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March 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-26

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VOL. XXIX. No. 124. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS
I I

BOARD OF REGENTS TO CONFER
WmiT EDUCATOR% THIS
GOVERN MENT RE~LEASES
ANGELL FROM PROMISE
To Assume Duties at End of Present
Univerity Year if He Takes
Presidency
The meeting of Dr. James Rowland,
Angell, dean of the faculty of the U11-
versity of Chicago, with the Board of
Regents the latter part of this week
in Detroit may result in the accept-
ance of the University presidency by
Dean Angell, according to the Detroit
News.
This happening combined with Dean
Angell's release from a tentative
promise with the War department to
assume control of the educational
work of theAmerican Army In France,
indicates that he will probably ac-
cept.
Recognizes Low Salaries
As a salary, the president ,of the
University receives $10,000 p. year and
secures the use of a resldence on the
campus. It may be that Dean Angell
is dissatisfied with the stipend which
he is offered, but it may be also that
he recognizes the weakness of the
University In not paying larger sala-
ries to its faculty, says the Detroit
newspaper.
To Start In June
If he gives his consent to the Re-
gents' supposed offer of the presi-
dency, he will assume his duties at the
end of the present University year in
June, succeeding President Harry B.
Hutchins.
Hopera Number
Of Gargoyle Out
The "Hopera Number" of the Gar-
goyle apepared this morning.
The magazine has increased its size
over that of previous numbers of this
year by eight pages. ThIs was made|
possible by the return of normal con- i
ditions--writers are writing again, ar-
tists are drawing, advertisers are ad-
vertising, Dr. Tom Lovell is actively
poetizing, and the Gargoyle has pro-
fited by all these facts. -
Among those who returned to the
University from military service at
the beginning of the semester is Reed
Bachman, '20, former art editor. He
has been given charge of the art des
partment again. His cover design,
which is . considered one of the best
in the history of the Gargoyle,, is a
feature of this number.-'
The staff of writers has also been
strengthened. Among those who have
returned is Earl Wiener, '19L. While
the number was in process of mak-
- Ing, Lester Roseubaumn, '14, man~ag-
lug editor for the college year '13-'14,
visited the office and helped with sug-

gestions and contributions.
No acount of the magazine would
'be complete that did not give the
highest praise to the poem by Dr.
Tom Lovell. The erudite doctor has
produced one of the incunabula of the
esoteric in his poem upon "Hopping
-About." No Hopper will be able to
Hop so intelligently nor so joyously
as he should without a perusal of
these deathless lines.

JOURNALISTS EARON
structoro jurnalis in the Univer
sity and now secretary of the editorial
board of the Detroit News, and Prof.
F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric depart-
ment, were the principal speakers at
the smoker held Tuesday night at the
Union under the auspices of Sigma
Delta Clii, professional journalistic
fraternIty. Both of the speakers gave
Interesting talks on the profession of
journalism.
Mr. Wfhite has been actively en-
gaged In newspaper work in various
parts of the country and many -side-
lights of the so-called "game" inter-
spersed his speech. Professor Scott
outlined to some extent the past, pres-
ent and future possibilities of the
newspaper profession. He explained
and refuted many of the wrong im-
pressions of journalism as a profes-
sion.
A good representation attended the
meeting. Clarence Roeser, '19, manag-
Ing editor of The Michigan Daily, was
the toastmaster.
SENIOR COMMI1TTEE ANNOUNCES
NOMINEES; OFFICES TO TAKE
EFFECT AT ONCE
Campus election for officers of the
Women's league for the year 1919
1920 will be held Thursday, April 17,
in University hall. The candidates,
chosen by a nomination, committee
composed of senior members of the
present board of directors and other
representative upper-class women ap-
pointed by Doris McDonald, '19, pres-
ident of the league, are as follows: for
president, Marguerite Chapln, '20, and
Sue- Verlenden, '20; vice-president, El-
sie Erley, '20, and Florence Field,
'0; treasurer, Cornlia Clark '21, and'
tary, Marguerite Clark, '21, and Flora
Belle Ellis, '20; corresponding secre-
tary, Isabelle Swan, '22, and Gwen-
dolyn Treat, '22; senior rep resenta-
tive, Marian Ames, '20, and Gretchen
Jones, '20; Junior representative, Es-
ther Paffenbach, '21, Josephine Waldo,
'21, and Gladys Reineke, '21; sopho-
more representative, Helen Bishop,
'22, and Agnes Holmquist, '22.
The new officers will assume their
duties immediately following the elec-
tion.
COUNCIL A~RRANGES
SWING OUT DA TE
Date for the senior Swing-out and
the annual All-campus election were
set for April 22 and 24, respectively,
at the meeting of the student council
'Tuesday evening. William W. Hi.-
shaw, '20, is chairman of the swing-
out committee and Samuel J. Slavens,
'19D, was appointed to arrange for the
election.
The new constitution for thea coun
cil will be one of the Issues ba-oe
upon if the committee on non-athletic
student affairs passes on it. All cam-
pus organizations are urged to draw
up a list of candidates for the elec-
vtd uilnbe published three
time befor the election.'

