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March 25, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-25

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THE WEATHER'
CLOUDY; POSSIBLY
RAIN

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ilail

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 123.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1919.

/

PRICE THREE CENTS

t - -, T

HUNGARN HRS
THREAT RENEWAL
OF HOSTILITI ES
CRISIS OVER BOUNDARY LINES
D1MWN BY PEACE CON-
FERENCE
WASHINGTON ANXIOUS
OVER NEW SITUATION
Old Regime Against Demands of Cen
tal Slavies and Neutral Zones
in Territory
(By Associated Press)
Halifax, March 24.- The steamer
Melrose which left St. Nazarre on
March 9th for New YorL, sent out
wireless calls for help saying that she
was in distress. A message picked
up here said that the ship had lost
her rudder.
Washington, March 24.-Bolshevik
elements apparently have assumed
complete control of the government
of Budapest with a threat of renewal
of hostilities. Advices to the state
department today from three widely
separated European sources tended
to increase theanxiety over the situ.
ation In Hungary.
Trouble Over Territory
There was no indcatioin i to the
extent'of the control f the new re-
gime beyond the cajpital and in the
absence of this ahd other details of-
ficIA wore T0lnlant to discuss the
8siM4tgia A length, It appears from
today's 40i4oa however that the crisis
reslteA from the line of demarkation
established by the peace conference in
(0ntiued on Page Six)
CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY
COMES TO MiCHIGAN
CONFERENCE TRACK EMBLEM ON
DISPLAY AT BUSY
BEEw
Michigan's latest athletic trophy is
here.
The large silver cup, which was
wrested from other competing teams
at the Western Conference indoor
track and field meet hal last Fri-
day and Saturday iA Evanston, is to
be pace4 tn the trophy room of the
Wagermrnn gymnasium after its dis-
Vla tha week ha the .usy-Be show
T44, cu, w,,alo is lined with gold,
ks twQ feet high,. and stands upon a
414 obny base. An engraving of
Nletgeld deaga forms the border
oruid the top, and a frosted field
covers the bell of the cup.,
At the top of the field is the in-
scription "Indoor Track and Field
Meet," and at the bottom the ;word
"Championship." Between these in-
scriptions is an engraved gold medal
designed from those given to Individ-
ual winners. On the medal is a pic-
ture of a discus thrower and the
words "Intercollegiate Conference Ath-
letic association."
None of the names of those on the
team will be put on the cup, but the
following have been accredited by
Coach Steven J. Farrell as winning
the trophy: Captain Sherwald W.
Sedgwick, '19, Carl E. Johnson, '20,
Robert Cook, '20E, Richard C. Losch,

(Continued on Page Six)
BABES SWATHED IN PAPER
Washington, March 24.-Lack
of clothing in the liberated
countries of central Europe is
regarded by Herbert Hoover,
European relief commissioner,
fully as seriogs as the shortage
of food. 1p a cablegrai today
urging the Anierlcan people to
9tri pte J lberally to the col-
lection of clothing being made
this week by the American Red
Cross, Mr. Hoover said that in
some of the war devastated
countries a considerable portion
of the population was unable
to leave their homes because of
insufficient clothing, while new
born babies in Servia are wrap-
ped in paper because cloth was
not available.

