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October 16, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-16

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"HE WEATHER
CLOUDY; POSSIBLY
SHOWERS TODAY

r1P Ifr

~~Iait

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

XIX. No. 13.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1918.

PRICE THREE

_.. 1

U ENZA TOLL ON THE DECREASE
MOST OF THE RMY CAMPS;
FIGHT AGAINST IT IS STIFFENED

IS SHOWN IN 1ASSA-
TS; MOST STATES ARE
STATIONARY

WO S. A. T.,C. MEN DIE
AFTER SHORT ILLNESS'
1litary Authorities Are Aided by
Citizens in Fighting the
Epidemic,
(By the Associated Press) A
Washington, Oct. 15.-Spanish in-
aenza now has increased epidemic
'oportions in practically every state
the country, and in only three has
been reported as stationary, with
me increases in the situation in
assachusetts. In spite of all ef-
rts by federal, state, and local au-
orities the disease has spread rap-
ly and the toll has been big. .
In army camps the epidemic is sub-
ling, a further decrease in the num-
*r of new cases being noted today
the office of the surgeon-general
the army. In a total number of
ses reported was 6,498, a decrease
773 from yesterday.' Pneumonia
ses were 1,966, against 2,523 the day
fore, but the number of deaths in-
eased, being 889 against 726 yester-
,y.
Few New Ann Arbor Cases
Few new cases of Spanish influenza
me to light yesterday although two
en died as a result of the disease.
th were members of the military

SENIOR MEDICS
TO BE SALARIED
Seniors in the medical college will
receive $100 a month, in addition to
$4 a day for expenses, to aid in com-
bating the spread of the Spanish in-
fiuenza among S. A. T. C. men in the
barracks, and in different parts of
the state.
- The action was due to a request re-
cently sent from the surgeon-general's
office. The entire senior class offer-
ed. their services to help combat the
disease throughout the state. This
year's senior class is further advanc-
ed than any previous one, due to the
training they received during the
summer session this year. -
FEEDINGF"FU" CASES
A UDIFFICULT TISK

SQUADS
HARD

OF MEN HAVE WORKED
TO PREPARE PROPER
FOOD FOR SICK

Ralph Smith, of this city, a mem-
ber of the S. A. T. C., died at St.
Joseph's hosplital, He was appar-
ently well until yesterday morning,
but was reported sick at reveille. He
was immediately taken to the hospi-
tal. He had a hemorrhage of the lungs
during the afternoon and died soon
after.
The other victim of the disease was
William Convoy, of the signal corps.
He had been in Ann Arbor since last
summer, when he came with the
corps. He died of pneumonia early
yesterday morning after an illness
lasting for 10 days. Convoy's home
was in Minneapolis. His parents ar-
rived here yesterday to accompany
the body home.
Men Do Not Work Until Well
Those in charge of the S. A. T. C.
are using great precaution to pre-
vent men convalescing from the dis-
ease suffering a relapse. A system of
double checking has been introduced
to preclude any possibility of a man
being assigned to duty before he has
fullyrecovered.
"The military authorities here are
receiving hearty co-operation from
the people of Ann Arbor in combat-
ting the epidemic," Sergeant-Major
Fischer said yesterday. He said that
this was what is needed as there is
no compromising with the epidemic.
"It is like the Hun," Sergeant Fisch-
er remarked. "Either you down him
or he gets yu"
An order has been issued from head-
quarters that no .S. A. T. C. men are
to attend the football game Saturday.
This order does not affect the play-
ers, as it now stands- The.order was
issued after the medical authorities
decided that the Case game was large-
ly the cause of the spread of the epi-
demic.
One floor of the Homeopathic hos-
pital annex, which was rushed to com-
pletion for the purpose, is now ac-
commodating 15 convalescents.
Forest Fires Rage in Minnesota
Duluth, Minn., Oct. 15.-Fanned by
a high wind, forest fires broke out
afresh on a 25-mile front between
Lowrer and McGrath, about 60 miles
northwest of here. One (hundred
home guards have been sent to fight
the flames which are said to threaten
the destruction of McGrath, White
Pine, and Salona.
Reports from the burned area to-
night were to the effect that 725 bod-
ies had been recovered from the de-
vastated region so far as it could be
reached by rescue crews. Officials
continued to estimate the number of1