HARRY LUNDGREN, 'iSM, DIES
AFTER ILLNESS OF ONE WEEK
Harry Lundgren, '18M, of Ironwood,
Michigan, died yesterday In the con-
tagious ward of the University hos-
pital, of bronchial pneumonia. Lund-
gren had been sick only a week. He
belonged to the Phi Beta P1 frater-
nity and was an honorary member of
the Galen society. He was 26 years
old.

EVERYTHING READY FOR INITIAL
51*0 WING OF"COME ON, DAD"; SHUTER
ASSURES SUCCESS OF 12TH OPERA

IINSURRECTION IN EGYPT
ILondon, March 25.- Defend-
ing the military service bill at
the house of commons, Winston
Spencer Churchill, secretary of
Iwar, declared that the whole of
Egypt was in a virtual state of
insurrection. The position 'was
so dangerous that the govern-
, nent had to appeal to men on
the point of demobilization to
return to save their comrades
from being murdered.
Patriotism to Be Keynote of Program;
Annual Event Is Tribute' to
Gallant Warriors
CONCERTS TO NUMBER SIX;
WILL OCCUPY FOUR DAYS
Prof. A. A. Stanley is working out
the programs for the Victory Coin-
memnorative festival, consisting of six
concerts, which will take place during
four days beginning May 14 to May
17, on a basis which will represent the
best in music literature and at the
same time will stand as a tribute 'to
the gallant sons of 'America who have
served their country so faithfully. A
spirit of American patriotism will per-
meate the entire week. Never before
has the list of soloists contained the
names of so many distinguished Amer-
iAmrrican Singers to Appear
One of the two major choral works
to be given by the Choral union and
artists which Professor Stanley has
chosen is the "Ode to Music," compos-
ed by Henry Hadley, recognized by
many as America's foremost compos-
er. Of the four artists who will par-
ticipate, three of them, Lois M. John-
ston, soprano; Merle Alcok, contralto;
and Arthur Hackett, tenor; are Amer-
icans, while the fourth, Gus taf Holm-
quist, bass, is an American, although
of Norse decent.
Professor Stanley has also written
eseial fo h cainaneet
ige ad m eousok "Fai Land
of Freedom," which is purely patriotic
in character.
Stock's March to Be Heard
Aohe fetr ill be awrk -for
orchestra en titled "A March for De-
mocracy," written by Frederick
Stock. It received its first perform-.
ance in Chicago a short time ago on
the occasion of Mr. Stock's resump-
tion of the leadership of the Chicago
Symphony orchestra. --
The star at the first evening's con-
cert, Rosa Ponselle, is a young Amer-.
ican woman, whose recent triumphs
at the Metropolitan opera company
have stamped her as one of the most
brilliant artists ever heard at that in-
stitution.
Louise Homer, the ever-popular
"American Mother Musician," will be
the stellar attraction at the Friday
evening concert.
Detroit Conductor to Play
In addition to the sparkling or-
chestral selections, on' Friday after-
noon, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, the dis-
tinguished pianist-conductor to whom
the remarkable success of the De-
troit Symphony orchestra is largely
due, will apepar as soloist.
Frieze Memorial organ will be
heard in a program under the hands
of Charles M. Courboin, a Belgian
(Continued on Page Six)