SCRIBES TO SMOKE
AT UNION TONIGHT
With Prof. Fred N. Scott, Prof. John
R. Brumm and Lee A. White, of th
Detroit News, as the principal speak-
ers, and with doughnuts, cider, and
cigarettes to add to the festivities, the
free journalism smoker given by Sig-
ma Delta Chi will take place at 8
o'clock tonight in the assembly hall
of the new Union building.
While one of the speeches at least
will deal with a strictly newspaper
topic, it is expected that the talks will
cover a number of points of distinct
importance to all on the campus who
are taking part in literary activities.
Invitations have been extended by
the committee in charge to all stu-
dents of journalism in -the University,
to all members of Pi Delta Epsilon,
correspondents for outside newspa-
pers, and to the members of the staffs
of the different campus publications.
MASQUES PRODUCE
ADAM'S SUCCESS
"Quality Street" will be seen for the
first time on the non-professional
stage on May 8 and 9 in Ann Arbor.
It will be presented by Masques un-
der the direction of Prof. J. Raleigh
Nelson.
Maude Adams achieved remarkable
success with the play upon its intro-
duction to the public in New York,
where 650 performances were given.
Last year it enjoyed revival at the
Empire, in New York, playing for sev-
eral months.
Action in the play takes place in
England at the time of the Napo,
leonic wars. All customs and stage
settings are charateristic of that
period.
The cast will be as follows: Phoebe,
Mary Overman, '19; Patty, Blanche
Howells, '19; Valentine Brown, Mil-
dred Reindel, '19; Miss Fanny, Hilda
Hagerty, '19; Miss Willowby, Helen
Osband, '19; Miss Henrietta, Mabel
Bannister, '19; Charlotte, Beatrice Mc-
Knight, '19; Blades, Melba Bastedo,
'19; recruiting sergeant, Sue Verlen-
den, '19; Spicer, Anna McGurk, '20; Is-
abella, Jennie McPherson, '21; Ar-
thur, Lucile Myers, '22; Harriet,
Elaine Tappan, '19; old soldier, Mar-
ion Ames, '20.
GRADUATION HELD'
FOR 8 DAILY CUBS
Following a lecture given by Prof.
John R. Brummm Monday afternoon,
graduation exercises were held for se-
nior members of The Michigan Daily
Cubs club. A banquet was given at
which several of the graduating class
responded to toasts. Those who re-
ceived their diplomas were as fol-
lows:
Stewart Baxter, John E. McManis,
Paul G. Weber, Hugh W. Hitchcock,
Charles H. Murchison, Thornton W.
Sargent, Renaud Sherwood, and R.
Emerson Swart.
FORMALITY TABOO
AT FRIDAY OPERA
In reply to numerous inquiries that
have been heard on the campus the
Opera committee states that the Fri-
day evening performance will not b
formal.
By common consent in past years
Friday evening was "society night,"
but under the present conditions those

in charge deem it best to do away
with the formality for this year.
FORT SHERIDAN OFFICERS
CONTEMPLATE QRGANIZATION
Meg} wl were commissioned atw
For.t herida will meet at 7 o'clock
Ty'Fsday evening at the Union. Ten-
tative plans will be laid for a ban-
quet.
It is hoped that in the near future
all those who attended the camp for
the three months last summer will be
organized into a society which will
meet at frequent intervals.
STUDENT COUNCIL MEETS IN
OLD UNION BUILDING TONIGHT
There will be a meeting of the
student council at 7 o'clock Tuesday
evening at the 0ld Union building.
All members of the council must be
present, as importaht business is to be
discussed.

