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March 30, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOUDY; PROBABLY
RAIN OR SNOW

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNI)AY, MARCH 30, 1919.

VOL. XXIX. No. 128.

PRICE THREE CEN'

LAST PRODUCTION
OF OPERA ROUNDS
OUT ITS SUCCESS

COORDINATION OF ACTING
SCENERY IS NOTABLE
FEATURE

AND

MATT TOWAR IS HIT
IN ROLE OF PROFESSOR

LAST TICKETS FOR
BANQUET ON SALE
Five hundred tickets have already
been sold for the fifteenth Women's
annual banquet to be given at 5:30
o'clock Wednesday afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium. A few more tickets
will be''sold between 8 and 12 o'clock
tomorrow morning in University hall.
After that it will be impossible for
undergraduates to secure a place at
the banquet.
Extensive plans are being made to
insure the success of the affair.
Among the principal speakers will be
Dean Myra B. Jordan, Dean John R.
Effinger, Mildred Hinsdale, '95, Olga
Shinkman, '17, and Ruth Dailey, '19.
The program .following the banquet
will end at about 7 o'clock and the
D. U. R. has arranged to convey the
banqueters to the Junior Girls' play
in four special interurban cars, spec-
ially used for the occasion.
FIVE CONVENTION S ON
SCHEDULE FOR SEEK

KE"ITH CRIDE S TEIL,'20,,
TFAKE LEAD)S

MEMER OCAST
CHOSEN FOR PLAY
OF LSISCLUB

AD I

Read This And Take Unto Yourself
The Mloral, ""Don't Be Behind Time"

Opera Granted to be One of
Successful in Last Few
Years

31ost

(By S. S. Attwold)
Entering into the spirit of "Come
On, Dad" from start to finish, th cast
and chorus wound up the last night
of the opera with a well rounded per-
formance that won merited applause
from an appreciative house.
The scenery, artistically designed
and well arranged was excellently
suited td make an appropriate and
bright background for the costumes.
This year's opera made a special ap-
peal to the eye, pleasing costumes,
gay with colors, brilliant but not
clashing, put the audience in a mood
receptive to the offerings of the play-
ers.
It is hardly to be expected that any
deep laid plot would be found in a
,production of this character. In
former operas the weakness of the plot
was one of the strongest criticisms.
"Come On, Dad" displayed coordin-
ation of the action and songs in a
measure to warrant commendation.
The three acts increased in action
'and in the enthusiasm of the cast and
chorus from the opening chorus to the
climax in the finale. The close of the
second act produced the best piece of
music for the entire company.
Mat Towar, as the eccentric and ego-
tistic old professor, will be longest re-
membered for his creation of a char-
acter, laughable and quite original in
Michigan Union operas. Paul Moore
sings "Marry Me, Mary" to an at-
-tractive heroine, Paul Wilson.
This song is one of the opera's best
but it was rendered with a lack of
warmth hardly consistent with such
an important occasion in a young
man's life. Could Mary have put a
little .more volume and a little less
disguise in her voice, she would have
been even more attractive.
It is on Knight Mirrielees as Tom
Broadhead, Jr., that the opera depends
for the punch that makes it "get
across." He brings the whole to the
climax in a manner appreciated by
the audience, who called him and his
sattelites, the chorus, back time after
time.
The awkwardness of the chorus adds
a masculine touch to the dancing that
amuses the audience,,waiting for some
catastrophe to occur among the "Ro-
mance Boys and Girls." The audi-
ence was, fortunately, disappointed.
As operas are presented in the fu-
ture, those now on the campus will
look back on "Come On, Dad" as a
success, and will point to "Marry Me,
Mary," "My Lover," sung by the quar-
tet: Wilson, Waltzer, Nash and
Kempf, as the two hits of this opera.
Though "Come On, Dad' can boast
no music of the lasting quality exem-
plified in "Men of the Maize and Blue,"
and "The Old Town Canoe," it will be
remembered as an opera well rounded
in all parts--singing, dancing, scenic
effects and orchestration.
The campus called for a come back
opera and "dad" came.
MERCHANTS TO CUT
ADS IN PROGRAMS
More than 60 leading Ann Arbor
merchants have signed a petition in-
itiated by The Daily, to abstain from
advertising in programs, year books,
souvenir pamphlets, handbooks, and
all other publications associated with
therUniversity not authorized by the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions. The signatures of the remain-
ing merchants will be solicited soon.
In a number of middle western un-
iversity towns, the solicitation of ad-
vertising for any university publica-
tion is not allowed unless sanction-
ed by faculty officials. This method
is followed to prevent merchants from
being coerced to take advertising
space in publications which will not
benefit them.
The method to be installed here will
necessitate all individuals .contem-
plating the selling of advertising in
any University publication, to first
submit their plans to the Board in
Control, which shall judge its worth,
and either outrule it as an advertis-
ing medium, or determine the amount
of advertising space to be sold and the