Feeding the sick has been one of
the big problems confronting the S.
A. T. C. officers during the past week
and a half. So many men have be-
come victims of the epidemic in such
a short time that there has been
little or no time for preparing to
cook the kind of food needed.
Cereals and toast have comprised
the greater part of the sibk diet for
the first day or so; later, the organi-
zation of the kitchen having been
completed, broths, stews and other
foods were added to the menu. All
the food was cooked in the Union
kitchens, being carried to thetInfirm-
aries and barracks by men detailed to
care for the sick.
The proc dure of getting the food
was simplioed in order to"prevent
it Mtaking too much time. The men
on the sick detail would secure from
their top sergeant or commanding of-!
ficer an order for rations for a cer-
tain number of men. This order they
would take to the steward and then
go to get the dishes. When they had
secured all the enameled ware nec-
essary they would form a line and
receive the food hot from the cook-
ers.
Squads of men loaded with trays of
steaming food hastening through the
streets at a gallop have become such
a common sight that citizens have
ceased to turn and stare. There has
been some difficulty in keeping the
food warm, especially when it has had
to be taken to the far end of Wash-
tenaw, or to the other end of the town
to some of the more remote barracks.
Saturday evening Captain Durkee
personally supervised the distribution
of fruit and sweets for the men con-
fined to the barracks, stopping to
speak to- every man that was awake.
TOTAL MORTALITY
ON OTRANTO IS 537
Islay, Sunday, Oct. 13.-According
to figures compiled here today and
published with army reference the to-
tal loss of life as the result of the
sinking of the transport Otranto is
527. These figures represent one of-
ficer, 357 American troops, 164 of the
Otranto's officers and crew, and six
members of the crew of a tramp
steamboat.
Up to tonight 266 bodies had been
recovered. Only two were found to-
day as the result of a change in the
wind, which now is blowing strongly
off shore and may sweep the bodies
far out to sea.
The work of recovering the re-
maining bodies of the disaster is ex-
ceedingly difficult owing to the rug-
ged coast and the tons of wreckage
which filled every crevice in the
rocks.

INTERNAL CONITIONS
TO FIX FINAL ANSWER
"NO SUPPLIES TO CONTINUE WAR"
SAYS GENERAL VON HIN-
DENBERG
Washington, Oct. 15.-Internal pol-
itical conditions in Germany, and pos-
sibly in Austria-Hungary, as well as
the military situations on the western
front, are expected to determine the
nature and kind of a German reply
to President Wilson's' communication
of.yesterday, which definitely closed
the door to peace negotiations with
German autocracy.
Reports reaching Washington today
through official channels not only in-
dicated the existence of almost chaotic
conditions in the central powers, but
also stated that Field Marshal von
Hindenberg himself was responsible
for the German government accepting
the President's peace terms and seek-
ing an immediate armistice.
It was said that at a recent meeting
of the military leaders and the text
of the parties in the reichstag, von
Hindenberg boldly declared that Ger-
many must have peace at once on the
best terms it could get. He said the
armies no longer had the necessary
supplies to continue the struggle, nor
was there any source of supply so
far as he was aware.
No indication has been given as to
when replies will be made by Presi-
dent Wilson to the Austrian and Turk-
ish governments for peace.
War Curios Seen
In N.S. Library
Belgian war documents recently re-
ceived are being exhibited at the
Natural Science library. German
placards, a trench newspaper, the
publication of the war office for the
soldiers, and a copy of La Libre Bel-
gique, a clandestine- paper, are in
the collection. Facsimiles for the
most part, .these samples are sent out
to interest -collectors for the benefit
of the Asiles des soldats invalides
Belges.
STUDY OF CLASSICS
AID TO EDUCATION
"That the study of classics gives
admirable preparation for the most
forceful use of English is illustrated
in the documents prepared by Presi-
dent Wilson," said Prof. Francis W.
Kelsey to his Latin students while
pointing out some of the practical
benefits of study of this kind.
"In none of his recent writings is
the power of forceful, presentation
more marked than in his reply to the
German peace proposals which was
published yesterday. In directness,
cogency, brevity and elevation of sen-
timent this will rank among the most
noteworthy peace documents known
to history.
"In all the Allied nations there are
many statesmen who have thought out
the problems as fully as President
Wilson who are endowed with equal
power of analysis and foresight. His
leadership as spokesman for the Al-
lied nations is due to many contri-
buting causes, but one. of these is as-
suredly his mastery of the art of ex-
pression.

