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October 15, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SWAIT r.I AIuANTS

IN OF WAR

A Ti IS TRARS FImCEs

DRIVE 195,242 RIVETS ON ALL
SEPTEMBER 13 AT
HOG ISLAND

BUT FIRST 20 HAVE BEEN
HERE FOR SOME
TIME

Washington, Oct. 14. A drive for a
ship-riveting record in an American
shipbuilding plant is like a drive of
the Yanks against the Hun lines in
France. Both demand intensive prep-
aration. Pershing's commanders at
the front and John Wolf, builder of
ships in the Hog Island yard are us-
ing the same methods.
That is how Wolf, the world's cham-
pion general foreman ship riveter, set
a new record with his gangs and drove
195,242 rivets in eight hours at the
Hog Island yard on Friday, Sept. 13.
Asked how he and his men did it,
Wolf said:
"Before the American troops over
yonder make a drive on the Hun they]
make careful preparations days in ad-
vance. I follow the same principle in
getting ready for a riveting drive.
Secret to Rivet Success
"What is the secret of the success
of my gangs? Well it's as simple as
the nose on your face. The first thing
I do is to put my huskies next to the
big idea in the shipbuilding game. I
hammer it into their heads that every
rivet they drive is equal to a stout
nail into the coffin of that arch child
murderer, the Kaiser. In other words,
I make their part in this war game so
real that they pound rivets like the
boys over there pump machine guns.
"To hit the bull's eye in a riveting
d(ive, you've got to prepare for it like
the Yanks arrange for a drive against
the Huns. When General Pershing
gets it into his head that he wants to
give the Hun a good hard bump he
takes a few thousand Ynk huskies
back of the line, and puts them
through a stiff course of sprouts in
the way of intensive training. When
the boys have completed the course
they are as hard as tsteel nails and
they can wae through anything.
Boss Plans All Drives
"I lined things up for my drive in
much the same way. When things
opened up I had the holes all reamed
and the proper tools all in place. So
when the drive started we had a whirl-
wing, start, and the way we walked
away from the other 9kngs was good
to see. According to my way of figur-
ing this thing. called morale is blamed
important in any game. I don't care
a rap whether it's soldiering or driv-
ing rivets, you've got to have the boys
mentally and physically up to snuff.
I airn to keep my huskies standing
right up on their toes most of the
time. In the respect of keeping the
boys in a fighting mood, I am aided by
my boss riveter, Joe Diamond, who
has been in the game for more than
twenty years, and has worked in ship-
yards all over the country.
"Why, when the drive was, the hot-
test even our superintendent, Walter
Blandford, got the fever. lie chucked
off his coat, grabbed a riveting ham-
mer and drove 350 rivets. My hus-
kies have the spunk and the ginger
that counts."
The record for the entire yard on
that day was 195,242 rivets in eight
hours, or thirty-eight rivets per hour
per production gang. Wolf's gangs
drove 19,037 rivets, or an average per
hour, per gang of fifty-five rivets.
Wolf is 58 years old, a seasoned
shipbuilder of the old school, and fa-
miliar with every turn and wrinkle
of the shipbuilding game in the United
States. In addition to being a compe-
tent shipbuilder, he is a natural lead-
erof men.
Power of Tanks Admitted by Germans
New York, Oct. 14. German news-
papers received here generally attri-
bute the success of the Allied offensive
to the employment of huge numbers
of "tanks."

The following papers are at the
registrar's office and must be called
for today. The papers belonging to
the first 20 men mentioned came in
Monday.
Morton M. Carlisle.
Victor H. de Baeke.
Walter F. Desmond.
Murray F. Gardner.
Ralph W. Garlick.
Roy L. Glouz.
Gerald Hahn.
Clarence H. Hsarpst.
Russell L. Hogue.
Olin J. Kinsel.
Bruce G. Logan.
Frank J. Novak.
August C. Plichta.
George C. Prather.
Israel C. Rosenstein.
Alfred Slotnick.
Paul J. Wieselberg.
Saymour B. Wilson.
Arthur J. Stock.
Harold T. Stock.
Anderson, Howard H.
Anthony, Robt. J.
Austin, Russell H.
Bailey, Edison W.
Barnum, Shirley A.
Baron, Benjamin.
Beebe, Robt. E.
Bennett, Carlton W.
Bennie, Earl.
Beresford, Edwin M.
Bertch, John W.
Bialosky, Leon blI.
Bleich, Harry E.
Bookerman, Geo. E.
Braidwood, Maurice J.
Brittson, Donald D.
Bronson, Harold S.
Brown, Ian Hartwell.
Brown, Robt. A.
Brown, Wm. L.
Browne, Walter A.
Brushart, Marshall E.
Carskadon, Thos. R.
Carter, Clarence C.
CliTisty, Chas. J.
Conklin, Claude K.
Collins, Howard M.
Crawford, John R.
Crane, Peter W.-
Dean, Donald E.
Dearborn, Clinton H.
Defley, Joseph E.
Demirjian, Ardishers.
Denebein, Jacques E.
Dieters, Dirk R.
Dougherty, Jas. R.
Driver, Robt,. W.
Dudman, Arthur F.
Dukes, Ray L.
Evans, Wm. L.
Fergus, Edward V.
Finney, Raymond G.
Finzel, Theron L.
Follis, Wesley I.
Fortune, Wm. P., Jr.
France, John S.
Frazer, Wm. R.
Freydl, Chas. M.
Garman, Lawrence R.
Gavey, Andrew J.
Gersonde, Ralph A.
Gronberg, Anson B.
Gnau, Howarth W.
Goldberg, Martin M.
Gray, Wm. A.
Gustafson, Earl W.
Griffith, Hunter G.
Hager, Earl W.
Hanlon, John R.
Harrison, Chas. G.
Gordon, Wm. Harry.
. Harstin, Hugh H.
Heard, Guy A.
Hedges, Eric B.
Hart, Cecil B.
Hinckley, G.
Hopkins, Myron Ball
Howard, Raymond L.
Halbert, Edward A.
Hutson, Jas. D.
Ingle, Jas. W.