rates to be charged.
In the future students soliciting ad-
vertising for publications which have
been favorably passed upon, will have
rate cards bearing the printed en-
dorsement of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.

MORE TRAN 1000 PEOPLE
IN CITY FOR MEET-
INGS

TO BEI

One of the most active weeks of the
school year will be ushered in Mon-
day, when five educational conventions
will meet here. More than 1,000 peo-
ple will be in the city during the five
days of meetings and lectures.
The association of city superintend-
ents and school boards will head the
week's program with a banquet and
addresses at the Union Monday night.
Tuesday will be the opening day for
the Schoolmaster's club, the Short
Term institute, -Classical convention
and the Michigan Academy of Science.
Schoolmasters' Club Meets
The Schoolmasters' club is meeting
this year for the fifty-fourth time. It
will be the leading organization con-
vening here.
Dr. Henry Suzzallo, president of the
University of Washington, who is
prominent in university circles will
speak on "Social Changes Affecting
Secondary Education," at 10 o'clock
Thursday, April 3, in the N. S. audi-
torium.
Prof. Guy M. Whipple, one of the
country's leading psychologists, will
address the Short Term institute on
"How the Psychologist Measures In-
telligence," at 11 o'clock Thursday
morning, April 3, in the N. S. audi-
torium.
The Classical conference is bringing
Prof. Charles Upson Clark of the
American Academy in Rome to speak
April 2 in Hill auditorium on "Italy
in the War and After the War." He
wil show. official motion pictures from
the Italian government.
Local Men to Speak
Many of the speakers fortthese con-
ventions will be members of the Uni-
versity, local high school faculties,
and several outside professors and ed-
ucators.
Luncheons, banquets and theatricals
are planned for the guests. The Ju-
nior Girls' play, "The Much Woo'd
Maiden," given by the Classical club,
and a gymnasium demonstration are
scheduled for next week.
DETROIT SINGERS
TO APPEAR MONDAY
Detroit musicians of talent will give
a concert under the auspices of the
Phoebe Beal Circle of King's Daugh-
ters at 8 o'clock Monday evening in
the High School auditorium.
The J. L. Hudson Co. Ladies' quar-
tet composed of Miss Isabel Hunt, Mrs.
C. 0. Brown, Miss Nornia Shilling,
and Mrs. Laura Van Dusen, will be
assisted by Mr. Grayling King, violin-
ist, and Mr. Thomas Wade Lane,
basso.
Mr. King is the concert master of
the Detroit symphony orchestra, and
is claimed to be one of America's great
virtuosos.
Mr. Lane has been a soloist at the
Euclid Avenue Presbyterian church
and for-four years has sung on Chau-
tauqua and Lyceum Bureaus.
Mrs. Thos. Wade Lane and Miss
Margaret Mannebach will be the ac-
companists.
STUDENTS GET ICY BATH IN
FIRST ACCIDENT OF YEAR
Spring seems to be here for what is
believed to be the first accident on the
Huron this year happened Saturday
afternoon when a canoe bearing two
arduous sailors of misfortune over-
turned underneath the railroad bridge.
Chester C. Chopp, '20, and Wallace
E. Cake, '10, were the persons to re-
ceive the chilly bath. Both have fully
recovered from iWe effects of their ex-
perience. According to Cake the canoe
was unexpectedly caught b- the swift
current under the bridge and could
not be ianaged.

