smoothly. They looked as
though they had already been through
half a season, and few errors, snappy
throwing, and clever fielding showed
that this year's first defense will be
as good as was the famous Adams,
Garrett, Mraz, and Knode combina-
tion of 1918.
In the outfield the men working on
both sides handled every chance given
them. Although there were no hits
that took the gardners far out-of their
stations, the several that were allow-
ed to each were caught without a
slip.
Coach Lundgren is particularly for-
tunate in having an abundance of in-
field material. He will have a com-
plete second four that will be nearly
as good as the Varsity's own.
The game was played on the reg-
ular diamond, which was still a little
soft, but nevertheless in good shape.
Lineups-Regulars, Knode 2b, Coop-
er c. f., Bowerman 1. f, Pheney, r. f.,
Van Boven s. s., Garrett 3b, Huber c,
Adams lb, Kimball p, Glenn p, Crock-
et p; seconds, Johns 1. f., Froemke
2b, Anderson s. s., Karpus 3b, Novak
ib, Landenhan c. f., Schluntz c, Ry-
chener r. f., Hall r. f., Schiedler p,
Parks p, Lemp p.
CHIAN ENTEED I
MASS ATHLETIC MEET
PURPOSE IS TO ALLOW MORE
MElN TO COMPETE IN
SPORT
Rules governing the annual Con-
ference intercollegiate track and field
games, known as the Mass Athletic
meet, have been received by Coach
Farrell following a meeting of Big
Ten athletic directors held in Patten
gymn asi um at Northwestern on March
21.
hoIding as its object the broaden-
ing in scope of intercollegiate com-
petition to include the great majority
of university students, the meets are
to be decided through the totals scor-
ed by the mass of athletes at each in-
stitution and not by the individual
brilliancy of the few.
Meet Held Each Spring
Present arrangements provide for
a meet of this sort to be held in the
spring of every year on the home
grounds of each university or college.
It is stated that all events must be
completed within a definite period of
eight days, including two Saturdays.
SThe period selected for the 1919 games
is that of May 17 to May 24 inclusive.
Eligibility is limited to students
and members of the faculty who have
not received a college letter in any
sport. There is no limit to the num-
ber of entriesthatmay compete.
An all-round contest and an indi-

vidual event contest will form two
separate portions of the meet. The
all-round standing of a university or
college will be determined by the to-
tals of 200 men who have been enter-
ed in all of the following five events:
high jump, shot put, 50 yard low hur-
dIes, 100 yard dash, and broad jump.
200 Men to Decide Points
The individual rating of colleges
will be decided by the total of the
best 200 men in each of the above
events. A 32 man relay team to cov-
er a distance of two miles will be
held as an independent event and
scored by total time. Each runner
will carry the baton 110 yards.
The plan is in direct accord with
the present movement to offer ath-
letics and particularly intercollegiate
sports to a larger number of college
students. In the past intramural
games have been forced to serve this
purpose in full and in many institu-
tions they have not proved the suc-
cess that has been recordedat Mich-
igan.
"This year will see Michigan'listed
in the first intercollegiate of this sort
and as the very nature of the games
demand a thorough representation, the
support of the plan will decide wheth-
er or not the movement is to get the
expected permanent approval of the
student body.
Use the Dany to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
oorning.-Adv.
MARKS AND DAVIS'

made of Whole Milk,

Malted Milk, Ice Cream and

your Favorite Flavor.

PHONE 1300
for your taxi for the J-Hop. To insure
best service orders should be placed at
once. Our cars are first class and our
service the most dependable. Ann Ar-
bor Taxi Co.-Adv.

WARNING! Don't lose your m
making poorinvestments. Invest
Huron Valley Bldg. & Sav. Asso.
solutely safe. Pays 6 percent. M,
loaned on Real Estate. H. H. He
Secretary, Savings Bank Bldg.-

A MALTED MILK

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tA
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STEAM TABLES with

DIAGRAMS

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Phone 13

Successor to SHEEHAN & COMPANY

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Remember if your Dress Suit does
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Tinker & Company
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