CAMPUS TO JUDGE PRODUCTiON
TONMGHT AT TILE WHIT-
NEY THEATER
LAST REHEARSALS HELD
UNTIL WEE SMIA' HOURS
Lines and Lyrics Equal to Those of
Most Professional Ventures
Stays iDirector
Everything is in readiness for the
raising of the -curtain Wednesday
night on "Come On, Dad," the twelfth
Michigim Union opera. The authors,
directors, and members of the com-
pany have doane their best. The meas-
ure of their success will be judged
tonight by the campus.
For the last three nights dress
rehearsals have been held extending
way into the morning. The company
is letter perfect, the dances are down
to the step, and everybody knows ex-
actly what he is to do. All indica-
tions point to one of the, best opreas
the Union has ever produced.
E. Mortimer Shuter, director, is cer-
tain the show will be a success. The
lines and lyrics he says are the equal
of those in most Professional ven-
tures. Everybody who has heard the
music has exclaimed over Its tuneful-
ness, and predicted that certain of the.
songs will take their places with past
opera tunes that have enriched Michi-
gan student life. He is very well
pleased with the spirit with which
members of the cast and chorus have
entered into their work.
The 20 pice orchestra has rehearsed
faithfully under direction of Earl V.
Moore, musical director, and is ready
to contribute its bit toward making
the production an unqualified success.
The house is nearly sold out for to-
night's performance as well as those
salethas delighted Ferdinan dC. Bell
'21L, general chairman. Expenses are
guaranteed, and if the road trip breaks
even the Union will make a little
money on the venture. Smal profit has
been expected because of the heavy ex-
pense assumed to make this a "come-
back opera." More than $5,000 has
been spent. .
The curtain will rise at 8:15 o'clock.
CERGLEFRANGI~~CK
COEYFO RDUTO

INDEPENDENT S TAT
of the old Union. It is expected by
Karl Velde, '20, the chairman of the
Hop committee, that a large number
of booths will~ be distributed at this
session.
Not a sufficient number of men ap-
plied Tuesday to warrant the J-Hop
committee proceeding with the offer
of Helen Newberry residence as a
stopping place for visiting girls. Only
about 15 desired to take advantage of
this offer, and consequently the mat-
ter will be dropped.
Invitations were given out Tues-
day afternoon in the lobby of the old
Union. All who were not present to
secure them may obtain them from
Karl Velde at 1437 Washtenaw ave-
nue.
ALOOFNESS FROM PUBLiC DiiTY
CAUSES LACK OF NOTORITY,
SAYS PROFESSOR
Engineers have not occupied the
place in our public life that they de-
serve, according to Prof. John C.
l5arker, of the electrical engineering
department. Professor Parker believ-
es that the young engineer shold face
his future prepared to fill a place in
our national life just as the young
lawyer and the doctor is prepared.
"T. engineer has never taken the
place in public life for which his
training peculiarly fits him. The eng-
ineer in general, is an exreel lron
of his education should be of immense
service to society. The reasons why
he has nt taken his poper place in
public life are first, a lck of realiza-
tion of the fact that there is a place
for him to occupy; second, the fact
that he usually has no education in
the th eory, in economics, sociology
and hstory. E
"In specific illustrationsapparenl I
the state legislature did not realize
that there was such a person as an
engineer, when in 1907 it created its
railway commission, which by law
contains a lawyer, the other two com-
missioners being undescribed as to
training and experience. This was
done in face of the fact that the com-
mission had jurisdiction over the rates
and service .provided by hundreds of
millions of dollars worth of engineer-
mng properties, including railroads,
trolleys, interurban lines, telephone
systems, electric light corporations,
and gas companies.
"I resent that, but I resent still
more the fact that the engineer has
by his aloofness form public duty al-
lowed himself to be over looked.
Enicourage New Subjects
"Every department head in the eng-
ineering college is encouraging the
election of studies in political science,
and in the social sciences. Practical-
ly all the instructors are laying great
stress on the n1ecessity for participa-
tion in public affairs by the youthful
engineers."
NURSING ASSOCIATION TO All)
IN TUBERCULAR TREATMENT
Circular letters have been sent out
to all the physicians in Ann Arbor

lic Health Nursing association is will-
ing and able to co-operate with them
in taking care of their tuberculosis
patients and teaching the families how
to prevent the spread of the disease
Proceeds of the 'sale of the Red Cross
Christmas seals go to the furthering
of this work. Because of no sales lasi
Christmas, the Red Cros apportioned
an adequate amount to cover this~
year's budget.

