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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 26, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- .+rs. ... r.rr..Y. ... r.

____

ANNOUNCE WOMEN
M E E T ENTRANTS
The following girls have qualified
in the preliminary apparatus meet
and are asked to report for the final
mneet Wednesday afternoon in Barbour
gymnasiumr
Freshmen:.Rope ladders-D. Gos-
pill, D. .Trevor, V. Seeley, H. Chipman,
I. Wolfstein, M. Patch, M. McCormich,
H. Gustin, D. Spaulding, I. Norris, B.
Summers. Swing jump-E. Erley, S.
MIueller, S. Witter, F. Weimer, E. Smith,
D. Samuelson. Fence vault-M. Henry,
M. Tibbals, F. Freeman, D. Samuelson,
H. Williams, I. Swan, S. Cooper, A.
Duffies. Oblique vault - M. Henry,
M. McCormich, 0. Hurlburt, M. Tib-
Ials, M. Rice, E. Bullock, M. Delf.
Window ladders - K. Currah, D. Mil-
ler, B. Warner, A. Barlow, E. Bullock,
M. Van Fleet. Hand traveling - E.
Howard, R. Seltzer, S. Wolczynski, E.
Stephenson, D. Samuelson, F. Buch-
bee, C. Bueloch.
Sophomores: Rope ladders - G.
Pierce, E. Strong, P. Wilie, M. Wears,
R. Ayres, D. England, H. Masters, M.
Rottschaeffer, G. Albrecht, J. Gifford.
Swing jump - B. Bush, Q. Summers,
M. Stimpson, D. Dunlap, J. McQuineas,
L. C. Olive. Fence vault - P. Wilie,
E. Erley, B. Bush, L. Blount, H. Koch,
Si ;Tsing-lieu, K. Schermerhorn. Hand
traveling - P. Wilie, K. Schermer-
horn, Q. Summers, M. Stimpson, C.
Fohey, B. Beckwith. Sommersault -
P. Wilie, L. Olive, M. Bath, E. Max-
well, J. MvQuineas, M. Stevens. Win-
dow ladders - H. Schermerhorn, P.
Wilie, B. Beckwith, E. Strong, L. Bad-
er, M. Rottschaeffer.
DR. W. S. MARTIN WILL SPEAK
TO WOMEN WEDNESDAY AT H. S.
Dr. W. S. Martin, of Battle Creek,
will give a special lecture to women at
7:30 o'clock Wednesday evening in the
high school auditorium. The lecture
will be illustrated by slides which Dr.
Martin has made himself. No admis-
sion will be made.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv.

US. .LEAGUE AMENDMENT
EXCLUDES FOREIGN LABOR,

(Continued from Page One)
ed the article will be an appendix to
the article pledging memebrs of th
league to respect and preserve agains
external aggression, territorial integ
rity, and existing political independ
ence of members. The mention o
the Monroe Doctrine was purposel
avoided.
Other changes in the covenant wer
made which are regarded by the Amer
ican delegates of great importance an
are calculated to met objections an
suggestions emanated from Amer
ica.

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ALLIES TO GO TO DALMATIA
Paris, March 25. - Reports
have reached the peace confer-
ence that inter-allied troops
will be landed at Spalato on the
Dalmatian coast because of the
disorders .that have occurred
there, and for fear that worse
disorders may arise. The Hun-
garians are reported to be try-
ing to spread bolshevism to that
part of the coast which they
controlled before the downfall
of Austria. The Hungarians are
credited with aiming to sieze the
portion of the former Austrian
fleet held by the Jugo-Slavs.
REASIRY SAVINGS DIVISION
ENCOURAGES STUDENT THRIFT

Plans for Revision
Provision was made for the revi-
sion of the covenant itself from time
to time, this meeting the objection that
it is'inflexible. The admission of other
states was provided for, but it was
agreed that any change in numbers
must be with due regard to the pro-
portion of the representation of the
large and small powers on the execu-
tive council as defined in the articles
creating the council.
Clarifying Changes
Many changes in the text of the
covenant were made for the purpose
of clarification. Some doubt is en-
tertained in some quarters as to the
wisdom of amendments affirming ab-
solute control of countries over their
internal affairs as possibly prohibit-
ing the extension of outside aid to put
down revolutions and it is possible
this language may be further modi-
fied.
"Just" Treatment for Japanese
One amendment to be submitted
adopts a provision that powers which
are not specifically delegated to the
league are . reserved to individual
members. Nothing has been done to
affirmatively state the right of a na-
tion with regard to its withdrawal
from the league nor has the Japanese
amendment regarding racial discrim-
ination been reached. The latter has
been modified so as to simply declare
that the right of "just" treatment be
given and is likely to be accepted.
A French amendment providing'for
the maintenance of a general military
staff has been proposed but thus far
it has not been accepted.