"President Wilson is not only a man
of classical training but an earnest
advocate of classical studies as the
best preparation for life."
Six Feet Eight Too Much for Army
Wiggins, Miss., Oct. 15.-"Longest"
is no misnomer in the case of Pro-
fessor H. P. Longest, principal of the
school here. The army refused to ac-
cept Professor Longest as a soldier
because he is too tall. Examining
medical officers at Camp Shelby. where
Professor Longest arrived recently,
found him to be six feet eight inches
tall, the talleat man yet received at
the camp.

OFFICERS GIVE OUT
BANAK'S ADRESSES
LIST GIVEN TO AID PEOPLE TO
LOCATE MEN OR THEIR COM-
PANY'S HEADQUARTERS
So many people have trouble in
finding the different companies, com-
pany headquarters, and the - men
themselves, that the followi;ng list
was given out by regimental head-
quarters. The first barracks listed
under each company is the headquar-
ters of that company.
Co 5-barracks 17, 1408 Washte-.
naw avenue; barracks 18, 1437 Wash-
tenaw avenue; barracks 19, 1443
Washtenaw avenue; Co. 6-barracks
24, 1502 Hill street; barracks 23, 1550
Washtenaw avenue; barracks 20,
1511 Washtenaw avenue; barracks
19, 1443 Washtenaw avenue; Co. 7-
barracks 22, 1507 Washtenaw avenue;
barracks 21, 707 Oxford road; Co.
8-barracks 34, 733 South State street;
barracks 33, 806 Hill street; Co. 9-
Michigan Union. Companies 10, 11,
12, are not yet organized. Co. 130-
barracks 41, 556 South State street;
barracks 43, 548 South State street;
Co. 14-barracks 44, 512 South State
street; Co. 15-barracks 36, 607 South
State street; Co. 16-barracks 40, 603
South State street; barracks 42,
702 South University avenue; Co.
17-barracks 2, 426 North Ingalls
street; barracks 1, 823 East Kingsley
street; Co. 18-barracks 8, 1007 South
Huron street; barracks 7-A, 1003 East
Huron street; barracks 4, 314 North
Ingalls street; Co. 19-barracks 46,
corner Huron and State. streets; bar-
racks 11, 1000 East Washington street.
Loan Slackers
Iust Come Across
Subscriptions on the campus to the
Fourth Liberty Loan are coming in
slowly. Only $350 were taken in yes-
terday at the campus booth and $200
of this was subscribed by one girl.
The fact that the University was as-
signed no definite quota to fill and
that conditions on the campus are
greatly unsettled, accounts to some
extent for the small amount so far
subscribed, but those in charge of
the loan believe that more students
could and should buy bonds.
As stated formerly, S. A. T. C. men
may subscribe at the campus bboth if
they wish to make their initial pay-
ment of 10 per cent at this time. Oth-
erwise they may secure bonds at the
military headquarters and have the
amount subscribed taken from their
pay in installments.
The city subscription is still far
short of the quota although hope is
still held of "going over the top." In
an effort to raise the required amount,
a petition entitled "To Save the
Honor of Ann Arbor," is being circu-
lated among local business men. They
are asked to buy $5,000 worth of
bonds in addition to those they have
already bought. Several have al-
ready signed the petition and the Loan
committee hopes to get 20 signers.
K. P. DUTY CAUSES
PHARMACY BOLTS
The classes at the pharmacy college
show a poor attendance and when the
students are questioned as to their