EXECUTIVE COUTNCIL EMPOWERED
TI'( PLAN ARMAMENT
REDUCTION
POSSIBLE TO REVISE
COVENANT AS NEEDED
French Proposal for Mamntenanoe of
(General )lilitary Staff Not -
Accepted
(By Associated, Press)
Vienna, March 24. -- All mnembers
of the allied missions in Budapest have
been interned, Including Colonel Vix,
the chief of the French mission, ac-
cordinig to travelers arriving here by
automobile from the Hungarian capi-
tal. Except for official messages there
is iio communication by telephone be-
twen Budapest and Vienna.
Paris, March 25. - An American
amendment to protect nations .against
the influx of foreign labor was adopt-
ed today by the league of nations corn-
mission. It affirms the right of any
country in the league to control mat-
ters solely within domestic Jurisdic-
tion.
Another important amendment to
the league covenant affects article
eight, which empowers the executive
,cbuncil to formulate a plan for the
reduction of armanments. The lan-
guage of the article Is altered to lim-
it the power of thme council to a sim-
ple recommendation to the gover-n-
ments affected.
Monroe Doctrine Not' Mentioned
One amendment provides that agree-
ments under the covenant shall not
be construed as an enfringeinent' up-
on th3e principles of international pci-
icies heretofore recognized. As fram-
(Continued on Page Six)
On Ferry Field
A faint buzz, a louder whirr, and
then a distinct sound of rapid explo-
sions filled the air. A few on the
streets looked up and stopped. Others
suddenly noticing their strange posi-
tion glanced heavenward - and also
stopped, for there, sailing gracefully
only a short distance up, was the first
plane that had been near Ann Arbor
for months.
*'It circled easily above town and
then made for Ferry field, where it
landed. In no time the curious were
out in force, and free were the com-
ments of all.
Lieutenants harris and Ludlow, the
passengers, had flown from Detroit,
they said, to find a suitable landing
place for the large Caproni plane
which will soon .fly out here. They
seemed satisfied with Ferry field, aP.
though a larger field would be bet-
ter, they declared. After talking a few.
minutes they climbed in again. Tax-
ing toward the stands, they, turned
around into the wind and opend the
motor wide. The plane just cleared
the trees at the south end of the
field and headed toward Detroit.
I WOMEN'S tGY3 LIST UP

* enter the final apparatus meet
are posted in Barbour gymnas-
ium and in the Women's league
room in University hall. The
* meet will be held at 4 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon in Bar-
obur gymnasium. One honor
t point is awlahed each particip-
Iant in the finals.

"NOS INTIMES" TO BE ACTED
FRENCII STUDENTS
APRIL 26

BY

"Nos Intimes,'' the annual play of
the Cercle Francais, will be presented
April 26 in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The play will be in the nature of a
complicated comedy, with a thread of
the love story, dealing with the sort
who makes friends too easily only to
find, in the end, the folly of hastily
formed friendship. .
'The cast selected for the play will
be as follows: 't'holosan, L. J. Seltz-
er, '20; Marecat, A. J. Himmelhoch;
Caussade. A. 'W. Wilson, '21E; Maur-
ice, I. V. Brock, '19; Vigneux, J. P.
Freedman, '21; Abdallah, D. A. Watts,
'21; Lancelat,, L. L. Vander, '22; De la
Richaudiere, W. Emmons, '19; Un
'Jardinier, H. S. Velleman, '21; Raph-
ael, N. S. Lambert, '22; Cecile, Bere-
nice Warsaw, '22; Benjamine, Helen
Roleafs, grad.; Madame Vigne-ux,
Marion Hays, '19; Jenny, Nora Wil-
son, '21; Francoise, Louis De Veries,
'21.
The time for the opening of the
play, which was announced through
an error on the program as 8:30
o'clock has been changed to 8 o'clock.

Special Perlormance of "COME ON DAD"
Saturday Evening, March 29

1 to6 TdayforMembrs f Unon.General sale at Whitney Theatre beginning Thursday Morning

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