I ,

All universities, colleges, and norm-
al schools are to join in a campaign
to make the United States a nation
of intelligent savers, according to a
plan evolved by the savings division
of the United States treasury depart-
ment and the American council on
education. The creation of thrift or-
ganizations is contemplated in each
of the normal schools, colleges, and
universities to teach the basic prin-
ciples of intelligent saving, wise buy-
ing, sane spending, safe investment.
Avoidance of waste and aid in featur-
ing the advantages of Thrift Stamps
and War Savings Stamps is sought.

WHATS GOING ON
TODAY
7:00-Commere club meets in room
102, Economics building. Meeting
over in time for the opera.
7:30-Dr. W. S. Martin of Battle Creek
talks to women in the High School
auditorium.
TOMORROW
7:00-Men commissioned at Fort
Sheridan meet at the Union.
7:30-Catholic Study club meets at
K. of C.
8:00-Classical club meets in room
A, Alu~mni Memorial hall.
ECONOMY THROUGH QUALITY
Every-Day Model
Nettleton "eArdsley' Last
Laced Oxford Style. In
Black or Dark Tan Russia
Calfskin.
The "Ardsley is one of the'most
favored of the NETTLETON master-
lasts and is reproduced in a great many
styles and materials. In the above leathers
it is particularly typical of the NETTLE-
TON ideal of combining looks, comfort
and long service; that is, of effecting
economy through extraordinary quality
rather than price.

Ann Arbor May Festival
SIX CONCERTS-MAY 14, 15, 16,17
FOUR DAYS OF MUSIC
SOPRANOS
ROSA PONSELLE
Prima donna Metropolitan Opera Company
ANNA FITZIV
Prima donna Chicago Opera Company
LOIS M. JQfliNSTON
The Pride oi Detroit
CONIRALTOS
LOVKSE ~iOMEK
Prima donna Metropolitan Opera Company
ME RL 1 ALCOCK
Distinguished Amer ican Artist
MINEKVA KcMINARSKI
Splendid Polish Artist
T~ENXORS
FERM4ANDlO CARI
Metropolitan and Chicago Opera Companies
ART HV HACKET T
American Artist of Note
BARITONES
EMILIO deGOGOXRZA
Eminent Spanish Artist
ROBERT o. 1IET ERLE
An Ann Arbor Favorite
BASSES
ANDRtS deSEGVROLA
Metropolitan Opera Company
GUSTAF HOLMQVIST
A Festival Favorite
INSTRUMENTALISTS
OSSIP oABRILOWITSCH
Noted Pianist Conductor
CHAKE~ M COVRtBOIN
Belgian Organist
ORGANIZATIONS
CHICAGO SYMPHONY
OKCH ESTR. A
Frederick Stock, Conductor
CHORAL WORKS
VNIVEKtSIT? CHORAL UNION
Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
eFaust" (Gounod), "Ode to Musie" (Hadley),
"Fair -- a iFreedom" (Stanley)
TICKETS- IAIL +u ,D. I f Ir tekets new being received will be filled
in order ot rece pt. $4.5,. $5.00, $.600.$7.00. (If cver coupon tsreturneq
deduct $3.00)

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elgian Rulers Pay Visit to Pershing
Chaumont, March 25. - King Al-
ert and Queen Elizabeth of Bel-
um spent the night at the head-
uarters of General Pershing and left
y automobile for Brussels.
Students read The Daily.--Adv.

.i
:,

Junior Sinls' Play
Wed. Evening, April 2,
WHITNEY THEATRE

Wahr's Shoe Store
108 S. MAIN ST.

Agent for Nettleton Men's Shoes--
the 'World's Finest

.F.

.
1 1

FOR

I

BICYCLES

OR

REPAIRS

MANY STARS PROMISED FOR
PATRIOTIC MAY FESTIVA
(Continued from Page One)
master, who has made during the pa
few years a splendid reputation1
America as organist in responsible c
pacities.