Johnson, Henry A.
Kappler, Herman C.
Kaufman, Oscar A.
Kendrick, Wm. S.
Kerlikowsk,. Louis W.
Kirtz, Harry
Kline, Richard H.
Kondratowicz, Chester A.
Kornetzke, Geo. R.
Kresge, Stanley S.
Landis, John D.
Lee, Edgar .L.
Lester, Jennings C.
McCavey, Jas. G.
McDuffie, Howard
McIntosh, Julian G.
Mabee, Marcus R.
Mahoney, Jas. W.
Mangouni, Nazareth O.,
Meade, Cleburne J.
Meilander, Leonard F.
Merica, Arnold A.
Mills, Samuel.
Mitchell, Grant.
Mitchell, Homer C.
Morrison, Leonard.
Moynahan, Roy D.
Murphy, Jas. E.
Neef, Arthur F.
Neiman, Abraham S.
Nelson, Earl G.
Nicholson, Earl H.
Noble, Geo. S.
Norris, Wm. S.
Pellow, Wm. F.
Phillips, Carvel S.
Prewitt, Clifton B.
Quinlan,, Thos. Q.
Reichner, Charles.
Reid, Elliott G.
Richardson, Clyde F.
Richman, John M.
Riley, Marion G.
Ritchie, Robt. E.
St. John, Edwin S.
Sanderson, Donald.
Schroeder, Albert F.
Schweitzer, Leo W.
Scoville, Jas. M., Jr.
Severin, Halmer.
Shroyer, Raymond R.
Sikes, Ward S.
Skinner, Calvin H.
Smith, Ralph O.
Southard, Frank E., Jr.
Stacey, John D.
Stalker, Edward A.
Starrett, Goodwin R.
Stallard, Ralph B.
Stone, Geo. F.
Stratton, Schuyler W.
Sylvestre, Louis M.

Taft, Gerald F.
Tarnowsky, Alexander.
Thomas, Franklin M.
Timchac, Theodore A.
Thurston, Lloyd M.
Tice, Hilton O.
Tobin, Orvalle C.
Tripensee, Arthur C.
Van Bottom, Seymour.
Ullman, Stuart E.
Vaughan; Clarence J.
Wade, Geo. Win.
Wager, John V.
Wagner, Adam R.
Wagner, Anthony H.
Watkins, Clifton E.
Wegner, Ewald A.
Whipple, Frank E.
Whitesell, Donald M.
Wilkinson, Harold J.
Wolfe, Harry W.
Young, Joseph B.
Zimmerman ,Loren C.
Beuthier, Carl.
The foregoing list contains the names
which have been posted in former
lists but whose papers have not yet
been called for. The papers should be
called for at once.
ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOL TO
HAVE MILITARY ORGANIZATION
The high school cadet will be barred
from the honor he enjoyed last year
by wearing the uniform of an officer,
and the gullible private and non-com
will not be so easily fooled into think-
ing he is saluting a commissioned
man when it is only a high school
youth. Nevertheless preparations are
going on for a full-fledged military or-
ganization at Ann Arbor high school
again this year. There are two com-
panies of rookies being rounded into
reg'lar doughboys under the direction
of F. E. Raymond, who was a lieu-
tenant but received an honorable dis-
charge from the army last winter.
The uniforms for the cadets will be
ordered this week and it is expected
that the 100 students enlisted in the
military course will be wearing khaki
by November. The uniform this year
will be such that the organization may
be easily distinguished from other
military branches. While the officer's
hat is to be worn, the insignia with
A. A. H. S. will be across the front
in the form of d wreath. The confus-
ing letters on the collar will be suc-
ceeded by a button with the same in-
signia on it as on the cap. No chev

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rons or bars will be allowed and only! physical examinations will be :
khaki puttees will be used. into a signal corps and do onl:
Two hours a week will be spent in drill work. The organiastion is
military drill and one hour in class- of the High School Volunteers
room work on military}tactics. Those United States and receives all
students who are unable to pass the ders from military headquarter

MI

LAST

$6,40 and

.t
Aw.
am 44A"
A& pArami

Marching Shoes for Soldier or Civili
In an age of much riding we have become a trifle forgetful of
real uses of feet. But Uncle Sam selects shoes for his men with
idea they are to cover distance in them.
Here is a shoe, a military shoe, with a toe plenty wide, a full i
and a sturdy heel. It will add horse-power to your foot-paver I
makes nothing of the day's work. Try your feet in a pair, you m
take them off. The regulation Munson Army Shoe at

Walk-Over Boot Sh<
115 S. Main St.

R. J. HOFFSTETTEB, Prop.

FITTING BY APPOP

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GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's"Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254

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MEN

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one single room, centrally located.
518 S. Division St. Phone 2182-R.
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or call janitor.
FOR SALE
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FOR SALE--A set of -first class draw-
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TEN WEEKS

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2A Folding Eastman Kodak'
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