MANY VETERANS IN THEa
"MUCH WOOED MAIDEN"
Play Characterlwed by a Large Num.i-
her of Interesting Minor
Parts
Leading roles in "The Much Woo'd
Maiden," to be presented at 8:15 o'clock
Thursday night, April 3, in University
hall, will be filled largely by students
who have appeared previously in cam-
pus productions.
Playing as Cleostrata is Elizabeth
B. Oakes, '20. Among other players
to take part in this year's play who
have proved their talent in other work
with the Classical club are W. Keith
Chidester, '20, who will support Miss
Oakes in the role of Lysidamus; Al-
bert Jacobs, '21, and Geraldine Brasie,
'21. These three were members of the
cast of "Phormio."
Victor Brock, '19, and Charles Wil-
ner, '20, who appeared in "Menaech-
mae," the original Classical club pro-
duction, will again be seen before the
footlights. Brock also participated in
"Iphigenia," and in last year's Cercle
Francais play.
E'linor Chamberlain, '22, W. Messin-
ger, '20, Irene Crabb, '19, Marjorie
Deam, '22, R. S. Tubb', '21, Gladys
Turnbull, '22, Adelaide Adams, '20,
Josephine Waldo, '21, Sarah Caughey,
'19, and Madge Perrine, '20, constitute
the remainderof the cast.
LYMAN BRYSON IS
RED CROSS WORKER
Lyman L. Bryson, '10, formerly as-
sistant professor of journalism, has
been- chosen by tihe Red Cross maga-
zine to make an extensive trip through
Europe as their representative. Mr.
Bryson will sail from New York on
April 9.
During his trill he will visit prac-
tically all of Europe. Among the coun-
tries to which he will go will be Eng-
land, France, Italy, Serbia, Roumania,
Bulgaria, Macedonia, Russia, Greece,
Albania, and Palestine.
Mr. Bryson received both of his de-
grees from Michigan, the A.B. in 1910
and the A.M. in 1915. During the
years between 1913 and 1917 he was
instructor and assistant professor of
rhetoric and journalism. He was al-
so a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sig-
ma Delta Chi, and the Quadrangle
club.

(By Chow Chow)
The Sorority Snake strode statues-
quely through the arabesqued arch of
the Vampa Pi sorority house. As he
doffed his Borsalino his symmetrically
parted locks glistened lustrously
'neath the gently glowing chandeliers
of the drawing room mazdas. His
bow-shaped mouth bore a smile as he
thought of the pleasant evening in
store for him. For at 8 o'clock he was
to bear away Cleo Mahoney, Vampa
Pi's most pulchritudinous charmer, for
a period of unrestrained, diversion at
the Maj!
From the pocket of his chamois
skin vest he drew forth a mahogany-
plated Gruen Verithin which told him
that the hour of his conquest had ar-
rived. Eight o'clock, said the Swiss
watch which was made in Cincinnati.
Mrs. Seeall, the house chaperon,
had gone to notify Cleo of his arrival,
and soon he would hear her Dorothy
Dodd encased feet pattering down the
polished stairway. Several minutes
passed and then-a subtle fragrance
attacked the Grecian nostrils of the
Sorority Snake. But it was not the
exotic perfume of Cleo's Djer Kiss;
rather it savored of Brazalian coffee.
Suspense!
The chaperon, whose arrival had
been heralded by the odors of her cof-

Sorority Snake uncoiled himself from
the Grand Rapids divan and gave her
a questioning look.
"Miss Mahoney left word that she
went out 30 minutes after you were
due to arrive," spake she in funeral
tones.
"But it is only 8 o'clock now," ans-
wered the S. S., again cgnsulting his
watch.
"My dear sir, you have evidently
forgotten to set your watch ahead. By
the Big Ben on the mantelpiece you
will note that it is 9 o'clock," said
Mrs. Seeall with an air of finality,
pity, and sang froid. "You must not
have seen this morning's Daily."
She hafmded him the issue of Sunday
morning, and he read:
E j
On Sunday morning, March
30, 1919, in accordance with the
I act of Congress, the city and
I University clocks will be set one
hour ahead, and the University
exercises will be held on this
accelerated time for the rest of
the college year.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
REGISTRAR.

fee stained shirtwafst, entered.