STEKETEE AWARDED
FOOTBALL TOKEN
eiridiron Men Discuss Prospects for
Cioming Season at Banquet
Tuesday
BARTELME URGES ATTENTION
OF MEN TO SCHOLASTIC DITTIES
F. W. Steketee, '22, of Grand Rap-
ids, was personally awarded a gold
football watch fob by Coach Fielding
H. Yost at a football dinner held last
night in the Michigan Union build-
ing.
This token was given by Yost as an'
"appreciation of, his excellent ser-
vices during the 1918 season." On the
the face of the gold oval were in-
scribed in blue letters, "Frank W. Stek-
etee, "Champion All-American Full-
back.". On the reverse side were the
numerals, "1918" inblue.
This banquet was the first gather-_
ing of last year's grid men, the pur-
pose of which being to review the
prospects of former years and to de-
termine, if possible, the number of
men desiring to return to the Univer-
sity in the fall.
Coach Yost was the principal speak-
er of the evening. Thegames played
by Michigan during the 18 years of-
his leadership were reviewed, being
followed by a short talk on the pros-
pects for a good eleven this year.
Grid Men Give Speeches
Before the presentation of the gold
football to Steketee, three grid men
gave short talks. The football men
on the speaking program were John
Morrison, John Perrin and Abe Cohn.
Athletic Director Philip G. Bartelme
urged the men to keep up in their
studies in order that they may be elig-
ible for the team in October, due to
the ruling of the Big Ten, which pro-
hibits any grid player to participate
in western Conference games who is
below the passing grade.
Many Guests Present
Among the guests at the dinner
were Irwin Pond, architect of the
Michigan Union and a member of the
1879 eleven which was the first foot-
ball team that represented Michigan;3
Assistant Coach Douglas, Prof. Wil-
liam A. Frayer, and several members'
of the board in control of student ath-
letics.
Coach Fielding H. Yost departs for
Detroit this morning, leaving for his
home from Chicago early Wednesday.
He does not expect to visit Ann Arbor
until late in June or several weeks be-
fore the start of the fall grid prac-
tice in September.
EFFICIENCY MAN SETS
FORTH SUCCESS, RES
"There are five simple rules to suc-
cess," said Mr. Samuel J. Hoexter, in
his talk before the Jewish Students'
Congregation Sunday night in Lane'
hall. "They are just as effective when
applied to religion as when used in
business."
Mr. Hoexter was an instructor in the
engineering department from 1912 to
1916, and was also faculty manager
of the University band. At present
he is a lecturer in the Emerson Insti-
tute.
"I have known these rules to make

successful men. They have not been
hastily put together, but are the re-
sult of long research and study."
First among these rules, according
to Mr. Hoexter, is the thinking and
dealing in fundamentals. These con-
sist in having a desirable commod-
ity, practical production, disposing
facilities, a minimum of loss, and fi-
nancial stability. Such fundamentals
apply to any business or profession,
as well as any line of students' work
in college.
The next rule is to have the right
mental attitude toward the work. This
consists in taking a personal interest
in everything done, and makes for en-
thusiasm and spirit. The other rules
bespeak the personality of the man,,
his initiative, and the time element.
"The last rule is important," said
Mr. Hoexter. "Many men would have
been successful but for their delays.
'Do it now' is a good rule to follow
always. It may make all the differ-
ence between success and failure."

Who Invented Electric Arcs?
Who Invented Storage Zattery?

Who invented the electric arc light?
Who invented the storage battery?
It is likely that if the average stu-
dent were asked to whom the world
owes the credit for these inventions,
the mind would immediately turn to
Edison, the wizard of electricity. It
is not to Edison, but to a University
of Michigan graduate, Charles F.
Brush, '69E, of Cleveland, O., that the
unusual honor belongs.
The great inventor and investigator
of electric lighting has just celebrat-
ed his seventieth birthday anniversary,
yet the use of the electric light has
become so general that it seems much
longer than the age of the genius
would indicate.
As a young man, soon after com-
pleting a course in engineering in the

University, Mr. Brush conceived the
idea of utilizing the electric current
for lighting purposes.
After several discoveries were made,
the inventor, only with considerable
difficulty, succeeded in enlisting the
interest of some of the well-know
scientists of the time. His- device was
then successfully demonstrated at the
Parisexposition, and a corporation for
the manufacture of the lights was or-
ganized.
Many improvements in electric light-
ing have been made, but it is due to
this Miciigan man that the arc light
and the storage battery were devel-
oped! to a point where their practical
character was demonstrated. He has
lived to see the civilized world girdled
with the products of his genius.