delinquency, it is always the fault of
the K. P. duty. It is not known
whether - the S. A. T. C. men prefer
K. P. duty to classes or not, but this
can hardly be so from all the rumors
that are coming from that particular
quarter. Running a dishwasher is
not so bad, but when it comes to mop-
ping the floors and peeling potatoes
they rebel, if such a thing is possi-
ble, when working for Uncle Sam.
It is noticed that the navy men do
not have quite the same difficulty as
do those of the army. However, the
pharmacy college is living in hopes of
an arrangement among the authori-
ties that will systematize matters.

S.A.T.C.'S TO HAVE
A GLEE CLUB
Captain Durkee has given permis-
sion to Professor Harrison of the
University School of Music to organ-
ize a University glee club among the
men of the S. A. T. C. No tryouts
will be arranged until the present
"flu" epidemic passes over, and un-
der the plan, any University man will
be eligible whether in the students'
army or not. Professor Harrison has
already started sings in the war aims
lecture classes, and as soon as possi-
ble the try-outs for the men's glee
club will be held in the different bar-
rack.
CLASSES SHOULD HEED
ANTIf LU PRECUTIONS

YANKS POUND THROUGH HUN WIRE
DEFENSES1 ALLIES BLOTTING OUT
FLAN-DERSSALIENT; ENEMY RESIST

In order to prevent any further
spread of the influenza epidemic the
Health service advises that as far as
possible students should be separated
in classes where extra seats are
available.
Also, windows should be kept wide
open. When students keep on their
wraps in classes there is no danger of
catching colds with the windows
open. They are not nearly so liable
to take cold in this manner as they
are to go from a hot, ill-ventilated
room into the open. The use of chalk
to any extensive degree is also bad
as the chalk dust is dry and clogs
the nostrils.
The necessity of sneezing and
coughing into handkerchiefs cannot
be too strongly emphasized. It is
criminal negligence to be careless in
the slightest degree. Instructors
would be fully justified in requesting
offenders to leave the classroom.
Official S.A. T. C.
Rag On Campus
The flag on the pole near the li-
brary is the official banner of the
S. A. T. C., Sergeant-Major Fischer
announced yesterday when asked why
no- colors had been raised at head-
quarters.
He explained that at permanent
army posts the raising of the regi-
mental colors at reveille and the low-
ering of them at retreat is made an
impressive ceremony, for the men fall
in and go through formations near the
flag pole and the band plays. "Here,!
however," he said, "the men are sta-
tioned at the University for an indefi-
nite short period of tiihe and it was
not thought that they could be inoc-
ulated with the proper reverence for
these ceremonies." He added that
something might be done about this
matter later if it is learned how long
any detachment of S. A. T. C. men
will be stationed here.
For the enlightenment of the uni-
formed Sergeatn Fischer explained
that when officers, for no apparent
reason, turn toward the campus and
salute, it is because it is time for the
flag to be lowered or raised.°
French Stabilize Price of Wines
Paris, Oct. 15.-In. the department of
the Seine and Oisne the authorities
have fixed the price. of ordinary wine
with a view to preventing soldiers
from being the victims of exploiters'
who have been making them pay
fancy prices. The liter (pint and
three-quarters) of red wine was lim-
ited by decree to 32 cents and white
wine to 36.
Newspapers Affected By Embargo
Mexico City, Oct. 15.- Eighty-one
Mexican daily newspapers are af-
fected by the recent embargo impos-
ed by the United States government
on the exportation of newsprint papers
from the United States to Mexico.
Except for one plant which is con-
trolled by Germans, there are no pa-
per factories in Mexico.