The

BILLS PROVIDING FOR APPROPRIATION
OF S1,90O,0OO FOR UNIVERSITY NOW
IN HANDS Of MIC IGLEISLATURE

GRAND RAPIDS MEN
OPERA IN THEIR

TO BOOST
HOME TOWN1

Grand Rapids men will meet at 7:15
o'clock Tuesday evening in Lane hall
to discuss plans for boosting the
Opera in their home city. In past
years productions in that city have
played before packed houses due to
the organized campaign of the Michi-
gan men in their local high schools.
Plans will also be discussed for a
dance following the Opera.
LLOYD DOUGLAS TO ADDRESS
JEWISH STUDENTS TONIGHT
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, of the Con-
gregational church, will deliver the
sermon at the weekly service of the
Jewish Students' congregation in Lane
hall at 6:45 Sunday evening.

THE REV. R. S. CHALMERS, OF
TOLEDO, WHO SPEAKS TODAY
AT ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH.
.Expert On Holy
Land To Speak
Dr. Albert T. Clay, professor of As-
syriology and Babylonian literature at
Yale university, and a well-known
American scholar in the Semitic field,
will give two lectures this _ week in
Alumni Memorial hall.
The general subject of his talks will
be "Research in Bible ' Lands." The
first lecture will be held at 8 o'clock
Tuesday evening and will cover the
more recent discoveries; the second,
at 4:15 o'clock Wednesday afternoon,
will treat the empire of the Amorites.
These lectures are given in connec-
tion with the meeting of the Michi-
gan Schoolmasters' club, and are free
to all people of the University or the
town.

SALARIES OF INSTRUCTORS MAY
BE INCREASED BY
BILLS
$1,000,000 IN BILL F O R
ERECTION OF HOSPITAL
President Hutchins introduces Bills
in Person Before Meetings
of Legislature
Bills amounting to $1,900,000 for spe-
cial appropriations to the University
were reported out by the ways and
means committee of the house at Lan-
sing, states a dispatch to President
Harry B. Hutchins yesterday from the
capital city.
Salary Raise Provided
The bills as they will now be sub-
mitted to the house provide for the
following: $200,000 to complete and
equip the new library; $300,000 to
meet a deficiency for the year ending
Dec. 31, 1918; $700,000 to construct and
equip a new hospital; and $350,000 for
maintenance (additions to salaries)
for each of the next two fiscal years.
Would Give Hospital
This means that the University will
receive a new $1,015,000 hospital pro-
viding the above $700,000 appropria-
tion goes through the two houses. The
additional $315,000 comes from an ap-
propriation made in 1917 of $350,000,
of which only $35,000 has already been
used for the erection and furnishing
of a children's ward at the University
Homoeopathic hospital.
So as to be able to raise the sala-
ries of the instructing force of the
University to a living basis, a bill pro-
viding for $700,000, half of which is
to be used for each Hof the next two
fiscal years, was reported out by the
committee. This appropriation re-
places the request iade by the Uni-
versity for an increase in the mill tax
from three-eighths to one-half.
Provision for Library
For the completion of the construc-
tion of the University library building
and for equipping and furnishing the
same, a bill amounting to $200,000 is
also now submitted to the two houses.
The $300,000 appropriation asked,
by the University to meet a deficiency
in the current year ending Dec. 31,
1918, was likewise passed by the com-
mittee without modifications. The re-
duced income from student fees and
the increased' cost in everything that
the University must purchase have
caused this deficit.
President Makes Plan
Overlooking the failure of the model
school bill, the University authorities
are well pleased with the action taken
by the ways and means committee.
Although the final grants may be al-
tered, it is not believed that the re-
quests as they now are drawn up will
be cut. The committee will now sub-
mit the bills to the house and if they
pass there, the senate will then take
them up.
President Hutchins introduced at
the beginning of his regime the plan
of going in person to the state legis-
latur~e very two years and asking for
special appropriations for the Univer-
sity. Of every request made, he has
secured special grants.