L
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Handy service at

Ho L, SWITZER & CO,
310 South State Street
Northwestern University
LAW SCHOOL
Founded 1859
John H. Wigmore, Dean
ANNOUNCES
Third term opens Monday, March
31st, fourth term, Thursday, June
19th. New students may enter at
beginning of either term.
Increase in Requirements for
Admission and Graduation
Admiision: after September ist, x9x9,
students entering for the first time will
be required to submit proof of the sat-
isfactory completion of three years of
college study.
Gradudtion: Four years (or 36 months)
of residence study is required, EXCEPT
that students entering Law School with
a bachelor's degree representing a four-
year course in an approved college,
may complete the course in three years
(Or 27mntasths).
)tor detailed information address the

"Faust," Climax
The climax of the festival will be
reached in thelosing concert, Satur-
day evening, when Gounod's "Faust"
will be heard in a cast in which will
be found leading operatic stars, such
as Anna Fitziu of the Chicago Opera
company, Fernando Carpi of the same
organization, Emilio de Gogorza, the
Spanish artist, and Andres de Segurola
of the Metropolitan; Minerva Kome-
narski, Polish tenor, and Robert R.
Dieterle.
Plans Suggested for Milk Delivery
New York, March 25. -- Distribution
of New York city's milk supply
through underground pneumatic tubes
formerly used for mail service as a
means of lowering cost was suggested
at the continuation of the "John Doe"
inquiry into the high cost of milk.
Carriers with a capacity of six quart
or 10 pint bottles could be sent at the
rate of one every six seconds through
tubes covering a great portion of the
city, it waj said.
Michigan's paper for Michigan men.
Four thousand students read it every
mornin.-Adv.
For service and results try a Daily
Wan-t Ad.-Adv.
EATURING

4

Formal Dress for the Opera and Hop

As presented by the Hudson Store, Detroit

-

THE dress must be new-of course. Nothing else
would do sufficient honor to the formal renewal of
campus gaiety which the Hop represents. Both the Hud-
son Women's Fashion Salon and the Hudson Misses'
Shop have formal gowns new and bewilderingly attrac-

W HO can doubt that "now is the time for all good
men to come to the aid of the party?" The party;
of course, being the Hop.
As a student in good standing you, personally, will
enjoy the festivity after the really excessive strain of the

-1-

semester's work.

As a student in other than good stand

tive to submit -to your critical inspection.

ing you-well, to be blunt-you will need it, now won't
you?

They are of satin and tulle and lace and taffeta and

combinations of all of these.

Many of those latest arriv-

THE Hop requires formal dr
also calls for dress suits.

ess. Opera night, Friday,
Hudson's Men's Store is

ed from New York are of black which is excedingly good
for evening wear this season. Pale evening shades of

tulle and taffeta are charmingly combined.

J'HE Misses' Shop is showing one affair of pale green
with a rainbow bodice of delicate shades that is both

I

Secretary of the Law School.
Northwestern University Bldg.
Lake and Dearborn St.
Chicago, Illinois.

new and charming.

Others are of apricot or orchid bead-

able to furnish you with everything necessary to either
occasion.
SHE Hudson store carries the dress wear of one of the
best known makers of men's clothing in the country.
Dress suits are $35 and higher. One particularly good
looking suit, which we have found many young men pre-
fer to a more conservative suit, is made with a small side
pocket and cuffs. These are bound with satin as is the
collar and the lapels are also of satin. This is $55. More
conservative models are to 'be bought for the same price.
It goes without saying that these suits are altered to fit
you 'when necessary.
Hudson's-Second Floor-New Men's Building
ALL the accessories to formal dress are carried by the
Hudson Store in the shops on the first floor of the

.5.

WE ARE F
English

11

Tweed

Caps

M/ANUFACTURED BY

Ayres

& Smith Lt'd.

I
ji

ed with sunbursts and whirls of colored beads.
The Women's Fashion Salon is also well qualified to
fill your wants and match the rest of your costume in any
one of a dozen shades. The prices of these gowns are
from $25 to $75 with a particularly good selection at $35.
grHE Fashion Salons can also furnish you with an ap-
propriate evening wrap and the other shops in the
Hudson store will show you what is latest in evening
footwear, fans, gloves, scarfs and under silks.
Hudson's-Third Floor Woodward Building

Men's Building.

Any one of the salesmen there will

LONDON, ENG.

furnish you with whatever you, need to make your cos-
tume complete; gloves, dress shirts, ties, collars, studs, or
socks; and on the mezzanine floor you will find shoes

r-

and hats.

Wadhams & Co.

Hudson's-Men's Building-Woodward Avenue

STATE STREET STORE

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