HEALTH SERVICE ADVISES
WINDOWS IN CLASS-
ROOMS

OPEN
0.4

BRITISH WIN MENIN IN BI'
DRIVE; ENTIRE LINE
WEAKENS
FRANCO-BELGIANS TAKE
3,000 PRISONERS, 80 GUN
Italians Occupy Austrian Naval Bas
Entente Presses Huns in
Serbia
(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
With the American army northwei
of Verdun, Oct. 15.-(8:30 P. M.)--- I
the face of the most terrific bombar
ment, including that from hundreds
machine guns, the Americans advan4
ed again today and widened the breac
near Briguenay. *The Germans hea
ily shelled them and desperate cou
ter attacks were carried ou TheE
counter attacks failed. The erlca&
recaptured Hill 399 and penetrate
the strong wire defenses between La
dres-et-St. Georges and St. Juvin.
(By the Associated Press)
Havre, Oct. 15.-The French an
Belgian troops have captured 7,C
Germans and have taken 80 guns, a
cording to information issued by t
Belgium war office tonight.
(By Reuter's)
Hun Hurls in Eight Divisions
British headquarters in France, Oc
15.-Since Sunday morning eight 1
the German front line divisions i
Flanders have been thrown bac
broken and confused. This effort hE
not been a battle of administerin
justice, but rather a drive, and wher
towns that resisted at all strong:
the line was pushed on, closing, I
again behind, and leaving clearing u
parties to finish the work.
(By the Associated Pressy
Paris, Oct. 15.-The French trool
north of Laon and in Champagne has
made further important advancp
against the Germans, according to
official communication issued tonogb
The Grandpre-Vouziers road i
Champagne, west of Grandpre, is no'
in the hands of the French. Elgi
hundred prisoners were taken in t
day's fighting.
(By the Associated Press)
The Entente forces in Belgium aM
France continue successfully to dry
the enemy before them. In Belgia
Flanders it has been somewhi
rapid, but on all this sector the Ge:
mans are fighting desperately to hol
back their foes.
Allies Drive Big Wedge
The great wedge that Is being drF
en by the Belgians, British and Fren<
troops in Flanders, now threatens se:
iously the evacuation by the enemy
many positions in Flanders from t
Lys river to the sea, including the sul
marine and other bases along ti
coast. To the south, the Lille saliem
is gradually being crumbled, and ui
doubtedly will soon receive attentic
from the pincers which are beir
oiled for the task of reclaiming th
important front of territory as far
Valenciennes.
Meanwhile the French and Amer
can forces are struggling valiant
forward in their drive northward :
the Champagne region. The Germal
are vigorously defending their pos
tions, urging innumerable machix
guns in an endeavor to hold the
ground. Particularly of interest a:
the counter thrusts the Americans a:
being compelled to sustain east ax
west of the Meuse, where the enti:
enemy front is threatening with cc
lapse. In the Romange sector, furth
gains have been made by the ?Ae
icans In the face of terrific artillei

and machine gun fire. To the wei
the French are slowly closing in upo
Rethel on their way to Mezieres, b
ing only two miles distant from t.
town. West of Grandpre they hay
effected further crosses of the Aisn
Italians Bag Durazzo
In Flanders the British have take
the important railway center of Meni
and the Paris-Courtrai railroad ha
almost been won. Numerous towr
have been recaptured by the Alli
forces and large numbers of prisone:
have been taken. Many guns also ha'
(Continued on Page Six)

Detroit Has Patriotic Chinaman
Ah Wing, a Chinese storekeeper in
Detroit, has purchased six liberty
bonds, three of which he will send to
his sons in the Orient.

Carnegie "Tech" Gives War Courses
Pittsburg, Oct. 15.-A new course of
instruction for women has been in-
spired in the Carnegie Institute of
Technology by the Sergeant-Gen.
eral.

Some Sports Allowed at Harvard
Members of the students' army
training corps at Harvard may take
part in football, rowing, and cross
country running this fall. Football,
at first, will be confined to inter-com-
pany and inter-battalion contests.

A

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