UNIVERSITY 6RAD
TO WR ITE H ISTORYT
Brig. Gen. Spaulding, '96L, Appointed
by General Pershing for
Important Work
BRILLIANT MILITARY RECORD
MADE BY U. S. HISTORIAN
Brig. Gen. 0. A. Spaulding, '95, and
'96L, has been appointed by General
Pershing to write the history of the
great world war. Spaulding is a prom-
inent Michigan man, and was a bril-
liant student when attending the Uni-
versity.
Reget Junius E. Beal learned of
the appointment of General Spaulding
to this important position on his re-
cent trip to Washington. In comment-
ing upon the honor conferred on Gen-
eral Spaulding, Regent Beal said,
"General Spaulding, while in the Phil-
ippines wrote me several letters in
which he showed unusual style and
great ability in the choice of words
and subject matter. I think that he
is excellently qualified for the posi-
tion which he is to fill."
Has Access to All Records
In his work as historian. General
Spaulding will have access to all the
war orders and records of the expe-
ditionary forces in France, and when
these are exhausted by his research,
he will probably investigate those in
Washington.
He is an honor graduate of the ar-
tillery school at Fortress Monroe, and
was a graduate of the army staff col-
lege in 1905. It is said that when be-
ing examined for promotion by army
officers, after about 20 minutes of
questioning, they stopped for fear that
Spaulding would begin questioning
them on things of which they knew'
nothing.
Quells Riot in Alaska
General Spaulding distinguished
himself in Alaska by quelling an at-
tempt of the gold miners to start a
riot, and received promotion for this;
exploit. After a series of rapid ad-
vances he was sent to the Philippines,
and on his return to San Francisco,
was made a lieutenant-colonel.
On graduating from the artillery
school at Fort Sill, Okla., he-was made
a colonel and sent to France. While
in France Spaulding received his pres-'
ent rank of brigadier-general.
SOPHS TAKE STAND
AGAINST HAZING
Resolutions with regard to hazing
on the part of all the sophomores of
the University have been formulated
and adopted by the class, and will
take effect immediately.
At the All-Soph smoker held Satur-
day night in the Union assembly room,
the following resolutions which defi-
nitely outline the sophomores' stand
in the matter were unanimously
adopted. '
Resolved-that the classes of '21 are
opposed to pernicious hazing, and will
resent any infringements on this rul-
ing by individual groups. That the
president of each sophomore class ap-
point a member to a committee to
which all infringements upon Michigan
traditions by freshmen be reported.
Western Attorney Visits University
Albert G. Granger, '06L, was in the
city yesterday visiting the Univer-
sity. Mr. Granger is an attorney-at-
law in the west.f

COOKS SUBJECTED
TO STATEEM
Michigan Legislature Follows Lead of
Other States in Passing
Hygiene Law
NEW MEASURE SUPPORTS
PRESENT LOCAL ORDINANCE
Compulsory examination of all cooks
in Ann Arbor boarding houses will be
necessitated by the bill passed by the
Michigan state legislature, and now
waiting for the signature of the gov-
ernor to become a law. It provides
for the examination of persons han-
dling food, including grocers and
butchers.
Laws of this nature have been in ef-
fect in New York and many other
large cities, and have done much
good. They all require an examina-
tion, which is given free of charge
by the city health officias, of all
cooks and waiters for tuberculosis, ty-
phoid, and other contagious diseases.
Many persons, although not having
typhoid themselves, carry it and dis-
seminate it among people who are
susceptible.
Dean Vaughan Declares Need
That a law of this nature is neces-
sary from the standpoint of decency
alone is the opinion of Dean Victor C.
Vaughan. He stated that it would do
much in addition to protecting the pa-
trons of.he restaurants since no one
who was diseased would be able to ob-
tain work as a cook or waiter, and
hence would take more care in mat-
ters of personal hygiene.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of-
ficer, declared that work of this sort
had been carried on for some time in
the city, and that the only thing
which this law would accomplish
would be the support ofthese. When
asked as to whether private houses
would be 'examined, he said that at
first they would probably not be, for
officials would be kept busy in other
places.
Ann Arbor Steward In Favor
The steward of one of Ann Arbor's
big boarding houses declared himself
in favor of the law, in view of the;
fact that though the patrons could see
the waiters previously, and to some
extent judge their condition, they
could tell nothing as to the condi-
tions in the kitchens.
LECTURER VISITS
WARRING ITALIANS
Prof. Charles Upson Clark, who lec-
tures here the evening of April 6 in
Hill auditorium, has visited the Ital-
ian front on two occasions at the be-
hest of the government of Italy.
His first trip was made in the fall
of 1917, when the Germans broke
through the Italian lines and invad-
ed a large portion of Italy, while his
second trip, which was made a year
later, occurred under more favorable
conditions, as the Italians were mak-
ing their famous advance at this time.
Films, that are to be shown at the
lecture here, come from the Italian
front with the full approval of that
government.
Professor Clark was a fellow at the
American School of Classical Studies
at Rome, of which he is now a di-
rector, together with Librarian W. W.
Bishop of this University,20 years ago.
]Much of his time has since been spent
there.