STUDENT AFFIR
COMMITTEE GIVES
RULESFOR 1-HOP,
REGULATIONS FOR FRATERNITY
HOUSE-PARTIES MADE
PUBLIC
FLOWERS PROHIBITED;
NONE IN DECORATIONS
Flowers if Worn in Corsages Should
Be Checked at the Door of
Gymnasium
After entrusting the care and suc-
cess of the 1920 J-Hop to the commtit-
tee, the committee on student affairs
laid down the following rules:
First you will remember the Hop
was reinstated in 1914 in response to
the request from the presidents of the
several Junior classes. The petition
containing this request contained
rules which were adopted by the Uni-
versity Senate, ad should, therefore,
be considered binding.
Second, the control of the lighting
at the Hop should not be delegated to
the orchestra leaders but should be
kept in the hands of the Junior Hop
committee. There should be no "dark'
dances."
Third, in accordance with the rules
of the Board of Regents dancing must
cease at-3 a. m. and the lights be out
by 3:30 a. m.
You are requested to transmit the
following instructions to groups and
organizations conducting house par-
ties.
First, house parties shall commence
not earlier than Friday morning and
end not later than Sunday afternoon.
Second, the selection of chaperons
for house parties is left in the hands
of the group concerned, but the chap-
erones should be definitely informed of
the wishes of the University in the
following matters:
1. There should be no dancing at
the house after the Hop. After a
reasonable time for refreshments and
rest the party should break up.
2. Dances or other festivities on.
Saturday night should end promptly at
midnight.
Flowers are to be prohibited at the
Hop this year, and all those who wear
them will have their corsages checked
at the door. \ Fraternities are asked
by the Hop committee to refrain from
decorating their booths with flowers
or other luxuries which may well be
done with'out.
Contrary to the report Saturday, the
fraternities will not be required to
decorate their booths, but will only
have to furnish the furniture.
PROGRAM OFFERED
BY MUSIC FACULTY
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel P. Lockwood
will open the program of the Twilight
Faculty concert given by the Univer-
sity School of Music at 3 o'clock Sun-
day in Hill auditorium with Kotek's
Dubs, Op. 5, in three parts; the Fugh-
etta, Polonaise, and Duo d' Amour.
The following program will be of-
fered, to which the general public is
invited:
Duos, Op. 5 ................Otek
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Lockwood
Arioso "Salutation of the Dawn"
.... ...............Stevenson
Nora Crane Hunt
Violin Obligato' by Bertram Bronson
Six numbers..................Grieg
Nell B. Stockwell
Duos, Op. 5.......... Kotek
Mr. and Mrs. Lckwood
Four numbers .. Different composers
Miss Hunt
Accompaniments by Maud Okke4
berg and Mrs. George B. Rhead.

ALPHA NU SOCIETY INITIATES
.S NEW MEMBERS IN U. HALL
Alpha Nu debating society held ini-
tiations for 18 neophytes in University
hall Saturday afternoon.
J. R. ANGELL MEETS REGENTS
{ In compliance with a request
I of Dean James Rowland Angell, {
of the University of Chicago, {
members of the Board of Re-
gents held an informal meeting
Friday evening at Detroit to {
consider with Dr. Angell the
matter of the proposal of the
presidency of the University of - {
Michigan tendered him after the {
resignation of President Harry
{ B. Hutchins at the last session
I of the board.
While no action was taken,
{ nor any decision made, it is be- {
{ lieved that a definite disposal of {
{ the affair will ensue within the
following week. I

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:30, Theme: The Two Eternal Worlds
Noon,.Prof T. E. Rankin speaks to Students
6:30, Young People's Evening Serkice
Social half-hour follows this service

Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas
6:45 will speak before 6:45
ihThe Jewish
Tonight Tonight
Student Congregation
AT LANE HALL

F
1_

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