WOMANS APPEAL
WINS ORATORICAL
CONTEST HONORS
ALICE 1I. HOELZLE, '19, GETS
FIRST PRIZE WITH PLEA
FOR ARMENIA
CARL G. BRANDT, '20,
TAKES SECOND PLACE
Successful Candidate Starts Train.
Ing For Work of Big Contest
at Evanston
In a plaintive appeal for the people
of a martyred land, Alice M. Hoelzle,
'19, won first honors in the twenty-
ninth annual University oratorical
contest held last flight in University
hall, with her address, "The Voice of
Armenia." This is the second time
in the history of the University that
a woman has won this contest, the
first successful candidate being Fran-
ces flickock, in 1906.
To Represent iMichgan
Miss Hoelzle will be Michigan's rep-
resentative at the contest of the
Northern Oratorical league on May 2,
at Evanston, Ill. In addition to this
honor Miss Hoelzle won the Chicago
alumni medal and the Kaufman testi-
monial of $100, all of which went with
the first place, which was awarded
her by five of the eight judges.
Carl G. Brandt, '20, won second
place in the contest, receiving the
Kaufman testimonial of $50. He de-
livered "The Eternal Fog."
Will Have Wonien Competitors
Beginning Tuesday Miss Hoelzle
will go into a period of training under
Prof. T. C. Trueblood in preparation
for the big contest at Evanston. Oth-
er universities in the league which
have chosen women contestants are
Northwestern university and the Un-
iversity of Illinois.
In speaking of .the contest Monday
evening Professor Trueblood said,
"The contest was interesting and well
fought. I am satisfied that Miss
Hoelzle will represent the University
splendidly at Evanston."
FORMA HOP INITATIONS,
READY FORDISTRIBUTION
"The class of nineteen hundred and
twenty of the University of Michigan
requests the honor of your presence at
its Junior. Hop Friday evening, April
fourth, nineteen hundred and nine-
teen in Waterman gymnasium, Ann
Arbor, Michigan, at nine o'clock."
Such is the wording of the formal
engraved invitations for the J-Hop
which are to be given out between
4:30 and 5:30 o'clock Tuesday after-
noon in the lobby of the old Union.
More than 600 of these have been
printed, one of which is to be given
to each purchaser of a Hop ticket;
When claiming invitations, the Hop
ticket should be brought along, in or-
der that the number may be recorded
to avoid the disposal of more tha
one ticket to one man. rFraternites
may get all their invitations at one
time.
At this same time those interested
in the offer of the Helen Newberry
residence for the use of girls coming
to Ann Arbor for the Hop may make

application for the privilege. As yet
there has not been a sufficient number
of applications to warrant proceeding
with the proposition, and in order to
secure the opportunities offered, it
will be necessary for at least 25 men
to apply.
Practically all of the Hop tickets
have been disposed of by the commit-
tee. About 500 tickets were offered
for sale; The committee wishes to an-
nounce that flowers are prohibited.
J-IOP LIST WANTED
Names of all girls who will
attend the J-Hop, whether in-
vited by members of a fra-
y ternity or by "independent" men
are requested to be turned in to
The Daily today at the'very lat-
est in order that these names
may be published in the J-Hop
Extra. l

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